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Full text of "The Game breeder"

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MAR 12 1921 




#122 p er Year 

i niti i m i n i ii ii i i i ii i iii iiiiii iii iiin ii iii i iim i im n 




THE* 



OCTOBER, 1915 




The- Object op this magazine- is 

to Make- North Ameeicathe 5iggest 

^Gahe Producing Country in the World 






No. 1 




p 



'■*% 




The Feeding of Sporting Dogs 

Every Gamekeeper knows and appreciates the difficulty of bringing 
the dogs up to "top notch" in the matter of health, especially as the sport- 
ing season hoves in sight. Sporting dogs have to undertake difficult and 
exacting work necessitating a great expenditure of strength and vitality. 
Hence their feeding demands experience, judgment and consideration in 
selecting the best foods to sustain them, and the exclusive use of those 
foods only. 

Sporting Dogs can be made capable of long-sustained effort by liberally 
feeding them with 

SPRATT'S 
DOG CAKES 

which are now recognized in all sporting circles as the Food par excellence 
for keeping dogs up to standard fitness. Dogs fed on Spratt's Biscuits 
work better, behave better, live longer and are more reliable than those 
trained on any other foods. 



Spratt's Dog Cakes prevent dogs Buffering from overstrain by providing 

A RESERVE STOCK OF VITALITY 

— just what so many dogs lack at the time when they need it most. 



ARE YOU FEEDING YOUR DOGS ON SPRATFS? 

If you are not, and wish to prove their value in a practical way, we 

will send you samples free. 

" Dog Culture" mailed on receipt of 2c. stamp. " Pheasant Culture," price 25c. 

"Poultry Culture," 10c. 



SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED 



Newark, N. J. 

1U^- 



San Francisco 



St. Louis 



Cleveland 



Montreal 



:J 



THE GAME BREEDER 



CONTENTS 



Survey of the Field— Our Policy—" More Game " on Long Island— A Report from 
Middle Island— Eight Cats and a Bobtail— Colorado Shooters and the U. S. 
Migratory Bird Act— A Conflict in Laws — Our Game Census — Farmers' Bulletin 692 
— The "More Game" States— Just in Time— A Serious Charge— A Mistake. 
The Wyandanch Club - - - - - - Genl. Geo. W. Wingate 

Hand Rearing at The Wyandanch Club - - - Frederick A. Dallett 

Fish Eating Birds - - - - Charles Hallock 



Breeding Wild Turkeys 

An Attempt to Save California Elk 

The Black Siberian Hare in Canada 

Important Wild Duck Foods 

The Prairie Grouse 

A Bob white Story 



Mary C. Wilkie 

Barton Warren Evermann 

R. H. Cowan 

W. L. McAtee 

Dwight W. Huntington 

Rev. C. W. Siegler 

Prof. J. G. Halpin 

By the Editor 

By Our Readers 

Mallards Introduced 



Quail Breeding in Wisconsin - - - - - 

The Preservation of Rails, Woodcock and Snipe 

Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves 

Quail Breeding — Pheasants and Quail— Breeding Canvasbacks 

in California — More Pheasants Wanted. 

The Florida Law — Is it a Wonder ? 

Editorials — Valuable Lessons — Quail at the Border — Wild Turkey Breeding — The 

Size of the Victory. 

Correspondence, Trade Notes, Book Reviews, etc. 



PARKER DOUBLE GUN 



Makes World's Record 




World's Record for Tournament 
Shooting made by Lester S. German 
with 499x500, and 647x650 on all 16 yd 
Targets, including Practice Day 
with Runs of 372 and 149 straight at 
the Westy Hogans at Atlantic City 
Sept. 15 to 17, 1915. 



Winner of Professional Average— Lester S. German 
with 499x500. Winner of Amateur Average— Woolfolk 
Henderson with 493x500. Third, Amateur Average- 
Allen Heil with 485x500. Winner of Double Championship— Woolfolk Henderson with 
86x50 pairs. Second in Double Championship— Guy V. Deering with 85x50 pairs. Third 
in Double Championship— Allen Heil with 84x50 pairs. Sousa Trophv— Won by Woolfolk 
Henderson with 100 straight. Shanley Trophy— Won by Allen Hei'l with 99x100, and 19 
on the shoot-off. Tied. Westy Hogan Trophy— Allen Heil with 100 straight. National 18 Yard Championship— Won by 
Allen Heil with 97x100. In addition to the above, PARKER GUNS figured prominently in the winning of many other 
high places. 



Send for catnloffue. 



New York Salesrooms, 32 Warren Street 



Meriden, Connecticut 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Our Wild Fowl and Waders 

A Practical Book on the Breeding of Wild Fowl 
for Sport and for Profit 

With Numerous Illustrations. 

Contains chapters on the Preservation of Snipe and Woodcock. 

Many readers of the Game Breeder have bred thousands of Wild Ducks 
by following the instructions in this book. 



DUCK BREEDING IS PROFITABLE. 



PRICE, $1.50; Special Signed Edition, $2.00. 



THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, New York 



Heating and Cooking Stoves for 
Clubs and Cottages 

The Camp Cook Stove 



This is an ideal cook stove for the 
Mining, Lumber and Military 
Camps; will work just as well in 
the open air as indoors. 

Construction Companies working 
arge gangs of men will find this 
well suited to their requirements. 




IRONSIDE* 



Radnor Ranges 
Home Victor Ranges 
Victor Cook Dobule O ven 

Ranges 
Hotel Ranges 
Royal Victor Ranges 
No. 10 Ironsides Cook 
Patrol Wood Stove 
No. 90 Ironsides 
Haddon Ranges 



LEADING STOVES FURNISHED 

Index Heating Stoves Our Friend <jook Stoves 
Solar Kent Heating - Sentry Wood Stoves 

Stoves Home Victor Cellar Furnaces 
Prompt Ranges 



A FEW OF THE 

Home Victor Hot Water Stoves 

Farmer Girl Cook 

New H. A. Elm Double Heaters 

Vulcan Double Heaters 

Tropic Sun Heating Stoves Cozy Ranges 

Haddon Hercules Heating Stoves Victor Cook Ranges 

Ormond Ranges Loyal Victor Ranges 

No. 15 Hot Blast Heating Stoves Victor Hotel Ranges 

Victor Gem Cook Elm Ranges 

Laundry Stoves Farmer Boy Cook Stoves 



Home Cellar Furnaces 
Victor Cellar Furnaces . 
Victor Solar Cellar Furnaces 
Farmer's Furnaces and 

Cauldrons 



Manufactured by 



S. V. REEVES, 45 N. 2nd St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



In writing 10 advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game. 



THE GAME BREEDER 




Now is the Shooter's Time 

The hunting season is here, and the call of the woods, the fields 
and the marshes is not to be denied. 

Get ready! See that your scattergun is oiled and easy. Get a few 
hundred shots practice at the gun club to ensure success in the field. 

Get shells loaded with the powders that win. 




SMOKELESS SHOTGUN POWDER 

DUPONT BALLISTITE SCHULTZE DU PONT BLACK SPORTING POWDER 

Each has its good points : Du Pont — high velocity ; Ballistite — 
waterproof ; Schultze — easy on the shoulder ; Du Pont Black Sporting 
Powder — a favorite for 1 14 years. All give even patterns and are 
bound to get desired results if your aim is right. Du Pont loads, the 
choice of more than 80% of American shooters, are obtainable in all 
standard shells or in bulk at your dealer's. 

E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & COMPANY 

Established 1802 Pioneer Powder Makers of America 

WILMINGTON, DELAWARE 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Game Breeders' Supplies 



WIRE - COOPS - TRAPS 

Wire 

For Deer Parks, Rearing Fields and Kennels 

Coops and Hatching Boxes 

Traps 

For Ground and Winged Vermin 

Egg Turners, Egg Boxes for Shipping 

And all Appliances for Game Farms and Preserves 



I shall be pleased to correspond with game breeders 
who wish to purchase wire, coops, traps or any appli- 
ances for the game farm and preserve. 

Special advice given to all contemplating the game 
breeders' industry. 



F. T. OAKES 

Room 622 
150 Nassau Street New York, U. S. A. 

I do not sell live deer and game birds, or eggs 
Xn writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game. 




SORA 



Order— Paludicoije 
Genus— Porzana 



Family— Rallid^c 
Species— Carolina 



National Association of Audubon Societies 



T h f Game Breeder 



Published Monthly. 



Entered as second-class matter. July g, 1915, at the Post Office, New York City, 
New York, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



VOLUME VIII 



OCTOBER, J9J5 
SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER 1 



Our Policy. 

The object of the Game Conservation 
Society and its publication, The Game 
Breeder, is to make North America the 
biggest game producing country in the 
world. 

Since this number of the magazine 
will be read by hundreds of new sub- 
scribers we re-state what we have often 
said before. It is evident that the game 
can not be made abundant and the shoot- 
ing can not be made good by simply en- 
acting restrictive game laws. Even if 
these laws could be fully executed and 
if every violator could be arrested t^e 
laws would not result in game becoming 
abundant. All scientists know that if 
we add to the causes of destruction, 
even slightly, or add new checks to the 
increase of any species the species must 
vanish and in time it will become extinct. 
It is evident that a little shooting by 
. many guns is a decided check to the in- 
crease of the game and it is well known 
that dogs, cats and rats are additional 
causes of destruction due to civilization. 
The destruction of natural foods and 
covers, the draining of ponds and 
marshes, the losses due to fires and 
floods and to wires and farm machinery, 
all tend to decrease the game supply in 
places where the game is not properly 
looked after. These losses are not af- 
fected by game laws. 

Where game is propagated and pro- 
tected from its natural enemies and from 
the losses due to domestic vermin and to 
the other causes mentioned it becomes 
abundant quickly and remains so al- 
though thousands of birds be shot every 
season. The sportsmen, therefore, 
should form inexpensive shooting clubs 
and look after the game on the farms 



which are now posted, with the approval 
of their owners who should be compen- 
sated. 

The production of an abundance of 
game on places where shooting now is 
prohibited will result in its becoming 
abundant on the wild lands and public 
waters and on many private lands which 
are open to the public, and also on lands 
where permission to shoot is granted. 

The country is large: there is no dan- 
ger of its all being preserved. One or 
two shooting clubs in every county will 
result in the shooting being made good 
throughout the country. The "noisy re- 
fuge" will produce "more game" than 
the quiet refuges advocated by senti- 
mentalists, and it is evident that the same 
area when so used will produce excellent 
shooting for thousands of guns. Our 
readers who provide good shooting are 
doing a public service since under the 
game breeders laws they sell some of the 
game they produce and this tends to 
make the people friendly to sport. Shoot- 
ing can be restored on vast areas where 
it now is prohibited. 

"More Game" on Long Island. 

Field sports have been preserved on 
Long Island, N. Y., and it is interesting 
and instructive to learn that the game is 
increasing. The sportsmen of Ohio and 
other prohibition States can learn much 
from the sportsmen of Long Island. 
Many attempts have been made to pro- 
hibit quail shooting: but the members of 
the Long Island Shooting Clubs, aided 
by The Game Breeder, met these at- 
tempts and secured a law increasing the 
bag limit. This applies not only to the 
club grounds where the supply of game 
is kept up, but also to the rest of the 



6 



THE GAME BREEDER 



island where any one can shoot. How 
much better this is than the prohibition 
of shooting, and the placing of bob white 
on the song bird list ! 

Numerous clubs, with small dues, in 
some cases only $15 per year, look after 
the game in refuges which are quite 
"noisy" during the autumn. Good bags 
of quail ruffed grouse and rabbits are 
made every season without danger of 
extinction because the vermin is con- 
trolled and the game is fed and properly 
looked after in the winter. The game 
overflows and the shooting remains good 
everywhere. It soon would be ended 
were it not for the activities of many 
readers of The Game Breeder. 

A Report from Middle Island. 

Mr. H. J. Montanus, of the Middle 
Island Club (Long Island), has sent an 
interesting report about how the game 
is preserved. The gamekeeper, he says, 
has informed him that there is more 
game this year than ever before. Some 
of the early hatched bevies of quail are 
not very large in numbers owing to ex- 
ceedingly heavy rains. The rabbits are 
abundant. The ruffed grouse have fared 
well, excepting in some places where 
their nests have been disturbed by sum- 
mer wood choppers. 

The real cause for the abundance of 
game on the grounds of the Association, 
Mr. Montanus says, is the "rounding 
up" of worthless dogs, cats and other 
vermin during the breeding season and 
the planting of grain especially for the 
birds. "No laws however drastic can 
make game plentiful if it is not looked 
after during the hard winter and spring 
months when sleet and frost cover all 
food supplies as I described when I told 
about our feeding 21 covies under such 
conditions." 

Eight Cats and a Bobtail. 

Tht gamekeeper at Middle Island in 
his letter to Mr. Montanus said he had 
destroyed "eight cats and one cur dog" 
during the last two weeks. He said he 
was only able to save eight cat tails for 
the vermin exhibit because one of the 
cats had no tail. Mr. Montanus wishes 
to inquire if in our opinion the mother 



of this feline had been associating with 
a buck rabbit. We have advised him to 
refer this important matter to the De- 
partment of Hybrids, U. S. Biological 
Survey. 

Colorado Dove Shooters and the U. S. 
Migratory Bird Act. 

Mr. T. C. Beaman, of Denver, Colo., 
says : "It has been stated that the fed- 
eral immigration bird law does not oper- 
ate on dove shooting in Colorado. This 
is a mistake to a certain extent. Regu- 
lation 2 provides, 'a daily closed season 
on all migratory game birds from sunset 
to sunrise,' to that extent, therefore, the 
federal act does operate on doves." 

A Conflict of Laws. 

Mr. Beaman says, the federal law 
makes a closed season on numerous 
water fowl, shore birds, etc., different 
from the Colorado laws. "Whether the 
federal authorities in Colorado," he says, 
"will undertake to enforce the federal 
act, notwithstanding the State law, is 
something about which I am not advised, 
but as Judge Treber of Arkansas, who 
first held the federal migratory bird act 
unconstitutional, is now sitting in the 
Colorado Federal Court here in place of 
Judge Lewis, it is not likely he will 
change his views and convict any person 
prosecuted here under the federal act." 

Mr. Beaman says a State game officer, 
who preceded the present incumbent, was 
advised that the wardens could not aid 
in enforcing the federal act where con- 
trary to State laws, without violating 
their oaths of office which require them 
to conform to and enforce State laws 
only. 

The conflict in the laws is deplorable, 
but the whole matter does not affect the 
game breeders who have decided that 
they own the game they produce and 
that it is not migratory until it may be- 
come so by leaving the premises of the 
owner. Then, of course, his interest in 
it ceases since he can not retake it in 
replevin. 

Our Game Census. 

Returns coming from our game cen- 
sus indicate that a big lot of game is 



THE GAME BREEDER 7 

now produced in the States where the ferred to the various State game officers 
producers are in no danger of being ar- from whom he can get the entire enact- 
rested. The increase of game will be ments. It is an error to list all the game 
very rapid in the future and when the breeders laws under the heading, "Dis- 
food can be sold at attractive prices now position of Game Raised in Captivity." 
paid for foreign game in the New York Many States do not require the breed- 
market the incentive to produce more ing "in captivity," and we doubt if any 
abundantly will be given. intelligent State game officer will insist 
We hoped to print the figures obtained upon giving the game the diseases due 
by our enumerators in this issue but the to confinement, 
returns are not all in and we find it dif- = 
ficult to get the figures in many localities. The "More Game" States 
Some breeders seem to be opposed to Thirty-two States now' have game 
what Mr Talbot of Indiana calls breeders laws permitting and encourag- 
license and tag foolishness, and since ■ the profitable breeding of all or cer- 
they have not taken out licenses they do tain ies of Qn farms and 
not appear willing to state how much preserves . Some of the laws only per- 
game they have We have seen the mk the breeding of game in the most 
game on some of these places and we difficuIt and unsanitar wa « in captiv . 
propose to get the figures, but we do not it „ A few States onl it the 
propose to publish the names of breed- breeding and sale of big game. Some 
ers in any of the States. Where the onl k the breeding of a few 
license fee is $25, it does not seem to be ies of birds While this is 
worth while to pay it for a pair of wild absurd> of course the tendency ever 
geese or for a few dozen pheasants. The where is in the ri ht direction and it will 
game officers evidently are not aware not be j before it win not be criminal 
how much game is owned by breeders in to produce f or profit an s cies of iool 
some of the States which have not en- on a farm T he best States for game 
acted laws permitting game breeding. breeding are California, Colorado, Con- 
It is evident from the figures we have nect icut, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Mas- 
that a very attractive tot of game quickly sachuset ts, Minnesota, Nevada, New 
will be shipped to the New York market j New Yor k, New Mexico, North 
as soon as it is not held to be a crime Dako t a , Oklahoma, Oregon, South Da- 
to sell food produced by industry in the kot Utah) Vermont, Washington and 
best market. Wisconsin 

We shall review the laws in the "more Arkansas, Maryland, Missouri, West 

game States at length m a later issue. Virginia and Wyoming, permit the prof- 

Our readers are to be congratulated for itable bree ding of big game animals. Illi- 

the remarkable progress they have made. nois permits the bree ders to market deer 

— raised in inclosures and cock pheasants. 

Farmers' Bulletin 692. Other game can be sold for propagation. 

The Annual Bulletin on game laws, is- Kansas permits the transportation of 

sued by the United States Department of game raised in captivity for scientific or 

Agriculture (Biological Survey) con- propagation purposes. Michigan has the 

tains the usual summary of the State and selfish absurdity that deer in captivity 

Federal game laws. It is a painstaking may be killed "for owners consumption." 

document giving an outline of the multi- And birds may be sold for propagation 

tudinous State laws which are now over- within the State and for food without 

laid with the National law relating to the State. If any one knows what can 

migrants with its zones and somewhat be done in twenty-two counties in North 

fanciful regulations. It would be im- Carolina we shall be glad to print the 

possible to more than outline some of news if we can get it in time before the 

the more important laws in the sixty- county laws are changed. Pennsylvania 

three page bulletin and the reader is re- permits the sale of deer, elk, Belgian or 



8 



THE GAME BREEDER 



German hares and ring-necked pheasants 
raised and killed in captivity. Kentucky 
seems to be proceeding on the theory 
that no breeders laws are necessary. 
Pheasants, wild ducks and other game 
owned by individuals are sold, we be- 
lieve. Game breeding is active in many 
other States. 

Just in Time. 

Mr. A. A. Hill, Vice-President of the 
Game Conservation Society, has invented 
and patented a toaster. It is a simple 
but remarkable, useful and valuable de- 
vice which turns out toast quickly, beau- 
tifully browned and far better than any 
"mother used to make." 

Now that we are about to restore quail 
on toast, and this delectable dish will be 
common in every household, it would 
seem that the new toaster is a most 
timely invention. If 800,000,000 quail 
are eaten every season and each quail 
is served on a slice of toast turned out 
by the Hill Toaster, and if the produc- 
tion of quail increases with geometrical 
rapidity, there is no telling what the size 
of the fortune for the inventor will be. 
Toast also is used with tea, and in many 
other ways besides under quail, but the 
invention interests us especially on ac- 
count of the use of the product with the 
hot bird which formerly went so well 
with the cold bottle. 

A Serious Charge! Only Zoos and 
Circuses ? 

Oscar S. Weed made a serious charge 
against the New York Conservation 
Commission in the July Forest and 
Stream. He says: "A year ago my 
brother and I wished to go into wild 
duck breeding so as to let some 
of _ our surplus wild ducks go wild 
again, and thus help the shooting in 
our vicinity. We applied to the 
Conservation Commission for a license 
so to do, but it was refused on the ground 
that they were permitting only persons 
who were operating amusement parks to 
breed wild ducks. Now it seems to me 
that they are foolish in trying to dis- 
courage the farmer." 

We were surprised to learn that the 



Conservation Commission refused a 
license to a breeder. The New York 
laws permit the profitable breeding of 
mallards and black ducks. Many people 
are engaged in this industry for sport 
and for profit. The writer produced 
over 2,500 wild ducks in New York one 
season for a club. Many were shot ; 
many escaped and became migratory ; a 
few hundred ducks and a few hundred 
eggs were sold at excellent prices. 

We are surprised that Forest and 
Stream should publish Mr. Weed's letter 
without comment. Even if the magazine 
is opposed to game breeding and the sale 
of game, it should at least let a reader 
know what he can do. If Mr. Weed 
will apply again for a license it will be 
issued, no doubt. 

A Mistake. 

It would seem that Forest and Stream 
made a mistake in publishing the letter. 
When we called for the correspondence 
we learned that Mr. Weed's application 
was for a permit to take protected birds 
for propagation. Mr. Legge, Chief Pro- 
tector of the Commission, informed Mr. 
Weed that licenses were only issued to 
duly chartered museums and societies in- 
corporated for scientific or exhibition 
purposes. We are of the opinion that 
the Commission has the right to permit 
the taking of game for propagation and 
we have advised our readers, who own 
game, to trap their birds and propagate 
them without asking for permits a sec- 
ond time when their applications are re- 
fused. We doubt if any one will be ar- 
rested for propagating game from stock 
birds which he owns. If any one is, the 
absurdity of the law will be made evi- 
dent, provided the law denies the right to 
take birds for propagation. We do not 
believe it does. 



The increasing sales of our book on 
wild duck breeding, "Our Wild Fowl and 
Waters," indicates that we are to have 
"more wild ducks." Many thousands of 
birds are now owned by breeders and the 
increase will be tremendous next season. 



THE GAME BREEDER 




The Club House. 



THE WYANDANCH CLUB. 

By General Geo. W. Wingate. 



The Wyandanch Club was originally 
the Brooklyn Gun Club, which was a 
trap shooting club formed in July, 1872 ; 

it held its matches at Dexter's Park on 
the Jamaica Road. It reorganized in 

1877 and again in 1884, was incorporated 
on May 15, 1885, and its name was 
changed to the Wyandanch Club on 
March 11, 1893. 

In 1880 it decided to become a field 
club and leased hunting and shooting 
privileges near Smithtown, Long Island. 
About 1883 it established a club house 
at the old Phillips House between Phil- 
lip's mill pond and the railroad trestle, 
which it occupied until December, 1888. 
Its shooting privileges, at first moderate 
in extent, were increased from year to 
year as additional facilities were ob- 
tained. On March 31, 1888, it purchased 
the Prime Farm, on which is the old 
Theodorus Smith Mansion (constructed 
in 1751), which it fitted up and has 
since used as its club house. The title 
goes back through patents from Gover- 



nors Nicolls and Andros to Richard 
Smythe, "the Bull Rider," and even 
back to the crown; supplemented by the 
Indian grant from Wyandanch, the chief 
of the Montauks, July 14, 1659, to Lyon 
Gardner, "in consideration of the serv- 
ice" of the latter in securing the release 
of the old chief's daughter from captiv- 
ity by the Pequots. 

The old mansion was largely recon- 
structed, and two wings have been added 
until it has become a spacious and com- 
fortable building 95 feet long by 32 feet 
deep, with an "L" 33 feet deep. It is 
just the place needed by an active busi- 
ness man who is interested in shooting, 
fishing and open air recreation. The 
club house contains large parlors, read- 
ing and smoking rooms, a large dining 
room, a billiard room and three baths. 
There are 24 bedrooms in the additions 
at the ends, which are leased to mem- 
bers who united in constructing the 
building in which they are contained. 
There are also bedrooms in the main 



10 



THE GAME BREEDER 



building- which are common to all the 
members of the club. The building is 
comfortably furnished, with all accom- 
modations. The L contains the kitchen 
and the rooms for the steward and his 
help. 

Near the club house are barns having 
ample stable and other accommodations, 
outhouses for various purposes; exten- 
sive kennels where the dogs belonging to 
the members are taken care of through- 
out the year. There are also several 
cottages on the place which are used by 
employes and for other purposes. The 
tract on which the club house stands 
contains 2,000 acres and is owned by 
the club. The club also leases shooting 
and fishing rights over the adjoining 
land so that taken together it has shoot- 
ing privileges over more than 12,000 
acres. Much of the land is hilly and 
the residue is rolling. A great deal is 
wooded and there are thickets, swamps 
and other covering affording ample pro- 
tection for game. 

The club land contains two large mill 
ponds, on which Daniel Webster fished, 
and three artificial ponds, all of which 
are fed by cold springs. The club also 
owns or holds under lease the most valu- 
able part of the Nisequogue River above 
tide water. It leases the celebrated 
"Stump Pond" of over 40 acres and two 
other nearby ponds which furnish an 
aggregate water area of nearly 60 acres. 
These waters constitute one of the finest 
trout preserves in the country. Stump 
Pond is stocked with large mouth bass 
and perch. The club has two large 
hatcheries in which, before the advent 
of the trout disease on Long Island, 
many thousand trout were annually 
hatched and turned out. This disease 
began in 1903 and since then has gener- 
ally affected Long Island water, includ- 
ing those of the Wyandanch Club. The 
club has made every endeavor to com- 
bat it, cleaning the ponds, getting foreign 
trout, supplying additional water to the 
hatcheries, and matters of that descrip- 
tion. All these measures, however, have 
proved unavailing. The young trout do 
well until their second year when they 
are attacked and soon die. Rainbow 



trout proved to be immune to the dis- 
ease but were not sufficiently "free 
biters" and the club has now adopted a 
policy of buying good sized trout in the 
spring of each year and turning them 
out rather than raising its own stock. 

The club has sown buckwheat, millet, 
Hungarian grass, wheat and other seeds 
in patches over the grounds which it 
owns or leases to provide food for the 
quail and other birds. During the win- 
ter, when snow or sleet covers the 
ground, sheaves of wheat are plentifully 
scattered. Steps are also taken to in- 
sure the destruction of foxes, hawks and 
other enemies, and watchers are hired to 
protect the game from poachers. 

Until prevented by legislation the club 
was in the habit of purchasing and an- 
nually turning out a number of quail, 
and in this way the losses which were 
sustained through severe winters and 
from other causes were made up so that 
the shooting was superior to anything 
that could be found north of Virginia. 
Since the law! hais prevented the ac- 
quisition of new quail, it is much more 
difficult to maintain a supply of these 
birds. 

The club now raises wild mallard 
ducks and Mongolian pheasants on a 
very large scale on its own farm. Its 
gamekeepers are experienced. The 
breeding is very successful so that the 
shooting is first class. 

Railroad facilities are ample, six 
trains running each way every day, with 
stage accommodations for each train 
during the sporting season. 

Members are permitted to bring their 
families and other guests to the club at 
proper seasons, and it is extensively used 
by the ladies, who find great pleasure 
in fishing and boating on the club ponds 
during the summer and in skating in 
winter. Since the advent of the auto it 
has largely become a country club. 

The club is a proprietary one, each 
of the 45 members owing a share which, 
subject to reasonable regulations, is 
available to him as property. These 
have greatly increased in value during 
the last two years. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



11 



The initiation fee is $100. The dues increased to $300 to meet the cost of 
have been $200 but have recently been the duck and pheasant raising plant. 



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Trout Pond, Wyandanch Club. 



HAND REARING AT THE WYONDANCH CLUB. 

By Frederic A. Dallett. 



In regard to our recent attempt at 
raising game for shooting purposes, I 
would say that in 1913 we raised about 
1,000 mallards and 800 pheasants, and 
in 1914 about 1,200 mallards and 800 
pheasants. As the birds raised were all 
used during the shooting season by the 
club we did not market any in either 
year. 

This season we are in hope of raising 
a larger supply of both mallards and 
pheasants and I am in hopes we will 
have between 2,000 and 2,500 of each. 



Enclosed herewith I am sending you 
a few photographs, No. 1 of the club 
house, No. 2 of the gamekeeper's lodge 
and the balance being photographs of 
some of our ponds, which you may find 
of use. 

I would suggest your making us a 
visit and have already spoken to our 
steward, Ben Tyler, and Gamekeeper 
Edgar that you will probably do so and 
they will be pleased to make you com- 
fortable in case you are able to visit the 
club. 



FISH-EATING BIRDS. 

By Charles Hallock. 



When young Von Steinwehr, of Cin- 
cinnati, shot the loon on Geneva Lake, 
in Minnesota, last summer, nearly all 
the guests at the beach condoned the 
act because, they said, it was a most ex- 
cellent shot, right in the eye, from a 
moving boat, at a distance of 100 yards, 
with a rifle. The big bird was not mu- 
tilated at all for a specimen, and it was 
accordingly stuffed forthwith by taxi- 
dermist Lindquist and mounted as a 



trophy at the Geneva Beach Hotel. It 
stood on the glass cigar case in the office 
where its long indicative bill pointing 
constantly toward the open "tickler" on 
the desk, served as a perpetual reminder 
of unpaid dues for boat hire, cigars, fish 
bait, frogs and ginger ale. 

Old Man Updegraff, however declared 

that it was a shame to kill the loons. 

.There were only a few of them left, and 

he loved to see them flying from lake to 



12 



THE GAME BREEDER 



lake, and to listen to their weird call just 
before a rain. "For," he said, "it is a 
fact that rain is sure to follow the cry 
of a loon within twenty-four hours 
after." 

This statement was disputed on its 
face by Prof. Vandemore, who declared 
that he was at the beach one whole sum- 
mer when it did not rain at all, and the 
loons hollered every night all the same. 

"Oh, that was an off year," Mr. Sned- 
icor rejoined. "They just hollered out 
of spite, because it didn't rain!" 

All hands were examining the specimen 
just after it had been brought in, and 
presently one happened to notice the 
tail of a four-ounce perch sticking out 
of its gullet, which the bird seemed to 
have been in the act of swallowing when 
it met its fate. This circumstance was 
thumbs down for Mr. Loon, for it at 
once directed prejudice against him as 
a fish destroyer, and anglers are jealous 
of their prerogatives, especially when 
they fish for count, as most of them 
seemed to do at Geneva Beach. Any 
feathered pirate (kingfisher, loon, gull, 
crow or fish hawk, land bird or water 
fowl) which would detract one iota 
from the chances of an angling competi- 
tion would come under the ban and be 
destroyed at once if reached. 

This disturbing factor naturally raised 
the question as to the actual damage 
done to sport and the economic fisheries 
by fish-eating birds, as well as their 
number and variety ; and I was accord- 
ingly induced to investigate from data 
opportunely at hand whereby I w^ G 
enabled to reach results which I am 
certain will surprise your readers as 
much as they did me. The facts I 
gather were first submitted by Robert 
Ridgeway, curator of the Ornithological 
Department of the National Museum at 
Washington, to the International Fish- 
eries Congress, held in London in 1885 ; 
and as the summary is my own, com- 
piled from the Ridgeway list, I doubt 
if the like has ever been published be- 
fore. From the prefatory note in the 
catalogue it would seem that there are 
no less than a grand total of 277 aquatic 
species, in addition to the fish-eating 
land birds, like the kingfisher, osprey, 
ousel, etc., which live largely upon fish 



Indeed all water birds may be assumed 
to be piscivorous. Grouped in their 
orders, they would appear as follows: 
Catalogue of Aquatic Fish-Eating 
Birds. 
Order of Herodiones or Herons. 

Herons, varieties 14 

Storks : 2 

Ibises 4 

Spoon-bill ibis 1 

Total 21 

Order of Limicoles or Shore Birds — - 
Eat Eggs or Spawn. 

Oyster catchers 3 

Turnstones 3 

Plovers 15 

Snipes 5 

Sandpipers 22 

Woodcock , 2 

Godwits 4 

Curlews 5 

Yellowlegs 2 

Greenshanks ; 1 

Willets 1 

Tattlers ..'.:." 2 

Phalaropes 3 

Avocets '. 2 

Total 70 

Order of Paludicoles or Marsh Birds. 

Rails 10 

Gallinules . . - 

Crakes 

Jacana 1 

Coots .' 

Limpkin 1 

Cranes 3 

Flamingo 1 

Total 22 

Order Anseres. 

Swans 4 

Geese 12 

Brant 2 

Ducks 40 

Total 58 

Order Steganopodes or Totipalmate 
Swimmers. 

Pelicans » 

Cormorants 12 

Gaunets 4 

Tropic birds 2 

Total 21 



THE GAME BREEDER 13 

Order Gaviae or Gull-like Szvimmers. ward to seize them. And sometimes a 

Skimmer 1 mother goose with her family of gos- 

Kittiwakes 2 lings will be sitting unsuspectingly on 

Gulls 22 the water when one of the brood sud- 

Terns 17 denly flutters and disappears, and pres- 

Skua gulls or jaegers 4 ently another follows, and then another, 

until at last the old lady, who is unable 

Total 46 to count, finds herself wholly bereft 

Order Tubinaves. a " d ch T ildle , ss > despoiled by a voracious 

\lbatrosses 5 P ■ ocean, too, the angler or 

Petrels or fulmars! '. '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 15 goosefish, with gaping mouth, the shark, 

Shearwaters -11 barracouda and the cod all live on 

sea birds ; and in Newfoundland the fish- 
Total 31 ermen use the petrels, shearwaters and 

hagden for bait in catching codfish, and 

Order Pygopodes or Divers. G n the seal islands in the Pacific the fish 

Grebes 8 known as killer will hang around the 

Loons 3 rocks and snatch the seals off as they 

Auks 7 clamber up the kelp-covered slopes. 

Puffins 5 Thus goes on the struggle for exist- 

Doyekie 1 ence. It is not only "dog eat dog," ac- 

Guillemots 14 cording to the adages, and "fleas which 

have other fleats to bite 'em, and so go 

Total 40 on ad infinitum," but in all the animal 

Grand total 277 kingdom we find the law of reprisal m 

We discover, however, that reprisal constant operation. Man's sympathies 

is the prime order of nature, and that go with those which affect his own sub- 

the water birds do not have it all their sistence least. If edible ducks were the 

own way ; for the pikes, muscalonge and customary victims of the pike, it might 

gars feed largely on shore birds, tilts or become a question with the sportsman 

sandpipers especially ; while many a as to which he would incline, depending 

loon, teal or dipper becomes a prey to mainly upon his proclivities as angler or 

the larger fishes, who incontinently turn hunter. As for loons, gulls, grebes, 

the tables upon them and swallow them hawks and kingfishers, which enliven our 

whole. Swallows, when flitting upon lakes and give them charm, I would 

the calm surface of lakes in summer, spare them all and grant the few fish 

are often caught on the wing, and small they catch ; for a wilderness without 

land birds sitting on branches which animal life is as desolate as a hearth 

overhang the shore are often picked off without a fire. Tenantless, ft is almost 

by ravenous pike, which leap 2 feet up- as a body without a soul. 



BREEDING WILD TURKEYS. 

By Mary C. Wilkie. 

I write my experiences with wild tur- from the woods, two being caught in a 

key raising believing they may be of in- wire fence before fully grown and the 

terest to those who have had to meet others hatched from a nest of eggs 

the same difficulties I have encountered, found on our farm. They have had to 

My breeding stock being so very wild be kept up all the time, that is confined 

has made matters more difficult, but I in my five-acre breeding lot. This is 

am hoping that their young will not be surrounded with a nine-foot fence made 

so wild and therefore less difficult to han- of two pieces of ordinary woven' wire, 

rile. All the breeders I now have came having the wires an inch or two apart 



14 



THE GAME BREEDER 



at the bottom and gradually increasing 
in width. As my turkeys are not pin- 
ioned, they have to have a wing clipped 
and in order to catch them for this pur- 
pose they are driven, or decoyed into a 
narrow wire passage. 

About a third of this field is in tall 
pines, carefully trimmed up, however, 
within five or six feet of the fence. The 
rest of the ground is cultivated, part in 
corn, part peas, a portion in an oats and 
grass mixture, and now it is time to 
sow turnip and clover. It is not only 
to supply them with food that this cul- 
tivating is done, but to keep the ground 
sweet, for I think a turkey must be the 
most easily diseased of all birds. But 
perhaps I should say the most difficult 
to cure. I have heard farmers say, "a 
sick sheep is a dead sheep," and I used 
to think the same of my turkeys, but 
now I have reached the length of doc- 
toring them pretty successfully for 
everything but gapes. 

The turkeys lay their eggs in the piney 
part of this lot, making their own nest 
and it has always been a question 
whether the crows or I should find the 
nest first. I put a china egg or a round 
white stone for a nest egg, to disappoint 
the crow and keep the birds laying in the 
same nest, and of course gather the eggs 
daily. These I set under a domestic tur- 
key and she rears the poults on our farm 
of three hundred and seventy-five acres, 
even rambling over as much more 
ground on a neighboring farm. The 
larger the number of turkeys the farther 
they roam, and thus they meet many of 
the native wild turkeys which abound 
down the Newfound and Little rivers. 
This necessitates my confining the 
young ones in the early fall or winter, 
because, while they will stay with their 
foster mother a long time as they get 
fully grown they are sure to leave to 
join their wood kinsmen. But while still 
following their mother they can be 
driven into shelter and caught. 

Now as to the attention given the little 
wild ones : I suppose every'turkey raiser 
knows nearly all turkey diseases are of 
the liver and intestines. To regulate the 
liver I feed green food at everv meal, 



either chopped lettuce or onion tops, 
raised for this purpose, or wild pepper 
grass. They prefer the onion tops to 
any other green, but will eat lettuce thor- 
oughly mixed with the curd, and it is 
easy to raise an abundance of it. When 
this great amount of green affects the 
bowels, as it often does, bringing on that 
turkey scourge, white diarrhoea, I give 
Epsom salts, a teaspoonful to twelve 
poults, mixed with a little curd and they, 
if hungry, have eaten enough before 
they taste the difference. Turpentine is 
just as necessary; as it smells so strong, 
they have to be deceived into eating the 
curd in the same way. The curd I refer 
to its ordinary clabber scalded (not 
boiled, it is useless then) squeeze dry 
and it should crumble like cold bread if 
right. This is their first food, alternated 
with stale white bread soaked in sweet 
milk ; squeezed dry, not doughy. ■ After 
ten days, I feed cooked corn bread, sea- 
soned with a little salt just as for the 
table, soaked in sweet milk. At ' this 
time a little grain should be fed; as the 
wheat and oats are cut a little later here, 
they then get all their own food from 
the gleanings. And now, late in August, 
they are prone to add a little corn in 
the milk state, of their own free will. 
But I always feed something at night to 
bring them home, often a mash from the 
formula prescribed by the Rhode Island 
Experiment Station: 

6 parts corn meal. 

4 parts bran. 

2 parts middlings. 

1 part linseed meal. 

They like it moistened with buttermilk 
' or sour milk, though I often use water. 
The poults thrive on Spratt's Turkey 
meal and on chicgrain, also. But what- 
ever is used, I have found it necessary 
forcibly to feed them at first. I think 
when they grow less wild, in a genera- 
tion or two, this may not be necessary. 

After the young ones are ten or twelve 
weeks old, they can live on the insects 
and greens they find for themselves, if 
they have access to grain fields or where 
grain has been harvested, and just need 
cracked corn, wheat, or oats or mash, 
anything to bring them home to roost. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



15 



Mine roost in a house about forty feet 
long, ten feet high in front and seven at 
the back, one-half of the front being 
open with wire netting over the opening 
to confine the birds and exclude owls 
and the like. The floor is of cement for 
dryness, and this is covered at all times 
with a deep litter which is often changed. 
This makes the house easy to clean, 
though under the roosts which are four 
feet long, is a dropping board of course. 
Thus they are roosting practically in the 
open, yet protected from rain and prowl- 
ers. 

As to treatment of diseased and sick 
birds, I could not raise turkeys without 
turpentine, first, last and always. It 
cannot be administered in the drinking 
water, because they won't touch it, but 
as above. A case of diarrhoea taken in 
time can be cured with salts, then tur- 
pentine, and curd for food. Dr. Hadley 
of the Rhode Island Experiment Station, 
has found that the secret of the efficacy 
of curd as a turkey food, is an acid it 



contains and he describes a culture that 
can be used in the milk, which curdles 
it with a much higher percentage of this 
acidity. I have never taken the trouble 
to incubate the milk, however, in this 
way. 

The best remedy I know for grown-up 
turkeys that are ailing is one prescribed 
by Margaret Mahaney of Massachu- 
setts. It is administered in pills and has 
the following composition : 
y 2 lb. ginger. 

2 tablespoonfuis sulphate of iron, 
1 teaspoonful salicylate of soda, 
1 teaspoonful of turpentine and water 
to moisten. But this should be preceeded 
with a good purgative, salts, or oil and 
then administered every two hours if the 
bird is very sick. Three times a day, for 
a milder case. 

All my turkeys, old and young, have 
access at all times to fresh water, crush- 
ed oyster shells or china, and charcoal. 
Situated as they are, they get their own 
grit. Coarse sand is sufficient. 



AN ATTEMPT TO SAVE CALIFORNIA ELK. 

By Barton Warren Evermann. 
Director of the Museum, California Academy of Sciences. 



Whether the Marin County elk were 
of the same species as the San Joaquin 
Valley elk is not certainly known. It 
may be that the elk of the heavily for- 
ested, humid region along the coast from 
Marin County northward is a distinct 
species. The facts can be determined 
only by comparison of material from 
the two regions. But whatever may be 
the facts as regards this matter, it is 
clear that elk were very abundant in the 
San Joaquin Valley and adjacent foot- 
hills, certainly as late as 1850 to 1854. 
From that time they decreased rapidly. 
In the early seventies it is said the herd 
had been reduced to a few individuals — 
one report says to a single pair — and 
they were on the Kern County ranch of 
Messrs. Miller & Lux. It is said that 
the imminent extinction of the species 
came to the attentiion of Mr. Henry 
Miller cf the Miller & Lux Company, and 



he immediately gave strict orders to all 
the employees of the company that the 
elk not be disturbed under any circum- 
stances, and that everything possible for 
their protection should be done. 

That has been the policy of Messrs. 
Miller & Lux to this day. The ani- 
mals were protected. The herd increased. 
In 1914 it was estimated to contain about 
four hundred animals. The state game 
law makes the killing of any elk a fel- 
ony, punishable by imprisonment for a 
term not exceeding two years. Although 
the elk roam at will over the Miller & 
Lux ranch, doing — the company esti- 
mates—from $5,000 to $10,000 worth of 
damage every year to the alfalfa and 
Egyptian corn fields and to the fences, 
they have not been disturbed. That the 
species was not exterminated is due, 
without doubt, to the intelligent interest 
taken in its preservation by Mr. Henry 



16 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Miller. It must be admitted, however, 
that Messrs. Miller & Lux are willing, 
in view of the very considerable loss the 
elk are causing them each year, to -have 
the herd reduced somewhat by moving 
some of the animals to suitable reserva- 
tions in other parts of the state. 

With this object in view, on the sixth 
of last April, Mr. LeRoy Nichel, on be- 
half of Miller & Lux, offered to turn 
over to the California Academy of Sci- 
ences all or such portion of the herd of 
California elk now roaming over their 
Kern County ranch as they might be able 
to catch, provided the Academy would 
undertake to distribute them to various 
federal, state, and private reservations 
in the State of California. 

In 1905 a few elk were taken from 
this herd and placed in the Sequoia Na- 
tional Park, where they have done fairly 
well. These and the original Kern 
County herd are the only elk of this 
species in existence. 

The development of the oil fields and 
the expansion of agricultural operations 
in the Kern County region have brought 
many dangers to the elk herd in that 
locality. To aid in saving the species 
from possible extermination it was pro- 
posed to place a few elk in each of the 
various reservations and parks in the 
state in the hope that they might thrive 
there and become the nuclei of new 
herds. 

This was the hope of Messrs. Miller 
& Lux. • One of the conditions of their 
offer was that the animals should be 
put only in places affording a favor- 
able environment and where they would 
probably breed. 

The offer of Miller & Lux was ac- 
cepted by the Academy, and plans were 
made for carrying out the undertaking. 

On April 25 and 26, in company with 
Mr. M. Hall McAllister, through whom 
Messrs. Miller and Lux made the offer 
to the Academy, I visited tihe Kern 
County ranch for the purpose of consul- 
tation with the superintendent as to the 
best time and method for caching and 
shipping the animals and regarding all 
preliminary details. At that time a visit 
was made to the alfalfa fields in which 
the elk feed and to the sage-brush plains 



to which they retire during the day or 
when disturbed, and about 100 of the 
animals were seen. 

After giving the matter careful con- 
sideration it was decided to undertake 
the catching and shipping of the elk in 
October. Early in that month Messrs. 
Miller & Lux constructed a corral one 
fourth of a mile long and one eighth of 
a mile wide in an alfalfa field into which 
the elk were observed to come every 
night to feed. A wing one-fourth of a 
mile long was run out from each corner 
of the end toward the foothills. Woven 
fence wire was put upon the wings at 
once, but only the posts for the corral 
proper were placed at that time. After 
the elk had come down into the field 
several nights and gotten used to the 
posts, heavy woven fence wire was 
placed on the two sides and the rear end 
of the corral, and the following night 
about 150 elk came into the corral; then 
the wire was placed on the posts at the 
entrance and the animals were trapped. 

The wire fence was very strong and 
at least eight feet high; nevertheless,, 
some broke through or jumped over it, 
A good many people came out in auto- 
mobiles and otherwise to see the elk, 
and so frightened them that about 100 
broke out the first afternoon. Those that 
remained became quite tame in a few 
days. Various, diverse and unexpected 
difficulties came up every day and it was 
not possible to predict what success 
would be attained in the undertaking. 
The animals might break through the 
corral or jump over the fence and es- 
cape ; .they might escape when being 
loaded into the crates for hauling to the 
railroad cattle pens ; or escape from the 
cattle pens ; or refuse to eat ; or run 
amuck and kill or injure themselves ; or 
die in the cars while in transit to the 
parks ; any one of a score of things might 
happen to cause failure. 

However, it is gratifying to know that, 
in spite of all difficulties and uncertain- 
ties, Messrs. Miller & Lux succeeded 
in capturing and placing in the cars for 
shipment a total of fifty-four elk. These 
were disposed of as follows : 

1. To a thousand acre private reser- 



THE GAME BREEDER 17 

vation of Mr. J. M. Danziger, Los An- merit Company near Monterey. The 

geles,'six elk. environment, it is believed, will prove 

This reservation is in the Santa Mon- favorable, 

ica Mountains, near Los Angeles. The Recent reports received from the vari- 

environment, it is believed, will prove ous parties to whom the elk were sent 

very favorable. state that the animals are doing well in 

2. To a six hundred acre private reser- all cases. 

vation of Mr. E. L. Doheny, Los An- The Academy has orders, which it has 

geles, ten elk. not yet been able to fill, for about 100 

This reservation also is in the Santa additional head. An effort will be made 

Monica Mountains, only a short distance to fill these orders next year, 

from the Danziger ranch, and is under It should be stated that all matters 

elk-proof fence. pertaining to the capture and delivery of 

3. To a seven hundred acre park of the elk on board the cars were in the 
Mr. S. C. Evans, Riverside, four elk. hands of Messrs. Miller and Lux. The 

This park adjoins the city limits of actual shipping of the animals was at- 

Riverside and furnishes ideal conditions, tended to by Mr. A. L. Bolton, assistant 

4. To the San Diego City Park, curator of mammals, who performed the 
twelve elk. rather trying duties with good judgment, 

The conditions here are not entirely as skill and entire success. Not an animal 

favorable as one would desire, but it is was lost or injured after being placed in 

believed the elk will do well. This park the cars and all reached their respective 

was regarded as a favorable location in destinations apparently in excellent con- 

which to try the experiment of keeping dition. Mr. John Rowley, curator, de- 

the elk in relatively small enclosures. partment of mammals, and Mr. Herring, 

5. To the Modesto City Park, two elk. taxidermist were on hand at Buttonwil- 

6. To the California Redwood Park low during the entire time and saved 
Association, ten elk. for the museum of the California Acad- 

This association is the governing body emy of Sciences all the an : mals that got 

for the Big Basin reservation, which killed or fatally injured. On the whole, 

comprises some 55,000 acres. It is be- the experiment of distributing the elk 

lieved the conditions obtaining there will to various parts of the state is regarded 

prove favorable. as having been a success, and it is be- 

7. To the Del Monte Park, ten elk. lieved it will do much toward the con- 
These elk were turned loose in the servation of this interesting species of 

large reservation of the Pacific Improve- big game. 



THE BLACK SIBERIAN HARE, IN CANADA. 

By R. H. Cowan. 

The Black Siberian Hare is the last can be produced at a very low cost and 

addition to the various varieties of rab- careful breeding will bring it to a high 

bits or hares. state of perfection. Sufficient proof for 

All admirers of this newly found this statement is found in the colors and 

breed, claim that it is going to take the shapes to which pigeons, fowl and other 

place of the wild furbearing animals, animals have been bred, 

which are fast becoming extinct, and The advantage of breeding to perfec- 

that its fur will fill a gap between the tion in this animal is greater than in al- 

very expensive Black Fox Skin, and the most any other, as two generations can 

cheaper furs, such as those of the com- be produced in a single year, because 

mon rabbit, the muskrat, etc. they breed very young. Thus, by breed- 

The fur of the Black Siberian Hare ing only from animals selected for the 



18 



THE GAME BREEDER 



quality of their fur, perfection can soon 
be reached. 

The Black Siberian Hare is indigenous 
to Siberia. The animal therefore, re- 
quires a thick, rough pelt, and close 
warm fur to protect it from the cold of 
its native country. In fact, its skin is 
as thick as that of muskrat, mink or 
marten, and its fur is a rich glossy black. 
Sometimes, however, a silver gray will 
appear. 

As the Black Siberian comes from a 
country that has a decided summer and 
winter, he does not continue changing 
his coat all through the summer, and 
partly so through the winter, as do rab- 
bits and hares bred for numerous gen- 
erations in mild climates. In the latter 
case the skin of the rabbit or hare is 
almost useless. 

The Black Siberian Hare, like other 
good furbearing animals, has a light 
summer coat. This he changes in the 
fall for a thick, black, winter coat (some- 
times silver gray). The skin then is in 
season and is very valuable, whether 
black or silver gray. 

This Black Siberian Hare is of enor- 
mous size, maturing so rapidly that at 
six months a good specimen will weigh 
ten pounds. The flesh is delicious, be- 
ing between the flavor of chicken and 
that of spring lamb. This animal is also 
very hardy. It can stand the severest 
winter without any protection from cold. 
It will breed as freely as common rab- 
bits and its young grow much faster, 
being at three months old, the size of 
a full-grown Belgian Hare. They are 
more spritely and active than a common 
rabbit, can jump five feet high and 
therefore require a high fence to en- 
close them. 

In appearance these hares are long, 
round in the body, and quite tall. They 
stand more upright than the common 
rabbit, being more deer-like, especially 
when running. 

In color they resemble the Black Fox ; 
the great majority are black, but oc- 
casionally a handsome silver gray ap- 
pears, as is also the case among Black - 
Foxes. 

At present the Black Siberian Hare is 



very rare in America. Only a few pairs 
have as yet been imported to North 
America. They are not even numerous 
in Siberia, being found wild only in a 
few places and those in dense swamps 
where the animal has no protection from 
beasts of prey. This last fact prevents 
them from becoming numerous. Thus, 
it is evident that they have not been al- 
lowed to increase fast, even though their 
reproductive power is so great when they 
are protected from their enemies. 

One of the Black Fox Fur Companies 
has imported a few of these Black Si- 
berian Hares with the idea of breeding 
them in conjunction with Black Foxes. 
They hope to utilize the flesh of the hare 
to feed the foxes, and at the same time 
receive a handsome profit from the skins. 

Let us now compare the Black Siberi- 
an Hare with the Black Fox: 

The Black Siberian Hare is as large 
if not larger than the Black Fox. The 
Black Fox is a carniverous animal and 
each one eats about twenty-five dollars 
($25.00) worth of meat in a year. The 
Black Siberian Hare, being a herbiver- 
ous animal, can be fed for a year at a 
cost of eighty cents ($.80). 

The Black Fox is a monogamist and 
a male must be kept for every female. 
Even then they sometimes fail to mate. 
The Black Siberian Hare, however, is a 
polygamist and one male will serve 
twenty or more females. 

The Black Fox breeds but once a 
year, and even this once is very uncer- 
tain. The Black Siberian Hare, with 
good management will breed almost 
every month in the year and in each lit- 
ter there are more young than in one 
litter of the Black Fox. 

Therefore it can be readily seen that' 
although the fur of this hare is not so 
valuable as that of the Black Fox, still, 
breeding the Black Siberian Hare for its 
fur gives the owner far more satisfac- 
tion and has many advantages over 
breeding Black Foxes. 

Besides, all thinking people now real- 
ize that the vast prairies of the North- 
west, that pastured thousands of cattle 
and sheep free of cost to their owners, 
have been claimed by human settlers and 



THE GAME BREEDER 



19 



used for other purposes. This has problem must be solved because people 

raised the price of beef and mutton accustomed to eating meat cannot exist 

until now they are almost beyond the without it. Here, then, is a substitute 

reach of even the well-to-do people, and for both cheap meat and cheap fur, 

they are still soaring in price. But, this namely — The Black Siberian Hare. 



IMPORTANT WILD DUCK FOODS. 

Wigeon-Grass. 
By W. L. McAtee, Asst. U. S. Biological Survey, 



Value as Duck Food. 

Wigeon-grass is of rather restricted 
range, but of considerable importance as 
a duck food almost everywhere it grows. 
In no locality, so far as known, is it 
more important than on the coast of 
Texas. Here the bays that have kept 
their wigeon-grass have kept their ducks ; 
those in which the plant have been de- 
stroyed by influxes of mud and filling 
up of inlets have lost them. At Rock- 
port, Tex., wigeon-grass still holds its 
own and is the main dependence of the 
visiting vegetarian ducks. About 64 per 
cent, of the food of 33 pintails collected 
at Rockport in December was made up 
of rootstocks, leaves and seeds of 
wigeon-grass. This plant furnished also 
two-thirds of the food of 3 wigeons, and 
more than 54 per cent, of that of 37 red- 
heads taken at the same time. 

Records of the food of ducks on St. 
Vincent Island, Florida, show two other 
species of ducks to be very fond of this 
grass. Nineteen little bluebills collected 
in January had eaten it, principally the 
seeds, to the extent of over 63 per cent, 
of their food, the number of seeds per 
stomach varying from 500 to 4,000. The 
food of 17 gadwells taken at the same 
time and place was 84 per cent, wigeon- 
grass, and the stomach of a redhead con- 
tained about 5,120 seeds. 

Most of the duck stomachs received 
by the Biological Survey from South 
Island, South Carolina, have contained 
wigeon-grass. It composed 41 per cent, 
of the food of 3 blue-winged teals col- 
lected there in March, and 27 per cent, 
of that of 8 gadwells obtained in Feb- 
ruary and March. In Currituck Sound, 



North Carolina, wigeon-grass grows 
among too great a profusion of other 
valuable duck foods to have the import- 
ance attained in less favored localities j 
nevertheless, it is a plant of considerable 
value. Practically 10 per cent, of the 
food of 35 big bluebills collected there 
in November was composed of wigeon- 
grass, as was about the same proportion 
of the diet of 70 little bluebills. 

At Back Bay, Virginia, 17 per cent, 
of the food of 19 pintails collected in 
February consisted of wigeon-grass, 
and at Virginia City, Va., 16 per cent. 
of the food of 14 mallards taken in 
January was of the same composition. 

Other ducks found feeding on wigeon- 
grass are the Florida duck, black duck, 
green-winged and cinnamon teals, spoon- 
bill, canvasback, ringneck, bufflehead, old 
squaw, ruddy duck, surf scoter and 
hooded merganser. 

Description of Plant. 
_ Wigeon-grass (Ruppia maritima) is 
similar in habit to sago pondweed or 
foxtail. Both have long, slender, fila- 
mentous leaves on widely spreading, 
much-branched seems. In wigeon-grass 
the basal parts of many of the leaves are 
enlarged (Fig. 15) and this, upon close 
inspection, gives the plant quite a differ- 
ent appearance from sago pondweed. 
The seeds of sago pondweed are com- 
pactly grouped on a central axis, while 
those of wigeon-grass are borne singly 
on rather long stalks which radiate from 
the top of the fruiting peduncle (Fig. 
16). The latter organ usually is spirally 
coiled in wigeon-grass; in sago pond- 
weed it never has more than a simple 
curve. The rootstock of wigeon-grass is 



20 



THE GAME BREEDER 



tougher than that of sago pondweed, 
more frequently jointed, and often an- 
gled at the joints. There are no tubers. 
The seeds are black, rounded triangular 
in outline, with a small pit on each side 
near the apex, and on one edge an oblong 




Fig. 15 — Wigeon-grass. 

lid which is forced out during germina- 
tion. Pondweed seeds have a similar lid, 
but are usually larger than those of 
wigeon-grass, never black, and lack the 
apical pits. 

Wigeon-grass is usually referred to in 
books as sea or ditch-grass; it is also 
called tassel-grass, tassel-weed, tassel- 
pondweed, nigger-wool, puldoo-grass 
and peter-grass. The last two names 
are compounded from terms by which 
the coot is known in Southern States, 
and indicate that wigeon-grass is highly 
relished by that bird. 

Distribution. 

Wigeon-grass is a brackish-water 
plant. It grows in salt water, but proba- 
bly never in that of full ocean strength. 
It also grows in water that passes for 
fresh, as in the upper part of Currituck 
Sound, North Carolina, but inlets from 
the ocean to this part of the sound have 



existed in recent years and high tides 
at times cross the narrow beach. Salt 
in the soil or salt springs, even if cov- 
ered by fresh water, also give wigeon- 
grass the conditions necessary for exist- 
ence ; this explains its scattering distribu- 
tion in the interior of the country (Fig. 
17). Along the coast wigeon-grass 
occurs from the base of the Alaska 
Peninsula and the Gulf of St. Lawrence 
south to Central America.* 

Propagation. 

Wigeon-grass may be propagated from 
the seeds, which ripen in late summer 
and early autumn. These should be 
gathered with about 6 inches of the 
upper part of the plant, as the foliage 
tends to keep them from drying. This 
material should not be packed in large 
masses, but free circulation of air should 
be provided to prevent fermentation. As 
little time as possible should intervene 
between gathering and planting. If it is 
desired to keep the seeds for some time 
they may be placed in wet cold storage. 

After soaking the seed until it will 
sink, sow broadcast, in quiet but not 
stagnant water over mud bottom. 




Fig. 17 — Fruits of wigeon-grass. 

Wigeon-grass grows in water varying in 
depth from a few inches to 10 feet. It 
should be sown where the water is per- 
manently 1 to 2 feet deep. 



*Authorities hold a variety of views regard- 
ing the number of species of Ruppia which 
occur in this area. The purposes of this pub- 
lication, however, are best served by grouping 
all the forms under one name. 



THE GAME BREEDER 21 
THE PRAIRIE GROUSE. 

Fifth Paper. 

By Dwight W. Huntington. 

The most important vegetable foods prairie hen and the bobwhite abundant 

of the prairie grouse before the prairies food. 

were converted into farms, were the "The prairie hen eats a much smaller 
wild rose, wild sunflower, the sumac and proportion of seeds, with the exception 
the seeds of many weeds and grasses. of grain than the bobwhite. Seeds 
The wild rose hips yielded 11.01 per make 14.87 per cent, of the annual diet 
cent, of the food of the birds examined of these grass seeds form 1.03 per cent.; 
for the purposes of Dr. Judd's bulletin, seeds of various polygonums, 8.49 per 
to which I have referred. The rose, we cent., and miscellaneous weed seeds, 5.35 
should always bear in mind, forms a per cent. When the nature of the 
splendid protection for the birds be- prairie hen's habitat is recalled it seems 
cause the food can be obtained above the strange that the percentage of grass 
snow and no winged or ground vermin seed is so small. The bobwhite takes 
can destroy the grouse when they have 9.46 per cent, of grass seed. "The seeds 
taken refuge in a briar patch. Since the of different polygonums, or smart weeds, 
wild roses and wild sunflowers are highly play an important part in the economy 
ornamental they might be used to ad- of the prairie hen. Thev form 8.49 per 
vantage as borders to the .roads and as cent, of the food. These plants grow 
boundaries of the fields on the great profusely when illy drained regions of 
Western grain farms where the grouse the plains are under water for a few 
should be made a highly profitable food months in the year." I have often found 
crop. When the fields are large wide the grouse on lands such as Dr. Judd de- 
hedges of roses, sunflowers and sumacs scribes and about the margins of sloughs 
might, profitably be used to divide them, where the rails were abundant in the 
Strips of grass should be planted beside reeds and wild rice. An ideal preserve 
the hedges^for nesting sites. for prairie grouse should contain a num- 
The grouse are fond of grain and will ber of sloughs and these, of course, 
procure most of their food in the wheat should yield an abundance of mallards, 
and corn stubbles. When the birds are teal and other wild fowl, including the 
very abundant they should be fed in the canvas backs, red heads and scaups, in 
winter, corn, wheat, or other grains. the northern tier of States, and probably 
Audubon says : "At the approach of as far South as northern Illinois and 
winter these birds frequent the tops of Iowa. 

the sumach bushes to feed on their seeds The prairie grouse, as all sportsmen 
often in such numbers that I have seen know, are fond of the stubbles and the 
the bushes bent by their weight." stomachs of the birds examined in the 
Wild cherries and numerous berries investigation for Dr. Judd's bulletin 
are listed by Dr. Judd, but the percent- contained 31.06 per cent, of grain. Corn 
ages eaten are small, probably because and wheat are the favorite cereals but 
there were few cherries or berries on oats, barley, buckwheat and millet are 
the ground when the specimens were relished. Like other gallinaceous birds, 
taken. "The large percentage of rose the prairie grouse likes mast, but on 
hips eaten may be a useful hint." Dr. many prairies this food does not occur. 
Judd says, "to any one who attempts to The oaks were abundant on some of the 
introduce the bird or improve its environ- good grouse lands in Indiana and Illi- 
ment. It is important to note that often nois where I used to shoot prairie grouse 
when deep snow causes scarcity of other and the mallards as well as the "chick- 
supplies the sumac affords both the ens" had an abundance* of acorns. 



22 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Dr. Judd says : "Like other grouse the 
prairie hen is an habitual browser, to 
the extent of 25.09 per cent, of its food. 
Twigs or Shoots, 0.50 per cent. ; flowers, 
9.34 per cent., and leaves, 15.20 per 
cent." 

Like the ruffed grouse, the prairie 
grouse is fond of fruit buds and when 
abundant the birds may do some dam- 
age to fruit but with an open market 
for grouse the birds will be worth far 
more than the fruit and some apple 
trees might be planted in rows beside the 
hedges of wild roses, sunflower and su- 
mac, especially for the birds. The secret 
of game abundance undoubtedly lies in 
making the ground safe and attractive 
and the great attraction for all game 
birds is an abundance of the foods 
which they like most. 

The prairie hen has a marked taste 
for flowers. A delicate pink rosebud 
had been plucked by a bird shot at Ome- 
ga, Nebraska, in June. More than a 
thousand goldenrod heads were found 
in another. Additional composite flow- 
ers devoured were amphiachyris, sweet 
balsam and others. The grouse eat, also, 
birch buds and the leaves of the butter- 
cup, everlasting, red and white clover, 
and the interesting water milfoil often 
grown in gold fish globes. 

The insect food of prairie grouse con- 
sists largely of grasshoppers. Insects 
constitute one-third of the fare from 
May to October, and grouse are particu- 
larly valuable as an enemy of the Rocky 
Mountain locust. 

One of the best arrangements of the 
land for prairie grouse undoubtedly is 
alternating strips of corn and wheat 
stubble, with broad hedges of wild roses, 
sunflowers and sumac, bordered with 
prairie grass. The land used for the 
hedges will be found to be the most 
profitable land on any farm since in all 
of the prairie States it can be made to 
yield both prairie grouse and partridges 
or quail (the bob whites) . and in some 
regions other species of quail. Having a 
few sloughs with enough water for ducks 
the game easily can be made very profi- 
table. 

The prairie grouse in 1902 brought 



from $3 to $5 a brace. Soon thereafter 
the birds sold for twice as much and the 
birds no doubt will bring such prices for 
many years to come in the New York 
market after next winter when the mar- 
will be opened to a regulated sale of 
this desirable food, no doubt. 

As to the number of grouse and quail 
that can be reared on any given area 
we have no figures since practical pro- 
tection or preserving never has been 
given a fair trial in America. On lands 
planted alternately with maise and corn 
(corn and wheat as we would say) in 
Hungary, tremendous bags of partridges 
are shot every season and thousands of 
birds are netted and shipped to England 
and America. Capt. C. E. Radcliffe has 
written about some big bags which he 
helped make, in Hungary. On one day 
three guns bagged 227 brace of par- 
tridges in less than five hours in a field 
of less than 300 acres. "Had the number 
of guns," he says, "been six or seven the 
bags he refers to would have been more 
than doubled each day, as with such a 
small party the coveys, kept breaking on 
the flanks of the line, and the birds were 
never scattered, nor the covies broken 
up." On the same ground in 1901 a 
party of ten guns bagged 905 brace in a 
day. Since many birds were shot in the 
standing corn and not recovered and 
since an abundance was left after the 
shooting the reader can form an estimate 
of the number of birds inhabiting the 
fields. 

Quail, prairie grouse and wild ducks 
are harmonious and it will be interesting 
to observe how many can be produced 
and sold from the farms in Oklahoma, 
Indiana and other States where the laws 
now permit game breeding. Quail can 
be sold by the thousand at $20 per dozen 
and the common wild ducks sell for $3 
and $4 per brace. There can be no 
doubt about the "chickens" selling at 
from $3 to $5 each in large lots and all 
of these birds are much easier and 
cheaper to rear than pheasants because 
they will find most of their food in the 
fields and sloughs and wild breeding 
birds are not subject to the diseases 
which often decimate the hand-reared 



THE GAME BREEDER 



23 



fowls. The enemies of the grouse and controlled by shooting and trapping. I 
quail will gather quickly when the birds shall refer to these enemies in another 
are made plentiful and these must be paper. 



A BOBWHITE STORY. 

By Rev. C. W. Siegler. 

[The following story about the successful breeding of quail was written to Mr. Clyde B. 
Terrell, one of our Western advertisers by a reader of the Game Breeder. — Editor.] 

locked up on our porch; but two were 
missing. Very likely they were killed 
by the children when chasing and catch- 
ing the others. I kept the birds a few 
weeks longer. They were now full 
feathered and could fly but they never 
thought of leaving our garden. . 

What I feared at length happened. 
One morning I heard a little quail 
screaming loudly for help. When I ran 
out I saw our neighbor's cat after it. She 
had taken all of the birds excepting this 
one. I took it down in a neighboring 
wood but when it continued to call loudly 
for its foster mother I put the bantam in 
a box and carried her down to the wood. 
The quail at once noticed her call and 
went into the box. Evidently it is very 
fond of its foster mother. It is very 
nearly full grown and able to look out 
for itself. 

Now what do you think of our Wis- 
consin law ? Do you not think it should 
be as legitimate to keep game birds in 
captivity as the breeding of any of our 
domestic birds is ? Is it not your opinion 
that our State should have a game 
breeders' law the same as the model 
game law of Indiana? Enclosed I send 
you a copy of this. 

Had the State given me the right to 
keep the quails in captivity I would have 
the entire flock to-day, and I would en-, 
joy having them and saving them for the 
State. But I conserved them for our 
neighbors cat! 

This much I have learned : I can raise 
quail from eggs just as easily as I can 
raise pheasants. 



Let me tell you about my success 
with my quails. A farmer gave me 
fourteen eggs which he found while cut- 
ting grass in the orchard The nest had 
been disturbed and as the eggs were 
right in the pathway they certainly would 
have been stepped on. I took the eggs . 
and put them under a bantam and two 
days later I had fourteen little quail. 
The first two weeks I kept them in 
captivity and fed them small ants and 
their eggs, egg custard, and finely cut 
lettuce. They did well on this food and 
we could see them growing bigger and 
stronger every day. A very happy and 
pretty little flock they were. 

I wrote to the Conservation Commis- 
sion of Wisconsin and asked their per- 
mission to raise the birds, promising to 
report to them frequently to let them 
know what success I had. But they an- 
swered that I must not keep them in con- 
finement but must allow them to run at 
large with the hen. 

I let them run in my garden where 
they became so tame that they would 
follow my children wherever they would 
play. 

I went to Minnesota with my family 
for a two days' visit, and, during our 
absence the quail evidently became very 
lonesome and missed the children. So 
one day they all went over to a neigh- 
bor's house, across the street, and march- 
ed into their summer kitchen, causing 
great excitement. All the children in 
the neighborhood came to help catch 
them and bring them back to my place. 
When I returned home I found the birds 



•-$?• 



24 



THE GAME BREEDER 



QUAIL BREEDING IN WISCONSIN. 

By J. G. Halpin. 
Department of Poultry Husbandry, University of Wisconsin. 



So far as my work with quail is con- 
cerned it has simply consisted of giving 
the necessary attention to the quail at 
times when the feed supply was short, 
but at other times the quail on the refuge 
here on university farm shift for them- 
selves. We have had a few quail on the 
ranges used by the poultry department 
for a great many years. A year ago we 
increased our stock by liberating more 
quail that were furnished us by the game 
warden. I liberated the quail at several 
different times but usually just at night. 
It was surprising how well satisfied the 
most of the quail seemed to be with their 
new quarters and soon found the regular 
feeding grounds. Perhaps I should add 
that at the time when the quail were lib- 
erated there was but little natural feed 
so that I scattered feed quite widely 
near clumps of bushes and trees so that 
the quail soon found it and then learned 
to come to the regular feeding places. 
For feed I have usually used wheat and 
commercial scratch feed, the same as is 
used commonly for laying hens. This is 
made up of about two parts cracked corn, 
two of wheat with a little kafir corn, 



pin-head oats and waste weed seeds. I 
kept some of the quail confined for a time 
but the quail that were liberated behaved 
so well that I made up my mind to turn 
them all at liberty and have been very 
glad that I did. 

My personal opinion is that so far as 
handling quail under conditions such as 
we have here, the principal things are to 
make refuges where the quail will go 
during snow storms, give special atten- 
tion to feeding them during blizzards, 
and then keep after their natural en- 
emies, especially man. The most of the 
articles that I have read have laid a great 
deal of emphasis upon the trouble caused 
by cats and dogs, and other vermin, but 
I feel that man is more likely to cause 
loss than anything else, although of 
course all the other factors must be con- 
sidered. Our principal trouble seems to 
be the illegal hunting by foreigners. If 
we could eliminate this trouble, I am 
satisfied that hundreds of quail would be 
produced on our ranges, the quail would 
feed with the chickens whenever natural 
food was short and would be of practic- 
ally no trouble. 



CUTTHROAT TROUT (Salmo Clarkii) 



The Cutthroat Trout (Salmo Clarkii) 
seems to be the most abundant of the 
fish inhabiting the waters of King 
county, Washington, and is found at 
most any altitude. Its characteristics 
are sufficiently distinctive to make it a 
simple matter of recognition. The Salmo 
Clarkii is named for Captain William 
Clarke of the Lewis and Clark expedi- 
tion, who first described this great trout 
of the Pacific waters. 

Seventy thousand young Cutthroat 
Trout were propagated at the King 
County trout hatchery last year and dis- 
tributed in the various streams through- 
out the county. 



Their habits change with their age. 
The fry, as soon as they have become 
free of the egg sack, live mostly in shal- 
lows at the margins of streams. This is 
their only chance of safety from larger 
and predatory fish. After three or four 
months they are quite able to take care 
of themselves. They seek secluded spots 
where other fish are unable to get and 
there remain until three to five inches 
long. The Cutthroat reaches its matur- 
ity the second year and ranges from eight 
to twelve inches in length. As a rule 
they spawn the second year, but are not 
successful spawners until they have 
reached the third year, and become more 



THE GAME BREEDER 



25 



prolific each year thereafter. During the 
spawning period this fish ascends the 
larger streams to the source and, as a 
rule, congregate in some body of water 
at its very head. If lakes are available 
at the head of streams they will be found 
there in large numbers. They pair and 
go to the spawning beds. The male or 
the female makes a depression in the 
sand and gravel in the bed of the stream, 
there deposits its eggs, covers them se- 



curely and then returns to the larger 
streams. After the eggs are hatched the 
youngster wiggles out through the sand 
and gravel and lingers about the head 
waters, thus keeping away from the 
large fish. No doubt the sportsmen have 
noticed that more small fish are caught 
in the small streams. This is wholly due 
to the fact that the small fish seeks shel- 
ter in small bodies of water, which as a 
rule the large fish does not inhabit. 



THE PRESERVATION OF RAILS, WOODCOCK, SNIPE 

AND OTHER WADERS. 

By The Editor. 

Woodcock and other wading birds serve it! Thousands of ducks also, 

and the rails cannot be hand-reared of migrate from the club preserves and 

course, but they respond nicely to the afford shooting on streams, bays and 

protection given to the wild fowl on other public waters. Nearly, if not quite 

many club grounds. I have seen thous- half of the ducks bred on The Game 

ands of rails and shore birds or waders Breeders' Association grounds on Long 

on many northern preserves where they Island, N. Y., migrated and I heard of 

were bred and where very few are shot some very good mallard shooting miles 

because the ducks which are plentiful away which, undoubtedly, was due to 

prove more attractive to the sportsmen, our breeding mallards in a place where 

One day when I was sketching beside there was no duck shooting before the 

a little pond on a preserve in Northern Association was created. Eggs from 

Ohio, many snipe, yellow legs, rails and this preserve were shipped to New Eng- 

other birds were feeding within a few land and ducks hatched from these eggs 

feet of the place where I was seated, have since produced many eggs which 

Upon another occasion, when I was have been shipped all over the country 

shooting ducks on a preserve in Northern as far West as California. No one was 

Indiana, I decided to give part of a day damaged. Many have been benefited, 

to the snipe and made a big bag in a Every trap shooting club should rent 

very few hours shooting. The rails often the shooting on a few posted farms and 

ran about before my duck blind and a have some good game shooting. The 

friend, who gave an afternoon to rail Wyandanch Club, described in this issue, 

shooting, easily bagged nearly an hun- has grown into an attractive country 

dred birds. There were many thousands club and now has a splendid preserve 

of rails. Since the snipe, rails and wood- quite near New York, where thousands 

cock migrate they furnish shooting for of pheasants, ducks and quail will be shot 

many guns. Were* the marshes not pre- this fall. It formerly was the Brooklyn 

served there would be no place for these Gun Club. The trap shooting is far more 

birds to breed. There seems to be no interesting when it is conducted on 

objection to the draining of the marshes ground where game will be shot later. 

and sloughs for agriculture, which, of All of the game clubs have traps and 

course, puts an end to the breeding of the members enjoy practising at the in- 

thousands of these migrants. How animate targets. Some of the game clubs 

absurd it is for sportsmen to object to arrange with a country hotel for their 

the activities of those who prevent the quarters and have very small annual 

draining of such good ground and pre- dues. 



26 



THE GAME BREEDER 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 



Quail Breeding. 

By John C. Phillips. 

I have only bred Bobwbites but next 
year intend to add California Valley 
quail as I have rather good reports from 
them. 

I have used various types of breeding 
pens from about 3x8 ft. to much larger 
sizes. I cannot see any great advantage 
in the larger pens. I have never tried 
incubators for quail except to start 
along some of the eggs for a week or 
two. 

I do not see profits in quail breeding 
except in selling eggs for I cannot see 
how one is to> trap up more than 50% 
or 75% of his young stock. There is 
very little loss from quail after about 
one week old, much less than pheasants 
and besides vermin is much less likely 
to get them. 

I do not know exactly what numbers 
of birds I have now, but it is very nearly 
as follows : 

Wood duck, about 75 ; other fancy 
ducks, about 50; Various duck hybrids 
for experimental work, 250; pheasants, 
all kinds, about 200; no common pheas- 
ants raised this year; cranes, 25; geese, 
Canada, 30; geese, others, 10; quail in 
pens, 50; outside, 200; turkeys 18. 

Massachusetts. 



Pheasants and Quail. 

Editor of Game Breeder: 

In your July issue we read with inter- 
est the article of Miss Helen Bartlett in 
regard to pheasants not fighting quail. 
I know nothing about this matter where 
the pheasants and quail are at large, nor 
do I know anything about the Valley or 
Crested Quail. Our aviaries are 18x22 
feet each. We know one thing, that you 
can put a pair of Bobwhite quail in a 
pen with a pair of Mongolian and Ring- 
necks, and these little devils will peck the 
eyes out of any pheasant we have ever 
had any experience with. They certainly 
will not do with pheasants, and the 



pheasant certainly has none the best of it 
with Bobwhite. 

Kentucky. R. A. C. 

• 

More Pheasants Wanted. 

The Oregon Sportsman says : "Appli- 
cations have recently been made by other 
States and by game breeders to the Ore- 
gon Fish and Game Commission for the 
purchase of several thousand Chinese 
pheasants. The prices offered are from 
four to six dollars a pair. Who can 
supply the birds ?" Since there is a con- 
tinued demand for more game birds in 
Oregon and in almost every other State 
in the Union, the Fish and Game Com- 
mission wishes to encourage farmers and 
others to propagate wild fowl, especially 
pheasants and quail. 

The best and cheapest way to propa- 
gate, prairie grouse, ruffed grouse and 
quail is in large protected fields and 
woods. The birds will breed in a wild 
state abundantly, provided keepers be 
employed to control their natural 
enemies. Since they will find most of 
their food and when breeding wild are 
free from diseases this is the best and 
cheapest way to produce this food crop. 

New York has a million dollars and 
more which Oregon can have as soon as 
some game ranches are ready to deliver 
the goods. Let The Game Breeder know 
when you are ready to deliver the goods 
and we will steer the money your way. 
There will be no danger of extinction 
under such conditions as we have sug- 
gested. 

"As a matter of fact," said "the law- 
yer for the defendant, trying to be sar- 
castic, "you were scared half to death 
and don't know whether it was a motor 
car or something resembling a motor car 
that hit you." 

"It resembled one all right," the plain- 
tiff made answer. "I was forcibly struck 
by the resemblance." — London Tit-Bits. 



More Game and Fewer Game Laws. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



27 




Mallards bred by C. H Shaw, in California, from eggs shipped from Connecticut The eergs were 
laid by ducks hatched from eggs laid on the Game Breeders Preserve, Long Island, N. Y. 



Breeding Canvas-backs. 

By Arthur M. Barnes. 

You may be interested to know that 
we have here on Mr. William Rocke- 
feller's estate, three canvas-back duck- 
lings. We understand that these are 
the first canvas-backs bred and reared 
in captivity in the United States. As 
the parent stock were hand-reared by 
Air. Herbert K. Job at Lake Winne- 
pegosis, Manitoba, these ducklings are 



evidence that hand-reared birds will 
breed if given a fair chance. 

The ducklings are now ten weeks old 
and have a tank of water six feet long 
as a preparation for being placed on 
the lake. 

The first few days of their life they 
were so wild we feared we could not 
induce them to feed, but as they drank 
freely we sprinkled duck meal on their 
fountain and after swallowing some of 
that, they would eat from the feed-board 




California Preserve where Mr. C. H Shaw will produce the Mallards in lar^e numbers. 



28 



THE GAME BREEDER 



the hard boiled egg and bread crumbs 
we use for the first few days. They are 
not fussy in their diet now, and consume 
quantities of duck meal, rolled oats, let- 
tuce, water cress and meal worms. 

They have posed for the movies but 
are still unspoiled and I trust will be the 
progenitors of a numerous race. 



A Good Award. 

Gold medal and highest award for 
dog foods at the Panama-Pacific Expo- 
sition has been given to Spratt's Patent, 
Newark, N. J. 

Is this surprising when you are told 
that at three (3) shows recently, over 
3,000 prizes were won by dogs fed reg- 
ularly and exclusively on Spratt's Dog 
Foods ? 

The products manufactured by this 
company have been on the market for 
over fifty years. During this period they 
have received the highest honors at all 
the principal national and international 
expositions, a convincing proof that 
merit wins in the long run. 

There are more prize-winners reared 
and fed on Spratt's Dog Foods than on 
all others combined. 

Spratt's Patent will bench and feed 
the Panama-Pacific Dog, Poultry, Cat 
and Pet Stock Shows. These exhibi- 
tions are among the largest and most im- 
portant held in this country and the fact 
that the contracts for all the above men- 
tioned shows have been awarded to this 
well-known firm speaks volumes for their 
up-to-date methods, efficiency, etc. 



Is it a Wonder? 

The new Florida law, which is said to 
vest the ownership of game in the vari- 
ous counties of the State, is certainly 
original. We have not received our copy 
of the law and we will defer extended 
comment until after we have read it. 

It may be that the law will work very 
nicely in the interest of game breeders. 
Farmers who wish to have game farms 
and to own and sell game easily should 
be able to persuade the local authorities 
to let them have some of the county 
property for propagation and when it 
appears in one county that the people 



have the same freedom, that the people 
have in all other civilized, countries, ex- 
cepting the United States, and that they 
are making money from the food pro- 
ducing industry, it seems quite likely 
that the people in other counties may de- 
cide to become free from State game 
politics. Counties which want more 
freedom and "more game" should re- 
joice. Game can be made more profit- 
able than oranges. 



Question of Supplies. 

"Daisy," remarked her Sunday School 
teacher, "don't love your cat too much. 
What would you do if it died — you 
wouldn't see it again?" 

"Oh, yes, teacher; I should see it in 
heaven." 

"No, dear, you're mistaken; animals 
cannot go to heaven like people." 

Daisy's eyes filled with tears, but sud- 
denly she exclaimed triumphantly : "Ani- 
mals do go to heaven, for the Bible says 
the promised land is flowing with milk 
and honey, and, if there are no animals, 
where do they get the milk !" 



We invite the attention of State game 
officers and game breeders to the an- 
nouncement of W. J. Mackensen of the 
Pennsylvania Game Farm printed in the 
advertising pages. Mr. Mackensen 
writes that he has made arrangements 
to secure a large number of wild fowl 
and we have no doubt -he will sell them 

all. 

. ♦ 

Sam and Luke, browsing around, 
crossed the pasture. The Judge's bull 
saw them, and Sam beat him to the fence 
by a single stride with nothing to spare. 
Luke, a bad starter, didn't try for the 
fence ; he stuck to the open. He led the 
bull around the field on the first lap, 
while Sam, from the fence, urged him 
to "a li'l bust er speed." On the second 
lap Sam exhorted him : "Run, niggeh — 
you ain' half runnin' !" The third time, 
Sam yelled : "Make has'e !" Luke risked 
all in his answer. "G'awn, man," he 
gasped, "you doan think Ah'm throwin' 
dis yer race, does yer?" — Credit Lost. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



29 




White indicates areas where game breeding is permitted. Shaded indicates areas where game 
breeding is not yet encouraged by legislation. North Carolina has county laws and readers of 
The Game Breeder produce and shoot thousands of quail every season in some of the counties. 
No one seems to know what all the laws are. 



The Game Breeding States. 

The area where it is no longer criminal 
to profitably produce game is now large 
enough to keep the markets full of this 
desirable food during a long open sea- 
son. Breeders in other States should 
have access to the best market, New 
York, and they, no doubt, will when the 
matter is properly presented to a federal 
court. 

Minnesota. 

Minnesota has taken advanced ground 
in the matter of game propagation. While 
we have not, as yet, entered into the 
raising of game as a State enterprise, 
the game refuge plan has been adopted 
as a fixed plan and the propagation of 
game by private parties is to be en- 
couraged. The Minnesota law permits 
the sale of game raised in captivity under 
domesticator's permit and I am sending 
you copy of same for your reference. No 
one has, as yet entered into the business 
of game raising in this State for com- 
mercial purposes. 

I am convinced that the private breed- 
ing of game by furnishing a source of 
supply for those who wish to eat it, 
would naturally result in more wild game. 
CARLOS AVERY, 

Commissioner. 



Making the Best Of It. 

"I don't know what would happen if 
i died suddenly." 

"Well — I've got my black silk dress." 
— Exchange. 



The Fixin's. 



A kindergarten teacher, after explain- 
ing to her much interested class that 
birds have feathers, bears have fur, 
sheep have wool, etc., asked the ques- 
tion : "Now, who can tell me what 
oysters have." 

A bright little girl, very eager to re- 
cite answered, "Crackers." — National 

Monthly. 

• 

The Stoney Lonesome Game Farm, 
Heywood and other advertisers also be- 
lieve there will be a big demand for wild 
ducks and wild duck eggs. 



The Game Breeder : 

Enclosed find check for advertisement. 
I have had good results through The 
Game Breeder. 

G. H. Harris. 

Taylorville, Ills. 



30 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T*?f Game Breeder 



Published Monthly 



Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 



NEW YORK, OCTOBER, 1915 



TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy— $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, $1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc., 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R Peixotto, Treasurer, 

J. C. Hcntington, Secretary. 

Telephone, Beekman 3685. 

VALUABLE LESSONS. 

Several lessons may be learned from 
reading Mr. Barton Warren Evermann's 
excellent paper, "An Attempt to Save 
California Elk." These valuable wild 
food animals were tremendously abund- 
ant in California not long ago. We re- 
member reading stories of how the ranch- 
men easily procured the animals with the 
lasso. The development of agricultural 
operations and the increase in population 
seemed to indicate that the California 
elk were doomed to extinction. As they 
became rare the temptation to shoot them 
on sight increased. Jim Paine, the old 
Suisun marsh hunter, claims that he 
killed the last tule elk ever seen on the 
Suisun marsh. He was sculling up the 
Cordelia Slough, when, near what is now 
Teal Station, he saw a large cow elk 
plunge into the slough just ahead. Scull- 
ing alongside, he killed the animal with 
a heavy load of duck shot. Many others, 
no doubt, can claim to have killed the. 
last elk in their neighborhood. 

It is most fortunate that Mr. Henry 
Miller, of the Miller & Lux ranch, deter- 
mined that the elk should be preserved 
on the property of his company. No 
game laws would have saved the animals 
had it not been for the orders given by 
Mr. Miller to preserve the elk. It ap- 
pears from the story that the elk are 
very destructive in farming regions. 



Miller & Lux estimated that the animals 
they preserved did from $5,000 to $10,- 
000 worth of damage every year to the 
alfalfa and Egyptian corn fields and to 
the fences. It is evident that the farm- 
ers should not be required to preserve 
elk at such cost on their farms as sport- 
ing animals for licensed trespassers. 

We learn from the article, also, that 
the elk multiply rapidly when they are 
properly looked after; that they can be 
distributed to restock public parks and 
private ranches where the owners are 
willing to have elk for sport or for prof- 
it. When Miller & Lux decided to dis- 
pose of their elk they properly made the 
offer upon condition that the animals 
should be put only in places affording a 
favorable environment and where they 
would probably breed. 

Elk as well as deer can be kept plenti- 
ful in public parks where the people are 
permitted to enjoy a limited amount of 
regulated shooting. They can be made 
very abundant both for sport and for 
profit on private ranches now that the 
breeders industry is encouraged by leg- 
islation. The people of California should 
learn to keep restrictive game laws from 
interfering with game breeding. The elk 
and game birds owned by the public on 
public lands and waters may well be pro- 
tected by laws limiting the bag and the 
season and prohibiting shooting, when 
this seems to be necessary. Game owned 
by individuals within their own fences 
should not be governed by laws which 
make it not worth while to preserve the 
game. 

We predict it will not be long before 
the California markets are abundantly 
supplied with venison and quail, grouse, 
and the other desirable wild foods. The 
State has an excellent game Commission 
which understands the subject. 



QUAIL AT THE BORDER. 

Most of our live quail now come from 
Mexico. Last year the Biological Sur- 
vey decided to hold quail at the border in 
order to see if they had any diseases. No 
surer way of giving diseases to quail can 
be devised than holding them in small 
crates in a hot climate. As we predicted 



THE GAME BREEDER . 31 

would be the case, some of the quail be- for prorit. Wild turkeys sell readily for 
came sick, when the importation of quail from $15 to $25 each and the eggs sell 
suddenly was ended. It is such perform- for $12 and $15 per dozen. Why should 
ances by some members of the Biologi- not the breeding of wild turkeys for 
cal Survey which bring the whole Sur- sport and for profit be an attractive in- 
vey into scandal and disgrace. The in- dustry in the South? 
telligent scientists who have studied the We can remember the time when many 
foods of game birds ; the relations of people went West and bred cattle and 
the natural enemies to game, and other sheep on inexpensive lands and found 
important questions should not be con- the industry profitable. We believe any- 
founded with those who seem determined one who will undertake the practical 
to prevent the importation of game and protection of the wild turkeys on the in- 
who seem to take the most delight in expensive lands of the South will find 
fanciful laws restricting sport in the this industry far more profitable than 
hope that the game may at least be kept the breeding of cattle and sheep ever was 
out of the markets where it should be in the best days of this industry when 
abundant. the lands were cheap. 

We sincerely hope the nonsense on the The wild turkey responds nicely to 

Mexican frontier will not be repeated practical protection. We saw a lot of 

this season. There can be no honor in these birds which were imported from 

discovering a disease when the discoverer Austria and sold alive in America at 

knows that he has caused it. excellent prices. Recently we endeavor- 

. ed to get a few hundred wild turkey 

wtt n t TTPK-TTV RPFTrnTwr e &S s for one of our readers at S 1 - 00 

WILD TURKEY BREEDING. £ach but we wgre unaWe tQ secure them 

In an able and interesting monograph, Anyone who will protect the wild tur- 

"The Wild Turkey and Its Hunting," k eys f rom their natural enemies can 

reviewed on another page, Mr. Edward ma ke them very plentiful on the land re- 

A. Mcllhenny, one of our Louisiana f er red to and we will guarantee to sell 

members, says: "There are thousands t h e birds and eggs at very satisfactory 

of acres in the South which were once prices. 

cultivated, but which are now abandoned Anyone who will protect the birds and 
and growing up with timber, brush, and advertise the shooting can count on get- 
grass. Such country affords splendid t i ng excellent returns since the quail and 
opportunity for the rearing and perpetu- w ild duck shooting can be made excel- 
ation .of the wild turkey. These lands i ent on the same ground and we often 
are vastly superior for this purpose than h ave inquiries from readers as to where 
are the solid primeval forests, inasmuch t hey can go and find good shooting in 
as they afford a great variety of sum- the South. 

mer food; such as green, tender herb- • 

age, berries of many kinds, grasshoppers THE SIZE OF THE VICTORY. 

by the million, and other insects in The law mills having finished grind- 

which the turkeys delight. Such a coun- ing out the new laws in most of the 

try also affords good nesting retreats States, it is now possible to determine 

with briar patches and straw where the the size of the "more game" victory, 

nest may be safely hidden, and where Two-thirds of the States have enacted 

the young birds may secure safe hiding laws permitting the breeding and sale of 

places from animals and birds of prey ; all or certain species of game and game 

but alas ! at present not from trappers, fish. 

baiters and pot hunters. Check these and We like best the laws which have 
the abandoned plantations of the South avoided the words, "in captivity," be- 
soon would be alive with turkeys." cause we are somewhat inclined towards 

The lands Mr. Mcllhenny refers to are field sports and we do not care much 

cheap. It would be an easy matter to about "in captivity" bied or tame game, 

start wild turkey breeding for sport and "The wilder the better" is one of our 



32 



THE GAME BREEDER 



pet phrases, and this not only applies to 
the game in the fields and woods for 
sporting purposes but also to game on 
the table as food. 

Since the State game officers in States 
which have enacted game breeders laws 
have good common sense it is hardly 
likely that any breeder will be arrested 
because his game is not bred in hot- 
houses or unhealthy inclosures. The 
truth of the matter is that the wild bred 
birds are the cheapest as well as the best, 
and, of course, many of them will fly out 
of the "noisy sanctuaries" when game 
breeding is undertaken for sport. 

Good game laws like bad ones seem to 
be contagious and we predict that the 
game breeders enactments will be in the 
books of every State within the coming 
year or as soon as the various legisla- 
tures meet again. 

The victory is a big one. Very soon 
it will be made complete. The readers 
of The Game Breeder are to be con- 
gratulated upon what they have accom- 
plished. It is evident that "they did it." 
No other sporting magazine has done 
more than to remain respectfully silent. 
It is evident that the laws are the best 
in the States where The Game Breeder 
has the largest circulation and that the 
State game officers who have been long- 
est on our subscription list have done the 
best work in helping the "more game" 
movement on its way. 



CORRESPONDENCE. 

The Game Breeder : 

Enclosed please find $1.00 for sub- 
scription. I am with you. There is no 
chance for game around this part of the 
world, unless it becomes a commercial 
asset to the owner of the land. 

My theory is the more game a farmer 
has on his land in Connecticut to-day, the 
more bonfires, cut fences and trespassers 
he has, and that's all. The automobile 
hunters think nothing of covering forty 
miles to get at a covey of quail or par- 
tridges. I am convinced if you want 
game in Connecticut you must make it 
money in the farmer's pocket and that 
the game shall live on his land; and to 
do this you must either permit him to 



sell the shooting, i. e., the birds alive, 
or else permit him to shoot them him- 
self and sell the birds dead. If anybody 
with an automobile and a three dollar 
gun could go out and shoot a cow be- 
cause he found it in the woods, my own 
impression is there would not be many 
cows in Connecticut. W. S. P. 

Connecticut. 

You are right. Most farmers prefer 
not to have game as bait for trespassers. 
This is one of the reasons why the game 
vanishes. It is an absurdity to say that 
the State owns the game and to license 
trespassers to shoot up the farms with- 
out the consent of their owners. All 
naturalists agree, also, that if any shoot- 
ing is permitted the natural enemies of 
the game and the dogs, cats, rats and 
other vermin must be controlled to make 
a place for the shooting. Otherwise 
nature's balance is upset and the game 
must disappear. Make it worth while 
to look after the game; to protect it 
from its enemies and from climatic 
losses; to feed it in Winter and quickly 
it will become abundant and remain so 
although many deer and birds be shot and 
sold every season. Sport has nothing to 
fear from an abundance of game. The 
shooting has been made good on many 
inexpensive places. — Editor. 



The Game Breeder: 

I have not as yet received the last issue 
of The Game Breeder, which I thought 
perhaps was lost through the mails. 

I will be pleased to receive a copy of 
same as I am interested in the propaga- 
tion of wild game and your magazine 
has many interesting items which are 
valuable to any person raising game. 

Jos. W. Turner. 

Illinois. 

. •-= 

We are gratified to learn that a num- 
ber of game farms and preserves will 
start next season with over a thousand 
stock birds. The more the better, of 
course. We have secured the game 
keepers for a number of these places; 
one will have nearly 5,000 stock birds at 
the start, we are told. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



33 



BOOK REVIEWS. 

The Wild Turkey and its Hunting. By Ed- 
ward A. Mcllhenny. Illustrated. Doubleday 
Page & Co. Net, $2.50. 

The author evidently was well equipped to 
■write the best book on the wild turkey. He 
began hunting turkeys when a mere lad and 
says, "the fondness for this sport has remained 
with me through life." His book proves that 
he has "a fair knowledge of their language, 
their habits, their likes and dislikes," and that 
he has right to his belief that he "has killed 
as many old gobblers with patriarchal beards 
as any man in the world." 

The distinguished naturalist, Dr. R. W. 
Sherfeldt, has contributed two interesting and 
authoritative chapters to the book on the tur- 
key prehistoric and historic. These add much 
to the value of the work. The author takes 
us to the woods and tells us about the habits 
of the birds, shows us their nests and the 
eggs which the hen never neglects to cover 
with leaves to protect them from predacious 
beasts and birds, particularly from that "ubi- 
quitous thief and villain, the crow." We are 
told about the strutting and fighting cocks, 
about the natural enemies of the game, about 
bow to call and shoot turkeys and how the 
author has spent many delightful days in 
their successful pursuit. There are many ex- 
cellent photographs of the birds from life with 
the forest back grounds. 

There are many facts interesting to game 
breeders. "It has frequently been stated," the 
author says, "that the wild turkey will not 
live and propagate within the haunts of man. 
This depends upon how the birds are treated. 
No bird or animal can survive eternal persecu- 
tion. There is no trouble about the birds 
thriving in a settled community, if the proper 
territory is set apart for their use, and proper 
protection given. The territory should con- 
sist of a few acres of woodland, or of some 
broken ground, thicket or swamp to afford a 
little cover. In such a retreat, a trio of wild 
turkeys may be turned loose, and in a few 
years, if properly protected, the vicinity would 
be stocked with them." The author says the 
wild turkey has no fear of the peaceable 
farmer at the plow, no more than the crow or 
the black bird has, and he describes the shoot- 
ing of an old gobbler which crossed a field 
where a plowman was continually "hollering 
to his mules, 'Whoa,' 'Gee,' or 'Haw.'" 
_ We are told that the turkeys are still plenti- 
ful in the Southern States, and "there are 
thousands of acres in the South which were 
once cultivated, but which are now abandoned 
and growing up with timber brush, and grass. 
Such country affords splendid opportunity for 
the rearing and perpetuation of the wild tur- 
key." Game breeders and good sportsmen will 
find this book especially interesting and in- 
structive. 



Great Scot. 

A writer in the N. Y. Herald expresses 
the wish, that there could be a Flex- 
ner report on the Scots and how they 
came to, and whether they owe their 
great place in the world and in literature 
and the hearts of men to poverty, the 
Presbyterian religion, whiskey or oat- 
meal. 

We shall be pleased to hear from some 
of our Scotch game keepers who are 
making American game abundant. 



No Violation. 

"Here," cried the fish warden, "what 
are you doing? Don't you know you're 
not allowed to catch fish here ?" 

The angler, who had sat three hours 
without a nibble, turned and surveyed 
the official sourly — "I'm not catchin' 
'em," he retorted peevishly; I'm feeding 
'em." 



An Astronomical Dog Store. 

"Is this a high-bred dog?" 

"Yes, madam; he's a skye terrier." 

"Isn't he just heavenly?" 

"He's the star of our collection, 
madam — the dog star, I might say." 

No doubt the bitch was named, Gam- 
ma Virginis. 

. «■ . 

In the Trade. 

Retired Painter and Decorator (to 
artist, whom he has commissioned to 
paint his daughter's portrait) — And none 
o' your slapdash painting for me ; three 
good coats, mind yer. — The Bystander. 



Trouble for the Gardener. 

"The sparrows seem to be getting at 
these peas, John. Couldn't you put up 
some kind of scarecrow?" 

"Scarecrow wouldn't be no use, Miss. 
Why, if you was to stand there yerself 
all day, I doubt of ye'd keep 'em off." — 
London Opinion. 



More game and fewer game laws. 



A Staggerer. 

Young Wife (four weeks married) — 
Good gracious reproaching me already 
because I have bought a new hat. Is it 
going to be like this -every month? — 
Fliegende Blatter. 



34 . THE GAME BREEDER 



Wild Duds! :-: WHd Ducks! 

AN IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT 

/ have good reason to believe that the next season 
will be a big wild duck season, and that the demand 
{or wild ducks and eggs will be far greater than ever 
before. There are more inquiries {or wild ducks. 
The Spratts report rapidly increasing sales of wild 
duck foods. The Game Breeder reports many inquiries 
for these birds and there were large sales of eggs 
last spring. 

To meet this demand for wild ducks, I have made 
arrangements to procure the birds, both wild trapped 
and hand-reared ducks. Now is the time to order 
stock birds for the next season. Orders will be filled 
in the order in which they are received. Send your 
orders now, stating if you prefer wild trapped birds 
or hand-reared birds. 

MACKENSEN GAME PARK 
W. J. Mackensen 

YARD LEY, PENNA. 

P. S. — / also have Deer, Wild Turkeys, Pheasants, 
Partridges , Quail and all other game. 



In writing to advertiser s please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



:+ 



THE GAME BREEDER 



35 



Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Hungarian Partridges 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders 
for these birds and for years I have filled 
practically all of the large State orders for both 
Partridges and Pheasant^. 








. ^ty ,*&r-r- 



Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners 

1 carry ihe largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 best 
Royal Swans of Englniid. I have fine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES, PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have 60 acres 
of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER, LLAMAS, RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — it will pay you to do go. Your visit solicited. 
I am only 60 miles from New York and 30 miles from Philadelphia. 




Department V. 



WNL J. MACKENSEN 

YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 



36 



THE GAME BREEDER 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 2 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 



THE GAME 

150 Nassau Street 



BREEDER 

New York City 



DOGS 



NORWEGIAN BEAR DOGS. IRISH WOLFHOUNDS, 
English bloodhounds, Russian wolfhounds, American fox- 
hounds, lion. cat. deer, wolf, coon and varmint dogs. All 
trained. Shipped on trial. Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded. Purchaser to decide. Fifty page highly 
illustrated catalogue. 5 c. stamp. ROOKWOOD KEN- 
NELS, Lexington. Kentucky. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 

offer for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer Rounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, bear and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, hiehly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin. 

AIREDALES — THE GREAT ALL 'ROUND DOG- 
Collies of the best possible blood, beautiful, intelligent; 
have puppies, grown dogs and brood matrons Send for 
large list. W. R. WATSON, Box 711, Oakland, Iowa. 

DOGS TRAINED AND BOARDED. BEST AR- 
ranged kennels in the South, located on 10,000 acres 
leased hunting grounds ; forced retrieving taught dogs of 
any age ; my methods never fail ; thirtv years' experience. 
JESS M. WHAITE, Cyrene, Decatur Co., Ga. 



CHESAPEAKE BAV DUCK RETRIEVERS— THOR- 
oughbred Stock—Bred and raised on the James River 
and Chesapeake Bay. Shot over almost every day of the 
Duck Shooting Season. Dogs and puppies for sale. Just 
right to break this Fall. JOHN SLOAN, Lee Hall, 
Virginia. 



FOX, COON, SKUNK AND RABBIT HOUNDS 
broke to gun and held and guaranteed The kind that 
are bred and trained for hunting by experienced hunters. 
Fox, coon and rabbit hound pups from pedigreed stock, 
and extra fine ones, price S5.00 each. Stamp for photo. 
H. C. LYTLE Fredericksburg. Ohio. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



RUFFED GROUSE WANTED. STATE PRICE. 
A. I. W., care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, 
New York. 

WANTED-ACORNS. STATE PRICE PER BUSHEL. 
A. I. W., care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, 
New York. 

WHITE'S PRESERVE -WILD CELERY AND ALL 

kinds of wild duck food, plants and seeds. Also enter- 
tain sportsmen. Waterlily, Currituck Sound, North Caro- 
lina. 



SPECKLED TROUT OIL PAINTINGS, 
"ARTIST MARTIN," Girard, Pa 



1.00 EACH. 



GUARANTEED GERMINABLE WILD RICE SEED. 
Shipment in September for fall sowing Shipped wet as 
recommended by the Department of Agriculture. Supply 
limited. Order at once. ROBERT CAMPBELL, Keene, 
Ontario. 



PHEASANTS FOR SALE— 60 PAIRS OF ENGLISH 
Pheasants for sale. $4.50 the pair ; $200 takes the 
bunch. C. T. KIMBALL, Beloit, Wisconsin. 



LIVE GAME 



PHEASANT AND JAPANESE PHOENIX FOWL 
Eggs lor sale; several varieties. S. V. REEVES, 114 
E. Park Ave., Haddonfield. N. J. 

GET WISE— RAISE PHEASANTS FOR PASTIME. 
Profitable and fascinating Send for prices. CON- 
NECTICUT FARMS PHEASANTRY, Union, Union 
County, N. J. 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 

other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 
WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
antry and Game Park. 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now — the surest way to start 
breeding this species. We are the oldest and largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country Black and White 
Swans. Wild Ducks, etc , for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island. Va. 

WILD TURKEYS— For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks. 
County, Pa. 

FOR SALE— Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. dot) 

CASH PAID FOR PEA FOWLS. State age and sex. 
Will buy qoo Ring Necks, 100 Amherst. 100 Goldens, ico 
Reeves. State your best price. HELEN BARTLETT, 
Cassopolis, Michigan. 

PEACOCKS. ALL KINDS OF PHEASANTS, WHITE 

African Guineas, for sale, pure blooded, non-related. I 

will buy Amherst, Reeves and Pea fowls. JOHN TAL-- 

BOT, South Bend. Indiana. o-i4-6m. 

FOR SALE — PEACOCK, each $6.00; MAMMOTH 
Flemish Rabbit $4.00 a pair at six months. Angora 
rabbit $:t 00 a pair. Pigeons : silvered pouters $5 00 a 
pair, white fantails $2.00, white dragon $2 00. red homer 
$1.00. J. J. GAREAU, St. Roch l'Achigan, Quebec Can. 

PHEASANTS OF NINE VARIETIES; STOCK AND 
eggs. Ringneckscontractable by the thousand. DAISY 
FARM, San Lorenzo, California. 

PHEASANTS WANTED. ONLY RARE VARIETIES 

such as Tragopans. Manchurian. Firebacks, Impeyans, 

etc. Kindly quote price. A. J. MERLE, Alameda, Calif. 

WILD MALLARD DUCKS— DECOYS ; GOOD FLY- 
ing strain. 100 birds, $110.00 ; 12 birds, $15.00 ; (less, 
$1.»7H eachl, no limit. Order now and from this adver- 
tisement. Send draft. Shipped Mondays. Eggs in sea- 
son, $10 00 hundred, March 1 to July 15. C. E. BREMAN 
CO., Danville, 111. 

WE HAVE A FINE LOT OF PINIONED PHEAS" 
ants for sale. Prices on application. THURSTON 
COUNTY GAME FARM, Olympia, Wash. H. W. 
Myers, Supt., R. F. D. No. 1. 

PHEASANTS— Having plenty of breeding stock. Golden, 
Silver and Ringneck Pheasants, I would take a position 
on a Private Estate or Club to raise game, commercial or 
otherwise. W. M.. care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau 
Street, New York City. 

YOUNG GOLDEN PHEASANTS FOR SALE at 
reasonable prices. C. SIEGLER, Bangor, Wis. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for MoteGa 



THE GAME BREEDER 



37 



WILD MALLARD DUCKS-RAISED AND REGIS- 
tered in old Wisconsin. Eggs $1.25 per 12 ; birds $1.50 
each. Excellent decoys. Order now. E.G. SHOWERS, 
Onalaska. Wisconsin. 

PHEASANTS FOR SALE. GOLDEN, SILVER AND 
Ringneck. Buff cochin bantams for brooding. All 
selected stock. MR. W. MARSH, Cold Spring Harbor, 
L. I., New York. 

5 VARIETIES OF PHEASANTS. Wild Mallards. 
Wild Geese and game. Fourteen varieties of stand- 
ard Poultry, including Turkeys. Also Elk. List free 
G. H. HARRIS, Taylorville. 111. 

OUR WILD MALLARDS ARE BRED FROM STOCK 
owned by State of New York. Raised under natural 
surroundings. The best that money can buy. Write for 
prices. ROY E. McFEE, Canajoharie, New York. 

FOR SALE— GROUSE, QUAIL AND PHEASANTS 
Also mixed bantams for pheasant mothers. Nothing 
better for the purpose. SO cents each. O. R. AUSTIN'. 
Foster Center, R. I. 



GAME BIRDS WANTED 

I AM IN THE MARKET FOR CALIFORNIA MOUN- 
tain partridges and masked Bob-whites. F. A., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New York. 



WANTED:- RINGNECK PHEASANTS 
In answering, state full number of cocks and hens 
you can supply, if old or young birds, price per 
pair and also price if whole lot is taken. M. W., 
Box 5, Care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., 
N. Y. City. 



PHEASANTS WANTED 
I am in the market for 100 Chinese or English ring- 
neck pheasant hens not less than 15 weeks old or 
over one year. No objections if pinioned. Two 
Reeves cocks, four hens; two Amherst cocks, four 
hens. State price and delivery. J. F. GAMMETER, 
Portage Heights Game Farm, Akron, Ohio. 



SWINHOES 
WANTED — Swinhoes. State price and number. R. A. 
CHILES & CO., Mt. Sterling, Ky. 



GAMEKEEPERS 



HEAD GAMEKEEPER OR SUPERINTENDENT— 
wanted by experienced man as above, 20 years' first-class 
character in England and America. Understand raising 
of all kinds of Game and Ducks, training and management 
of Dogs, trapping of all kinds of Vermin. B, care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 

POSITION WANTED AS SUPERINTENDENT OF 
large estate or game preserve by a professional forester 
and gamekeeper. Very capable man with fish and game 
production of all kinds ; also breeding and training sport- 
ing dogs. Excellent trapper. Highly recommended. 
Address SUPERINTENDENT, care of the Game Breed- 
er, 150 Nassau Street, New York. 

GAMEKEEPER — LIFE EXPERIENCED REARING 
land and water fowl, training and handling high class 
shooting dogs, conditioning for shows. A-l rearing pup- 
pies, well up in veterinary, competent manager of club or 
private estate. Distance immaterial. J. H. W., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 

GAMEKEEPER— WANTS SITUATION FOR NEXT 
season. Skilled in pheasant and duck rearing. Will be 
open for employment January 1st. Reason for changing 
position is desire to get a change of climate for family 
A. E. JAMES, care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St.. 
New York City. 



HEAD GAMEKEEPER, SCOTCH, WANTS SITUA- 
tion. Thoroughly experien«ed in rearing pheasants, 
wild ducks, turkeys and partridges; 26 years' experiente. 
Can be highly recommended. R. J. M., care of The Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New York. 

GAMEKEEPER REQUIRES SITUATION, UNDER- 
stands all duties. Best references from Europe and 
this country. Address M. F.. care of The Game Breeder, 
'50 Nassau Street, New York. 

EXPERIENCED UNDER KEEPER WANTED FOR 
Private Estate. Single man, age 20 to 24. Applv to 
T. B., care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New 
York City. 

HEAD GAMEKEEPER, SCOTCH, WANTS SITUA- 
tion. Thoroughly understands Pheasant and Wild Duck 
raising, (will rear Pheasants by contract). Incubators, 
management of deer, rearing and training of dogs, vermin 
trapping. Well recommended. Address W. S., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 



POSITION WANTED 
PHEASANTS — Having plenty of stock, would take 
position raising game for club or private estate. W., 
care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New 
York, N. Y. 



WANTED- SITUATION 
As Superintendent or Manager on a game farm or 
preserve. Experienced in game and poultry breeding. 
Good reason for desiring change of location. Would 
take an interest in a game farm to breed game com- 
mercially. Address C. McM., office of The Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New York City. 



SITUATION WANTED 
Wanted situation as gamekeeper. Experienced in 
wild duck rearing and pheasants; the trapping of 
vermin, and dog breaking. Apply H. H., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



SUPERINTENDENT.- Wanted, by experienced man, 
25 years, first-class references from large estates and 
game farms where 3,000 pheasants have been penned and 
20,000 raised yearly. Understand the raising of all kinds 
of game and wild duck, management of incubators, testing 
of eggs, trapping of vermin, training and management of 
dogs and all duties making of rabbit warrens. W. B., 
care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



WANTED— EXPERIENCED POULTRYMAN 
Wanted experienced poultryman for fancy water 
fowl and chickens, farm near New York City. Pre- 
fer man and wife, German, French, Holland or 
Scotch descent, sober, and satisfactory references 
required. Address T. M., care of Game Conserva- 
tion Society, 150 Nassau Street New York, N. Y. 



WANTED— POSITION AS GAMEKEEPER. 
Thoroughly understand breeding Pheasants, Duck and 
other game. R. J., care of The Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau Street, N. Y. City. 



GAME BREEDING FARM WANTED 
Wanted to purchase or rent a small place in one 
of the Eastern States where game breeding is legal. 
A small farm with a pond and stream is desired. 
State price and location. M. A. C, care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



PIGEONS 



BEST HOMERS AND CARNEAUX PIGEONS TIME 
and money can produce. Pictures and description free. 
Write NATIONAL SQUAB FARM, Itasca, Texas. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



38 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Game Birds 

I am offering for immediate delivery 
the following hand-reared birds. These 
birds are in every way extra choice, being 
thoroughly acclimated, requiring no 
housing in the winter and most desirable 
for breeding in the coming Spring. 

Genuine WILD Mallard ducks $5.00 per pair 

Decoy Mallards 3.00 " " 

Wood duck 16.00 " " 

Mated Canadian geese 10.00 " " 

Also Pintails, Black duck, Widgeon, 
Red-heads, Blue-bills. Greer- and Blue- 
Winged Teal, etc., and several varieties 
df Wild Geese. 

RING NECK Pheasants $5.50 per pair 

Golden Pheasants 15.00 " " 

Also Silver, Amherst, Reeves Pheas- 
ants and Common Bantams for pheasant 
rearing. 

Safe Delivery Guaranteed. 

JOHN HEYWOOD 
Box B Gardner, Mass. 




FISHEL'S FRANK. 



The Best in 
Pointers 

Puppies, Broken Dogs 
and Brood Bitches, by 
Champion Comanche 
Frank, Fishel's Frank 
and Champion Nicholas 
R. 

Write me your wants, please. 

U. R. FISHCL 
Box 35 HOPE, IND. 




Wild Water Fowl 

» "Our Specialties/' 

Wood Ducks, Mandarins. Wild Black 
Mallards for stocking game preserves. 
Safe delivery guaranteed. 500 Can- 
ada Wild Geese, $8.00 to $10.00 per 
pair. Australian, South American, 
Carolina Swans. 200 trained English 
Decoy Ducks, guaranteed Callers and 
Breed*. rs, $5.00 per pair. Egvs, 15 for 
$2.00. Mallards and Canada Geese 
must be bought NOW to breed this 
Spring. For prices of other wild fowl 
apply to 

WHEALTON WILD WATER-FOWL FARMS 
Chincoteague Island, Virginia 




\A/E are now offering for imme- 
diate delivery at low prices our 
own hand-reared pheasants, ducks and 
geese. Also a good pair of shooting 
dogs, game, chickens, etc. 

SPENCER BROTHERS 

Kaolin P. O., Pennsylvania 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



39 



rrrfrmnE! 




HER£ULES <j!qPOWDEJ{jCa 



The Propagation 
of Wild Birds 

By HERBERT K. JOB 



PRICE $2.00 



We pay delivery charges 



THE GAME BREEDER 

1 50 NASSAU STREET NEW YORK 













THE LURE OF WILD RICE 

bring Ducks hundreds of miles— my Wild Rice 
Seed for planting is the finest of the year— also 
Wild Celery, Wapato, and other natural foods 
that Ducks love. 

Terrell's Famous Wild Fowl 

Strong, healthy, fresh from their native haunts — 
for breeding or stocking purposes. I have the 
Wild Fowl that are considered best in the 
country. Mallards, Black Ducks, Canvasbacks, 
Wood Ducks, Pintails, Teal, Geese, Pheasants, 
etc., and Wild Mallard eggs in Spring from 
birds of strong flying strain. 

Write for My Free Instructive Booklet. 

CLYDE B. TERRELL 

Naturalist 
Department P OSHKOSH, WISCONSIN 



NOW IS THE TIME 

If you expect to have fertile eggs next 
spring, buy your birds now ; don't wait until 
midwinter or next spring ; if so you will be 
disappointed. 

We Offer, Immediate Delivery. 

Silver, Golden, Blueneck, Lady Amherst, 
Reeves, Elliotts, Ringneck, Mongolian, 
Swinhoe, Versicolor, Impeyan, Manchurian 
Eared and Melanotus Pheasants. We are 
now booking orders for spring and summer 
delivery of any of above varieties as well. 
We also have for sale S. C. Buff and Blue 
Orpington and R. I. Red Japanese Silkies 
and Longtails. Wild turkeys. Gray, black 
mallard, pintail, redhead, gadwall and other 
varieties of ducks. Also Blue Peafowl and 
White Peafowl. 

WANTED 

White peahens. In Pheasants any of the 
Tragopans, Firebacks, Cheer, Soemmering, 
Elliott.White Crested Kalij, Peacock, Ander- 
son's Linneatus. Also Canvasback Ducks, 
Garganey and Ring Teal. In writing quote 
number, sex and lowest cash price. 

We will on receipt of 20 cents in stamps 
send colortype catalog of pheasants. 

CHILES & CO., ML Sterling, Ky. 



40 



THE GAME BREEDER 



(bo |bo 

When you've hunted through from dawn 

To the setting of the sun, 

You're tired and you're sleepy 

But -you've got to CLEAN YOUR GUN. 

You hate the task of rubbing till 

The barrel will come clean, 

But that's because you've never used 

OUR LBO. 

We do not like to brag, 
But "a bit of twisty rag," 
When you use it with a little of 

OUR LBO 

Will save you all your rubbing 
Your scraping and your scrubbing. 
So you'd better come to us and save 

YOUR LBO. 

A lubricant Nitro Solvent and 
Rust Remover. 

Any dealer or by mail, 25 Cents. 

LBO COMPANY, Port Richmond, N. Y. 
■bo |bo 




The teacher was holding up a picture 
of a zebra. "Now, children, what is 
this?" 

"It looks to me like a horse in a bath- 
ing suit," answered little Arthur. — Har- 
per's Magazine. 


"What is your name?" a Kentuckian 
asked a negro boy. 

"Well, boss," he answered, "every- 
where I goes they give me a new name, 
but my maiden name was Moses." — 
Everybody's. 


"Why do you sign your name 'J- John 
B. B. B. Brownson'?" asked Hawkins. 

"Because it is my name," said Brown- 
son. "I was christened by a minister 
who stuttered." — Australasian. 


FOR SALE. 

1 pair of Wild Turkevs. 1 pair Snow Geese. 1 pair Blue 
Wing Teal, 1 pair Green Wing Teal, 1 Pintail drake, 
also Amherst, Golden, Ring-neck, Reeves, and Silver 
Ph.63.Scints 

H. W. SCHULTZ, Middleton, Mich. 









STONY LONESOME GAME FARM 

Mallard Ducks and 
Mongolian Pheasants 

We offer for immediate delivery (limited number) of 

Mallard Ducks and Mongolian Pheasants 

and will take orders for eggs, delivery in the spring. 

ADDRESS 

1 29 Pront Street, New York City, 

or JOHN POSTER, West Hartland, Connecticut 



REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE, a Tract of land suitable 
for a game park or preserve* 
Contains 2500 acres, two lakes, trout 
streams, part cleared, balance wood- 
land* Timber alone is worth the 
price asked for the land* 

This tract is well suited for a 
Game Breeding Association or Shoot- 
ing Club* It is located on the Dela- 
ware River, not far from Port Jervis* 

There are a number of buildings 
suitable for Club purposes* 

We have other properties adapted 
for Game Breeding Associations and 
Shooting and Fishing Preserves* 

For Particulars address 

W* G* LYNCH 

The W* G* Lynch Realty Co* 

Long Acre Building - - New York 




BIG 

GAME 

RIFLES 

Superior 

in "Hang," Action and Accuracy 

AS SOON as Sportsmen got to asking Why and How about rifles, 
A\ Remington-UMC High Power Rifles came into their own. 

To-day Remington-UMC High Power Big Game Rifles are in 
demand more than ever — by the leading crack shots and by the great 
body of Sportsmen, who are quite as able to tell a good gun when they 
see it perform as any professional expert. 

The Remington-UMC dealer in your community — he's the man to go 

to for these rifles. He makes it a point to show the guns that his best 

customers want. 

Ask to see Remington-UMC High Power Slide Action Repeaters, six shots, 
solid breech, hammerless, safe. Autoloading Rifles — Five shots, simply press 
trigger for each shot. Solid breech, hammerless, positive safety device. 

REMINGTON ARMS-UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO. 

WOOLWORTH BLDG. (233 Broadway) NEW YORK CITY 



MAH 12 1921 




Single Copies 10 



^ T H E^ 



G All f: Btt 




VOL. VIII. 



NOVEMBER. 1915 




The- Object of this magazine- is 
to Make- North America the 5iggest 
Game Producing Country in the World 




CONTENTS 



Survey of the Field -"More Game "in Connecticut— Good Game 
Laws in Connecticut— Quail and Deer in Yonkers— The Protective 
Association Bulletin— Noisy Refuges— Quail Clubs— Hand-rearing 
Quail Breeding — Song Birds— Game Law Activities — When is a 
Wild Duck? — Feeding Important — Wild Duck Distinguished- 
Worth Seeing— Poison for Gophers. 

The Fur Seals - - Wilfred H. Osgood, Edward A. Preble and 

George H. Parker 

A Deer Trouble - - Warren R. Leach 

The Woodmont Rod and Gun Club - - Henry P. Bridges 
The Nation and Criminal Jokes By the Editor 

Regulations for Quail Import Permits - U. S. Dept. of Agriculture 
Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves - By Our Readers 

Outings and Innings. 

Editorials— A Quail Note— Dead Birds— A Good Dinner— The Fur 
Seal Fisheries - From Bad to Worse— Let the Qimil Come In. 
Book Reviews, Trade Notes, Etc. 



C* 



liMllillillllllillinl-.illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllimiillllllllllllllUIIIIIIII llllillllillllllllllllllllllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHti 

PUBLISHED BY 

THE" GAiifr CONSERVATION SOCIETY, Inc 



NEW YORK CITY U.S. A >**,;-/, 

rri n i m 1 1 u u i n i ; m . : m m ■ l l t ; i j . j i n m J < m i ! j ; ; : . ; . . ; i i n i ■ n i ■ n j J J n n m [ j j n ; i n t 1 1 r r ;r j ) n 1 1 f m 1 1 m , k I : ) \7 n f i ! : ! i i i i : ; r ■ r ; : r : , m f fTn V , n J J J rfj M j f 




SPA 



WIRE - COOPS - TRAPS 

Wire 

For Deer Parks, Rearing Fields and Kennels 

Coops and Hatching Boxes 

Traps 

For Ground and Winged Vermin 

Egg Turners, Egg Boxes for Shipping 

And all Appliances for Game Farms and Preserves 



I shall be pleased to correspond with game breeders 
who wish to purchase wire, coops, traps or any appli- 
ances for the game farm and preserve. 

Special advice given to all contemplating the game 
breeders' industry. 



F. T. OAKES 

Room 622 
150 Nassau Street New York, U. S. A. 

I do not sell live deer and game birds, or eggs 



THE GAME BREEDER 



41 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 2 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 

THE GAME BREEDER 

150 Nassau Street New York City 



LIVE GAME 



PHEASANT AND JAPANESE PHOENIX FOWL 
Eggs lor sale; several varieties. S V. REEVES, 114 
E. Park Ave., Haddonfield. N. J. 

GET WISE-RAISE PHEASANTS Fc R PASTIME. 
Profitable and fascinating Send for prices. CON- 
NECTICUT FARMS PHEASANTRY, Union, Union 
County, N. J. 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 
other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 
WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
antry and Game Park. 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now — the surest way to start 
breeding this species. We are the oldest and largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country Black and While 
Swans.Wild Ducks, etc .for sale. WHE ALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island. Va. 

WILD TURKEYS— For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. J MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County, Pa. 

FOR SALE— Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (iot) 

CASH PAID FOR PEA FOWLS. State age and sex 
Will buy soo Ring Necks, 100 Amherst. 100 Goldens, 100 
Reeves. State your best price. HELEN BARTLETT, 
Cassopolis, Michigan. 

PEACOCKS. ALL KINDS OF PHEASANTS, WHITE 
African Guineas for sale, pure blooded, non-rs-lated. I 
will buy Amherst, Reeves and Pea fowls. JOHN TAL- 
BOT, South Bend. Indiana. q-i4-6m. 

FOR SALE — PRACOCK, each $6 00; MAMMOTH 
Flemish Rabbit $4.00 a pair at six months. Angora 
rabbit $:t 00 a pair. Pigeons : silvered pouters $5 00 a 
pair, white fantails $2.00, white dragon $2 00. red homer 
$1 06. J. J GAREAU, St. Roch l'Achigan. Quebec Can. 

PHEASANTS OF NINE VARIETIES; STOCK AMU 
eggs. Ringneckscontractable by the thousand. DAISY 
FARM. San Lorenzo, California. 

PHEASANTS WANTED. ONLY RARE VARIETIES 

such as Tragopans, Manchurian, Firebacks, Impeyans, 

etc. Kindly quote trice A J MERLE, Alameda, Calif. 

WILD MALLARD DUCKS-DECOYS ; GOOD FLY- 
ing strain. 100 birds, $110.00 ; 12 birds, $15.00 ; (less, 
$1.S7J4 each\ no limit. Order now and from this adver- 
tisement. Send draft. Shipped Mondays. Eggs in sea- 
son, $10 00 hundred, March i to July 15. C. E. BREMAN 
CO., Danville, 111. 

WE HAVE A FINE LOT OF PINIONED PHEAS- 
ants for sale. Prices on application. THURSTON 
COUNTY GAME FARM, Olympia, Wash. H. W. 
Myers, Supt., R. F. D. No. 1. 

PHEASANTS — Having plenty of breeding stock. Golden, 
Silver and Ringneck Pheasants, I would take a position 
on a Private Estate or Club to raise game, commercial or 
otherwise. W. M. , care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau 
Street, New York City. 

YOUNG GOLDEN PHEASANTS FOR SALE at 
reasonable prices. C. SIEGLER, Bangor, Wis. 



WOOD DUCKS AND MALLARDS 
FOR SALE— Wood ducks and wild mallards for 
breeding stock ; fine decoys GLENN CHAPMAN. 
Midway, Copn. 



DEER FOR SALE 
Seven Tame Northern Wisconsin Deer. Bucks and 
Does, $25.00 each F. FERRON, 416 Wisconsin 
Avenue, Oak Park, Illinois. 



DOGS 



NORWEGIAN BEAR DOGS. IRISH WOLFHOUNDS, 

English bloodhounds, Russian wolfhounds, American fox- 
hounds, lion, cat. deer, wolf, coon and varmint dogs. All 
trained. Shioped on trial. Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded Purchaser to decide. Fifty page highly 
illustrated catalogue, 5c. stamp. ROOKWOOD KEN- 
NELS, Lexington, Kentucky. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 

offer for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer nounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, bear and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixiy page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin. 

AIREDALES —THE GREAT ALL 'ROUND DOG- 

Collies of the best possible blood, beautiful, intelligent ; 
have ouppies, grown dogs and brood matrons Send for' 
large list. W. R. WATSoN, Box 711, Oakland, Iowa. 

DOGS TRAINED AND BOARDED. BEST AR- 
ranged kennels in the South, located on 10.000 acres 
leased hunting grounds ; forced retrieving taught dogs of 
any age ; my methods never fail ; thirtv years experience. 
JESS M. WHA1TE, Cyrene, Decatur Co., Ga. 

FOX, COON, SKUNK AND RABBIT HOUNDS 
broke to gun and field and guaranteed The kind that 
are bred and trained for hunting by experienced hunters. 
Fox. coon and rabbit hound pups from pedigreed stock, 
and extra fine ones, price 95 00 each. Stamp for photr. 
H. G LYTLE. Fredericksburg. Ohio. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

WHITE'S PRESERVE— WILD CELERY AND ALL 
kinds of wild duck food, plants and seeds. Also enter- 
tain sportsmen. Waterlily, Currituck Sound, North Caro- 
lina. 

SPECKLED TROUT OIL PAINTINGS, $3.00 EACH. 
"ARTIST MARTIN," Girard, Pa 

PHEASANTS FOR SALE-50 PAIRS OF ENGLISH 
Pheasants for sale. $4.50 the pair ; $200 takes the 
bunch. C.T.KIMBALL Beloit, Wisconsin. 

FOR SALE. 
1 pair of Wild Turkeys. 1 pair Snow Geese, 1 pair Blue 
Wing Teal, 1 pair Green Wing Teal, 1 Pintail drake, 
also Amherst, Golden, Ring-neck, Reeves, and Silver 

Ph63. SiLIltS 

H. W. SCHULTZ, Middleton, Mich. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours foe Mote Game." 



42 



THE GAME BREEDER 



WILD MALLARD DUCKS— RAISED AND REGIS- 
tered in old Wisconsin. Eggs Si. 25 per 12 ; . birds $1 50 
each. Excellent decoys. Order now. E.G. SHOWERS, 
Onalaska, Wisconsin. 

PHEASANTS FOR SALE. GOLDEN, SILVER AND 
Ringneck. Buff cochin bantams for brooding. All 
selected stock. MR. W. MARSH, Cold Soring Harbor, 
L. I., New York. 

5 VARIETIES OF PHEASANTS. Wild Mallards, 
Wild Geese and game. Fourteen varieties of stand- 
ard Poultry, including Turkeys. Also Elk. List free. 
G. H. HARRIS, Taylorville, 111. 

OUR WILD MALLARDS ARE BRED FROM STOCK 

owned by State of New York. Raised under natural 
surroundings. The best that money can buy. Write for 
prices. ROY E. McFEE, Canajoharie, New York. 

FOR SALE— GROUSE. QUAIL AND PHEASANTS. 
Also mixed bantams for pheasant mothers. Nothing 
better for the purpose. 50 cents each. O. R. AUSTIN, 
Foster Center, R. I. 



GAME BIRDS WANTED 

I AM IN THE MARKET FOR CALIFORNIA MOUN- 
tain partridges and masked Bob-whites. F. A., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New York. 



WANTED:- RINGNECK PHEASANTS 
In answering, state full number of cocks and hens 
you can supply, if old or young birds, price per 
pair and also price if whole lot is taken. M. W., 
Box 5, Care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., 
N. Y. City. 



PHEASANTS WANTED 
I am in the market for 100 Chinese or English ring- 
neck pheasant hens not less than 15 weeks old or 
over one year. No objections if pinioned. Two 
Reeves cocks, four hens; two Amherst cocks, four 
hens. State price and delivery. J. F. GAMMETER, 
Portage Heights Game Farm, Akron, Ohio. 



SWINHOES 
WANTED — Swinhoes. State price and number. R. A. 
CHILES & CO., Mt. Sterling, Ky. 

GAMEKEEPERS 

HEAD GAMEKEEPER OR SUPERINTENDENT— 

wanted by experienced man as above, 20 years' first-class 
character in England and America. Understand raising 
of all kinds of Game and Ducks, training and management 
of Dogs, trapping of all kinds of Vermin. B, care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York. 

POSITION WANTED AS SUPERINTENDENT OF 
large estate or game preserve by a professional forester 
and gamekeeper. Very capable man with fish and game 
production of all kinds ; also breeding and training sport- 
ing dogs. Excellent trapper. Highly recommended. 
Address SUPERINTENDENT, care of the Game Breed- 
er, 15c Nassau Street, New York. 

GAMEKEEPER— LIFE EXPERIENCED REARING 
land and water fowl, training and handling high class 
shooting dogs, conditioning for shows. A-l rearing pup- 
pies, well up in veterinary, competent manager of club or 
private estate. Distance immaterial J. H. W., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150. Nassau St., N. Y, City. 

GAMEKEEPER—WANTS SITUATION FOR NEXT 
season. Skilled in pheasant and duck rearing. Will be 
open for employment January 1st. Reason for changing 
position is desire to get a change of climate for family 
A. E. JAMES, care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., 
New York City. 



HEAD GAMEKEEPER, SCOTCH, WANTS SITUA- 
tion. Thoroughly experieneed in rearing pheasants, 
wild ducks, turkeys and partridges; 26 years' experience. 
Can be highly recommended. R. J. M., care of The Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau Sireet. New York. 

GAMEKEEPER REQUIRES SITUATION, UNDER- 
stands all duties. Best references from Europe and 
this country. Address M. F.. care of The Game Breeder, 
150 Nassau Street, New York. 

EXPERIENCED UNDER KEEPER WANTED FOR 
Private Estate. Single man, age 20 to 24. Applv to 
T. B., care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New 
York City. 

HEAD GAMEKEEPER, SCOTCH, WANTS SITUA- 
tion. Thoroughly understands Pheasant and Wild Duck 
raising, (will rear Pheasants by contract), Incubators, 
management of deer, rearing and training of dogs, vermin 
trapping. Well recommended. Address W. s , care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 



POSITION WANTED 
PHEASANTS— Having plenty of stock, would take 
position raising game for club or private estate. W., 
care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New 
Yoik, N. Y. 



WANTED— SITUATION 
As Superintendent or Manager on a game farm or 
preserve. Experienced in game and poultry breeding. 
Good reason for desiring change of location. Would 
take an interest in a game farm to breed game com- 
mercially. Address C. McM., office of The Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New York City. 



SITUATION WANTED 
Wanted situation as gamekeeper. Experienced in 
wild duck rearing and pheasants ; the trapping of 
vermin, and dog breaking. Apply H. H., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



SUPERINTENDENT. -Wanted, by experienced man, 
25 vears, first-class references from large estates and 
game farms where 3,000 pheasants have been penned and 
20.000 raised yearly. Understand the raising of all kinds 
of game and wild duck, management of incubators, testing 
of eggs, trapping of vermin, training and management of 
dogs and all duties making of rabbit wairens. W. B., 
care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St , N. Y. City. 



WANTED— POSITION AS GAMEKEEPER. 
Thoroughly understand breeding Pheasants. Duck and 
other game. R. J., care of The Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau Street, N. Y. City. 



GAME BREEDING FARM WANTED 
Wanted to purchase or rent a small place in one 
of the Eastern States where game breeding is legal. 
A small farm with a pond and stream is desired. 
State price and location. M. A. C, care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



Robinson Crusoe's Island Outdone! 

ST VINCENT ISLAND, FLA., in the Gulf of 
Mexico, containing over 13,000 acres of pine for- 
est, fresh water lakes, grassy savannahs, wild boar, 
native Virginia and Osceola deer, also imported 
India deer, wild cattle, turkey, millions of ducks and 
all varieties of fish. The Island with bungalows, 
hunting lodges, yacht, boats and vehicles for sale 
to close an estate. Easily protected. Many thou- 
sand acres of forest pine trees. Booklet sent on 
request. For information inquire V. M. PIERCE, 
663 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



43 



Du Pont for Ducks 

The duck season's here. This year the 
sport is better than ever. The bays are 
black with these toothsome American 
game birds, and there's plenty for all. 
Get your gun ready. Hike out ! If your 
aim is true and your loads dependable, 
you'll get your share. Insist upon 




Smokeless Shotgun Powders 



DU PONT 



The powders that win 
and each has its friends 

Du Pont Powders — the choice of 80 per cent of American shooters 
are loaded in all standard shells, or sold in bulk at your dealer's. 

E. I. Du Pont De Nemours & Company 

WILMINGTON DELAWARE 




BALLISTITE 

Bulk or dense; Each has its good points 



Heating and Cooking Stoves for 
Clubs and Cottages 

The Camp Cook Stove 



This is an ideal cook stove for the 
Mining, Lumber and Military 
Camps; will work just as well in 
the open air as indoors. 

Construction Companies working 
arge gangs of men will find this 
well suited to their requirements. 




A FEW OF THE LEADING STOVES FURNISHED 



Radnor Ranges 
Home Victor Ranges 
Victor Cook Dobule Oven 

Ranges 
Hotel Ranges 
Royal Victor Ranges 
No. 10 Ironsides Cook 
Patrol Wood Stove 
No. 90 Ironsides 
Haddon Ranges 



Index Heating Stoves 
Solar Kent Heating 

Stoves 
Prompt Ranges 
Cozy Ranges 



Home Victor Hot Water Stoves 

Farmer Girl Cook 

New H. A. Elm Double Heaters 

Vulcan Double Heaters 

Tropic Sun Heating Stoves 

Haddon Hercules Heating Stoves Victor Cook Ranges 

Ormond Ranges Loyal Victor Ranges 

No. 15 Hot Blast Heating Stoves Victor Hotel Ranges 

Victor Gem Cook Elm Ranges 

Laundry Stoves Farmer Boy Cook Stoves 

.Manufactured by —— 



Our Friend Cook Stoves 
Sentry Wood Stoves 
Home Victor Cellar Furnaces 
Home Cellar Furnaces 
Victor Cellar Furnaces 
Victor Solar Cellar Furnaces 
Farmer's Furnaces and 

Cauldrons 



S. V. REEVES, 45 N. 2nd St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



44 



THE GAME BREEDER 




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T h ! Game Breeder 

Published Monthly. Entered as second-class matter. July q, iqts, at the Post Office, New York City, 

New York, under the Act ot March 3, i8jq 



VOLUME VIII 



NOVEMBER, I9J5 

CD 
SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER 2 



"More Game" in Connecticut. 

Mr. E. C. Converse will make his 
1,500 acres near Greenwich, Connecticut, 
a bird sanctuary to aid the new national 
movement for the conservation of bird 
life. 

The World, N. Y, says "the work will 
include the raising of wild ducks and the 
winter feeding and protection of insec- 
tivorous birds, this including the setting 
out of nesting boxes and lessening the 
enemies of birds' life. 

"Quail and grouse will be protected 
from human hunters and other enemies. 
Systematic feeding will prevent deaths 
by starvation in severe winters. 

"Wild ducks will be raised upon an 
extensive scale and measures taken to 
make the lake of 100 acres especially at- 
tractive to wild breeding pairs. The 
squirrels, which now infest the great 
stretches of woods, will be kept in 
check." 

It is fortunate that Connecticut has a 
Game Breeders' law and that there is no 
danger of any one being arrested for 
having birds "in possession." 

Good Game Laws in Connecticut. 

Mr. G. H. Scranton, Chairman of the 
Legislative Committee of the Connecti- 
cut Fish ar.d Game Protective Associa- 
tion, properly placed the law permitting 
the propagation and sale of wild fowl, 
pheasants and deer at the head of his 
game law changes in making the report 
for his committee. The fact that the bag 
limit on wild hares and rabbits (except 
Belgian or German hares) is now tem- 
porarily five per day or thirty-five per 
year and the other bag limit and season 
laws are interesting of course to the old- 
time restrictionist and proper enough 



even if the laws are not executed. The 
only objection we ever had to such laws 
was that they tended "to protect the 
game off the face of the earth" if breed- 
ers were not excepted from the restric- 
tions. The exception, as Mr. Scranton 
points out, has been made in so far as 
all wild fowl, deer and pheasants are 
concerned. It will not be long we hope 
before quail and grouse can be given the 
chance to become abundant and cheap. 

Quail and Deer in Yonkers, N. Y. 

Yonkers adjoins the great City of 
New York on the north. Street cars run 
between the two cities and it is difficult 
to tell where the greater city ends and 
the smaller one begins. 

We had long known that there were 
quail in Van Courtland Park, a New 
York City Park which adjoins Yonkers. 
Not long ago we read a story about a 
Yonkers officer who went Quail shooting 
in New York City and was arrested for 
shooting within the city limits. 

Recently a story was printed in the 
New York papers about the deer in- 
vading the Yonkers gardens, upsetting 
garbage barrels and becoming such a 
general nuisance that the telephone bells 
in police stations were kept ringing by 
those who demanded policemen to "shoo" 
the deer off their premises. 

In another clipping sent to The Game 
Breeder the quail are said to "infest 
many of the trees in the northern sec- 
tions of Yonkers, and their musical call 
of 'Bob-White' can be heard from early 
morning until night-fall." 

Since it is out of the ordinary for deer 
to eat abundantly from garbage cans in 
back alleys and to require the attentions 
of policemen, and since it is unusual for 



46 



THE GAME BREEDER 



quail to whistle "bob-white" from the 
tree tops all day long in the autumn, at 
least, when it is too cold for nesting and 
the love notes of the bird, these two im- 
portant matters were referred to the 
standing committee on^ nature fakes and 
fakers at the last board meeting of the 
Game Conservation Society. The com- 
mittee was instructed to proceed to 
Yonkers by subway and trolley and to 
report on the remarkable phenomena. 

The Protective Association Bulletin. 

The new issue of the bulletin of the 
American Game Protective Association 
is a very good one. It opens, naturally, 
with an article expressing the wish of 
the association that the test of the con- 
stitutionality of the migratory bird law in 
the Supreme Court may result favorably. 
A long list of other protective associa- 
tions which have endorsed the law is 
given. There is a picture of the three 
canvas backs, reared in captivity, which 
were pictured on the cover of the Octo- 
ber Game Breeder. The bulletin has at- 
tempted to surround the ducks with a 
water background with a few rocks in 
the foreground. The artistic effort does 
not add to the value of the photograph. 

There is a list of the birds owned by a 
few State game farms and by a very few 
of the readers of The Game Breeder. 
This is termed a game census. 

Noisy Refuges. 

The editor of the bulletin will be in- 
terested to learn that many readers of 
The Game Breeder now shoot, every 
season, in "noisy refuges," as many quail 
as are produced in a year by the com- 
bined efforts of all those named in the 
bulletin. We have seen the records of 
thousands of quail shot on some inex- 
pensive places in a few days. We ex- 
amined the stock birds left in the fields 
and in some cases they were too abund- 
ant. Although many are driven out and 
are shot by local and visiting gunners, 
there is no donger of extinction, because 
always there are plenty of quail left after 
the shooting season ends — not for ver- 
min, but to nest in quiet and produce 
their kind for another year's shooting. 
The interesting part of the matter is that 



the shooting is now going on and has 
been for some years, and the birds show 
an increase in numbers every season. 
This is far better than to live in the 
hope that "in time" some "quiet refuges" 
will produce some birds which may come 
out and be shot. 

We have pointed out often that the 
number which will come out of a "noisy 
sanctuary" is much bigger than the num- 
ber which will come out of the "quiet 
refuges" so persistently advocated by the 
bulletin. To be candid, we like the noise 
both inside and outside of the noisy 
sanctuary better than the quiet hope that 
some day there may be something doing 
around the border of a refuge if all the 
farms are not posted. 

There is room enough, however, for 
all sorts of experiments and we are in 
favor of more posted farms or refuges 
for those who like them, only asking 
that they be not opposed to the noisy 
places which really take up a smaller 
area than the area of the farms where 
no shooting is permitted. 

Quail Clubs. 

Our readers now have many quail 
clubs where the dues are small enough 
for any one. They range from $2.00 up. 
On the $2.00 ground they have some 
pheasants, and rabbits galore. 

Fifteen dollar clubs are becoming 
fashionable and some of these have 
ruffed grouse. Fifty dollar clubs and the 
hundred dollar clubs, where good, big 
bags are made, are well worth the money. 
One or two dollars per week is not very 
much to pay for good shooting during a 
long, open season. When the game can 
be sold in the New York markets the 
dues should be much reduced, of course. 
We are more and more convinced that 
the best way to have plenty of quail at 
small expense is to breed them wild in 
fields made safe and attractive. Some 
very interesting experiments will be 
made on new grounds in several States 
the coming season. 

We are not opposed to the interesting 
hand-rearing experiments conducted by 
our readers. Any little helps to produce 
"more game." We are interested, also, 
in many small commercial breeders ; in 



THE GAME BREEDER 



47 



many small clubs as well as in the bigger 
places where the game is always so plen- 
tiful that much of it should be sold. 

Hand-rearing. 

One of the best articles in the bulletin 
is a description of hand- rearing by Mal- 
com Dunn ; but both Malcom and his 
talented father, Duncan Dunn, will agree 
with us, no doubt, that the gray part- 
ridges abroad are best handled when 
breeding wild in vermin-proof fields and 
that our partridges or quail on proper 
ground can be best handled in this 
manner. 

Mr. D. H. Selden, who has been breed- 
ing quail for twelve years, says he per- 
mits his hand-reared quail to run with 
their foster mother in a large enclosure 
and well adds, "the larger the range of 
captive birds the better, and plenty of 
cover should be provided — in other 
words imitate Mother Nature as much 
as possible." 

Quail Breeding. 

Mr. E. A. Quarles has an article about 
breeding quail in small numbers and says 
"every sportsman cherishes the fond 
hope that some day we shall be able to 
produce quail by the thousands at com- 
paratively small expense, as the ring- 
neck pheasant is turned out to-day, and 
turn them out to stock millions of acres 
of untenanted covers." We have never 
found pheasant breeding inexpensive. 
He refers to the fact that the covers have 
been destroyed on many farms and says 
even when given good cover bobwhite 
must have adequate protection and be 
shot with due consideration to the spar- 
ing of a stock sufficient to furnish breed- 
ers for another year. The hope is ex- 
pressed that it may be possible in time 
to turn game birds loose with good ex- 
pectation that sufficient will survive from 
year to year to furnish some sport to 
the man who cannot afford a club or 
private preserve. The idea is that when 
quiet refuges (more posted farms) are 
established some birds may come out and 
be shot if the foxes and other vermin do 
not get them. As we have pointed out 
they should not be shot since these are 
vermin's stock birds left to produce food 
for another season. 



Song Birds. 

The bulletin has a well illustrated de- 
partment for song and insectivorous 
birds and evidently intends to aid the 
good work of the National and State 
Audubon Associations. The Game Con- 
servation Society leaves the protection 
of song and insectivorous birds to these 
associations and has started a depart- 
ment for "setters, pointers, hounds and 
other sporting dogs." 

Game Law Activities. 

Much space is devoted to those who 
are interested in securing more game 
laws — Mr. J. R. Hickman, of the Mis- 
souri league, for example, reports that 
the league was organized for State-wide 
work. "We had," he says, "to get into 
the legislative fight for good game laws 
the week after our organization. So you 
see we were born a-fighting and it looks 
as if we must keep it up if we want to 
get anything worth while." 

Our readers can only hope that the 
people who wish to have "more game" 
can be excepted from the restrictions and 
that a little amendment permitting game 
breeding soon can be enacted in Mis- 
souri ; that it will become permanent and 
popular as such amendments are in other 
States where game breeders are not re- 
quired to get into the annual "fighting" 
over game laws. 

When is a Wild Duck? 

The above question is asked in a 
Washington dispatch to the Sun, N. Y., 
September 9. 

Professor T. Gilbert Pearson, in an 
interview said: "When you go to a 
hotel and look down the bill of fare 
where it says $6 and then order 'wild 
duck,' how are you going to know it is 
wild?" 

Professor Pearson says you can't tell. 
He has got the gourmands guessing by 
his declaration that half the "canvasback 
ducks" for which you pay from $3 to $6 
are merely "typographical errors" on 
the bill of fare. He has confided to 
some of the bird sharks that most of 
the wild ducks on the hotel menus were 
raised in a yard and a pond with a wire 
fence around them. He positively de- 



48 



THE GAME BREEDER 



fies anybody to tell the difference when 
the waiter brings them in. 

Just because a wild duck is wild is 
no reason, Professor Pearson says, why 
it should taste any better than a tame 
"wild duck" which has abandoned his 
wild ways and settled down into a plain 
garden variety, businesslike duck. He 
says men are making money raising 
"wild ducks" and that the National As- 
sociation of Audubon Societies is en- 
couraging the industry as a means of 
preserving the game. 

The Feeding Important. 

Professor Pearson is right in saying 
there is no reason why a wild duck 
should taste better than a "tame wild 
duck." It is all a question of feeding. 
Some "tame wild ducks" taste better 
than some "wild ducks" and there is a 
great difference in the taste of wild 
ducks of the same species taken in dif- 
ferent localities. The mallard in some 
places on the Pacific Coast when it has 
been feeding' on shell fish and other fish 
is said not to be very palatable. The 
mallard fed on wild rice and acorns 
and cereals in the Mississippi Valley is 
one of the best table birds in the world. 
The canvasback when feeding on wild 
celery, wapato and other desirable foods 
is a famous delicacy but the canvasback 
when feeding on fish and other undesir- 
able foods is practically worthless on the 
table. 

We once reared some mallards on 
corn and later removed them to a pond 
in the woods where they found acorns, 
water lilies and other wild foods. The 
birds were excellent food, of course. 
Mallards reared in a barnyard on corn 
should be no better food birds than the 
common barnyard ducks are. Wild 
foods of the right kind undoubtedly 
make the best meat in the opinion of 
those fond of game. It is an advantage, 
therefore, to have the birds strong on 
the wing so they can fly about and pro- 
cure many desirable wild foods in addi- 
tion to the grain ration given them to 
attach them to the home pond. The 
wilder the birds the better they are, not 
only for food but for sport. The laws 



should contain no "in captivity" non- 
sense. 

Wild Duck Distinguished. 

An epicure will have little difficulty in 
distinguishing a canvasback from a 
mallard on the table. The redhead duck 
more often is served as a canvasback 
and is not as easily distinguished. We 
believe the blue-winged teal when feed- 
ing right is a better food bird than any 
of those just named. The teal is easily 
distinguished by its size and does not 
breed readily in confinement or in small 
enclosures. It should be bred wild be- 
side a marshy pond protected from ver- 
min. 

Worth Seeing. 

The Madison Square Garden Poultry 
Show will have its 27th annual exhibi- 
tion December 31 to January 5, inclu- 
sive, and if the expectations of Mr. 
Charles D. Cleveland, Secretary-Superin- 
tendent, are realized, it will be the big- 
gest and highest class show in the his- 
tory of this premier annual convention 
'of American poultrydom. The Garden 
Show includes in its range of exhibitions 
not only domesticated poultry, but rare 
wild birds, and game birds of many spec- 
ies. The practice of the poultry breed- 
ers as well as the game breeders of the 
future, promises to be a combination of 
producing domesticated poultry as well 
as game birds and the great American 
ben will hereafter have a new province, 
that of being a foster mother to all of 
our feathered game. 

Poison for Gophers. 

The North Dakota Experiment Station 
advises a poison for gophers. Complaint 
was made that this poison killed prairie 
chickens. The station offers $10 to any- 
one who can produce evidence that a 
single prairie chicken has been killed by 
this poison when made as directed. — 
Rural New Yorker. 



Our readers should go to the Poultry 
Show, December 31-January 5, Madison 
Square Garden, N. Y. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



49 



THE FUR SEAL. 

By Wilfred H. Osgood, Edward A. Preble and Geo. H. Parker. 



Document No. 820, The Fur Seals 
and Other Life of the Pribolof Islands, 
Alaska, in 1914, from Bulletin of Bureau 
of Fisheries, is an important pamphlet 
containing 172 pages of text and num- 
erous maps and half-tone illustrations. 
In the Spring of 1914, at the instance 
of the Secretary of Commerce, steps 
were taken to send three investigators 
to th Pribolof Islands to examine and 
report on the condition of the fur seal 
herd, Wilfred H. Osgood, Edward A. 
Puble and George H. Parker, and the 
report is valuable and entertaining. 

"The effect of pelagic sealing," we 
are told, "has been the subject of much 
discussion." During the period from 
1880 to 1911 approximately 900,000 
skins were secured and marketed by the 
pelagic sealers. From three to five seals 
were killed and every one retrieved and a 
large percentage were females whose un- 
born pups perished and whose pups on 
land were left to starve, and the total 
losses ran well into the millions. In 
every season since 1890, the recorded 
pelagic catch exceeded the land catch, 
so that during this period of steady de- 
cline of the herd even the primary losses 
due to pelagic sealing were greater than 
those of land killing. 

A Valuable Property. 

To those familiar with the seal herd 
during periods of expansion it may seem 
small at present but the observer who 
sees it now for the first time can not 
fail to be convinced that it is still a large 
and exceedingly valuable property. We 
have a herd of nearly 300,000 seals un- 
der practically complete control on both 
land and sea. 

"The herd," we are told, "is now be- 
yond the danger point." "A law re- 
stricting killing does not guard against 
the cupidity of any private individual 
or any Government employee, because 
under the new system no one can gain 
by excessive killing under private leas- 
ing, whether or not irregularities existed, 
it is conceivable that the system might 



have offered temptation to dishonest 
parties ; but under full governmental ad- 
ministration circumstances can scarcely 
be imagined in which individual officers 
could derive personal profit at the ex- 
pense of the goverment's interest." 

Flexible Regulations Desirable. 

"The nature of sealing as a business 
is such that restrictions of a fixed and 
absolute character are highly imprac- 
ticable. Living animals, subject to the 
ravages of disease, to the wounds of 
natural enemies, to the vicissitudes of 
an unusually stressful existence, and to 
the varying breeding habits cannot be 
successfully managed under inflexible 
rules laid down long in advance. The 
establishment of closed seasons for game 
animals, especially those of the deer 
family is quite a different matter from 
the killing of fur seals. If all the elk, 
caribou, or antelope living came annu- 
ally to a Government reservation when 
they could be enumerated and propor- 
tioned as to age and sex, there would be 
no reason to prohibit the killing of males 
not needed as breeders." The same may 
be said of the polygamous pheasants 
the breeders should and do kill the cock« 
not needed as breeders. 

"The fur seal," the report says, "is by 
nature and habits almost strictly com- 
parable to a domestic animal and the 
principles governing its management 
should unquestionably be those employed 
by breeders of live stock. Rigid rules 
of procedure are as inadvisable in the 
case of the seals as they would be with 
horses or sheep. 

Conclusions. 

Conclusions regarding the effect of 
existing laws, especially the law of 1912, 
as seen in the light of conditions in 1914, 
may be summarized as follows : 

(1) The law effects a suspension of 
sealing for six years instead of five and 
sealing has now been restricted for 
three years. 

(2) The benefits of the law as a pro- 



50 



THE GAME BREEDER 




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tective measure have now been attained, 
the seal herd being past the danger 
point. 

(3) The law guards almost wholly 
against practices which may have been 
possible under the leasing system, but 
which can not occur under full Govern- 
ment management. 

(4) The law is a rigid measure im- 
posing fixed restrictions on the manage- 
ment of living animals subject to natural 
vicissitudes, whereas in the nature of 
the case reasonable elasticity is required 
to meet conditions as they arise. 

(5) Under the law, no one has discre- 
tion to permit the killing of seals in 
emergencies or exceptional circumstances 
to prevent the spread of disease, to 
avoid suffering, to provide material for 
scientific study, or to obtain specimens 
for museums and other educational in- 
stitutions. 

(6) By provision for the annual sale 
of skins, the law makes it difficult to 
regulate the time of the sale to market 
conditions. Moreover, a small output of 
skins during the suspension of commer- 
cial sealing may cause the demand for 
them to diminish, and a sudden large 
supply upon the resumption of sealing 
is likely to meet with reduced prices. 

(7) The blue fox industry, capable of 
yielding $50,000 or more per annum, is 
reduced to small proportions through 
lack of seal meat for food. 

(8) The continued suspension of seal- 



ing and the subsequent reserves pro- 
vided by law will create a large excess of 
males, and failure to take and market 
their skins at the proper time will cause 
an estimated minimum loss of $2,700,000. 
• (9) A part of this loss falls upon 
Great Britain and Japan, to each of 
which we are by treaty bound to deliver 
15 per cent, of the annual take under 
commercial sealing. 

(10) The suspension of sealing pre- 
vents the immediate determination of 
the proportion of seals which naturally 
survive the killable age, a most vexed 
and vital matter, which must be settled 
before any explicit regulations based on 
sound principles can be formulated. 

(11) The development of general 
efficiency for the future management of 
a very large and profitable business, the 
training of both white and native em- 
ployees, the installation of modern 
methods, and the numerous preparations 
necessary for adaptation to new condi- 
tions are largely dependent upon the re- 
sumption of active sealing at the earliest 
possible date. 

(12) The law now offers 'no compen- 
sations for its many disadvantages. It 
has served a purpose as a remedy for a 
shortage of male life, but though a 
shortage existed when the law was en- 
acted it does not now and will not in the 
future, whether the law be in effect or 
not. 



THE DEER TROUBLE. 

By Warren R. Leach 



With reference to your letter and en- 
closing one from Mr. John Reinhart on 
the disease which appeared among his 
deer, I will say that this disease has ap- 
peared at intervals among the various 
herds of deer and other ruminants all 
over the United States for the past 
twenty-five years. At the time I had 
my first experience with it among my 
milk cows and a local veterinary whose 
sole ability lay in practical experience 
alone stated that it seemed to be general 



in our county at that time. Cows en- 
tirely dried up in their milk in two days' 
time and after treatment they gradually 
came to it again in a week or ten days. 
On examination their mouths, gums and 
throats were found to be inflamed and in 
very sore and angry-looking condition. 
The animals could. not eat, though they 
tried to do so. I have never had this 
appear among my big game, but last 
year a gentleman in Alabama wrote me 
that his deer were affected in this same 



52 THE GAME BREEDER 

way, and the past spring a deer breeder do, and plenty of it. Scarcely a day 
in Missouri wrote me that his deer were goes by but that my animals go to the 
sick and that nearly all the deer and elk salt and put in a half hour there. Mr. 
in various preserves in the State were Reinhart makes a great mistake in feed- 
so affected and in some preserves it had ing his animals bran and stock condition 
nearly- wiped out the herds both deer powders. In a great many of these 
and elk. powders there is a goodly per cent, of 
A few years ago I shipped in to my black antimony, which is enough said, 
preserve a number of deer from Colo- While deer like bran or grain, if he will 
rado against the advice of a Pennsyl- feed nothing but clover or alfalfa hay 
vania deer breeder -who said that deer, his deer will do better than on grain, 
mule deer especially, would develop pul- People admire the sleek condition of all 
monary diseases in a lower altitude, and the deer family in Lincoln Park, Chi- 
he begged me not to put them in my cago; yet in a conversation last January 
herd. I did not heed his warning and with C. B. DeVry, the director, he said: 
shipped in seven mule deer as fat and "These animals have not had a mouthful 
slick as could be. In four months all of grain in five years — nothing but al- 
were dead and in addition I lost several falfa hay." Blue grass is all right for 
elk, Virginia deer and one Japanese sika Mr. Reinhart's buffaloes, also for white 
from the same symptoms, though the deer, Japanese sikas and elk, but his 
main body of my herd did not contract Virginia deer will well-nigh starve be- 
the disease. In these cases they lost flesh fore they will eat it. A fresh clover field, 
until they were nothing but skin and alfalfa, acorns or weeds will appeal much 
bones, and I do not think that medicine quicker. There would be great difficulty 
would have helped them. Several years in treating deer for sore mouth, as they 
ago I sold to the New York Zoo an would struggle and be very hard to 
antelope shipped in from the West. This handle. The remedy which our veteri- 
animal died in six months and the park nary used is as follows: One ounce of 
people wrote me that they had invariably powdered alum to one-fourth ounce of 
lost antelope sent in from a high altitude golden seal in a pint of rain water or 
and that they would never again try boiled water. Make a cloth swab and 
them. A gentleman in Indiana had mule swab the mouth and affected parts freely, 
deer which he thought were thoroughly In two or three days the animal will 
acclimated, but soon after the publishing begin to eat and recover. My own opin- 
of an article stating that he had them ion is that this is a stomach disease and 
breeding all right and doing well in the results in sore mouth, the same way that 
denser atmosphere the disease swept his i n human beings there is a resultant bad 
herd clean, so I was informed by a gen- taste i n the mouth and "fever blisters" 
tleman who claimed to be a resident of when one has a disordered stomach, and 

the town. even death results when the stomach dis- 

Now in Mr Reinhart s herd trouble order becQmes acute In conclusion j 

he purchased his buffaloes of me, but •„ -i_ . • , ■ r » 

not his deer, and I do not know where ™ U ^ that in a very recent issue of a 

they came from. Possibly I would have W f^ , V »-ginia paper there is an article 

known the herd, but as he says they were published which bears out my theory, and 

fat when received I am inclined to think : enclose the clipping. It is clipped from 

they merely have the sore mouth and not The Pocahontas Times of September 23. 

pulmonary trouble. He asks if his buf- I trust that you may find something in 

faloes require salt. Most assuredly they the above to benefit your inquirers. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



53 




Woodmont Club from the Potomac. 



THE WOODMONT ROD AND GUN CLUB. 

By Henry P. Bridges. 




are sure to get wild 
turkeys if you shoot 
at the Woodmont. 
The Woodmont is 
probably one of the 
oldest game clubs in 
America. It has been 
in existence for over 
fifty years and has 
entertained from time 
to time many distin- 
guished sportsmen, among them gen- 
erals and admirals and no fewer than 
four Presidents of the United States — 
Presidents Garfield, Arthur, Cleveland 
and Harrison. Robert L. Hill has been 
a guide at the club for fifty years and 
took Mr. Eugene du Pont, Dr. Sexton 
and the writer out last fall when we se- 
cured the game shown in the illustrations 
in one day's shooting. Mr. Hill is a fine 
and entertaining old character and he has 
had the honor of protecting all of the 
Presidents who have visited the club and 
many other distinguished men. 



The club has about six thousand acres 
on the Potomac river, in Washington 
County, Maryland, and a fine club-house 
containing twenty-four rooms. The 
club's specialty is wild turkeys, which are 
abundant. Without doubt it is the best 
place in America to shoot these splendid 
game birds. This year we will have 
about six hundred and next year many 
more or possibly fewer, the number de- 
pending upon the character of the breed- 
ing season. The birds bred in the woods 
are for the guns and not for vermin. 
The last named is persistently shot, trap- 
ped and poisoned and for this reason the 
sportsmen have plenty of game which 
formerly was eaten by predacous ene- 
mies. They have enough to restock the 
fields and woods just as vermin did in 
the days of game abundance. 

Last year the members and guests 
killed over one hundred wild turkeys and 
we had left over nearly four hundred 
turkeys. The shooting for deer, turkeys 
and small game will be better this year 



54 



THE GAME BREEDER 




The Club House 

than ever before. The season opens No- three guests during the shooting season 

vember 10 and closes December 24. The and he can visit the club as often as he 

members are already booking their dates pleases. At each visit each gunner is 

to take their guests to the club for the permitted to shoot two wild turkeys, two 

fall shooting. Each member is allowed pheasants (ruffed grouse), one deer a 




Where Turkey and Other Games Are Discussed. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



55 




An Average Bag. 



A Good Guide. 



The Author 



season, 12 squirrels, 12 rabbits, fifteen 
quail and four English pheasants. 

There is no more beautiful place in 
America than that occupied by the 
Woodmont Rod and Gun Club. The 
house stands four hundred feet above 
the Potomac river and the sportsman 



standing on the porch can view the river 
breaking through the mountain, each side 
of which is twenty-five hundred feet 
high. The view extends up and down 
the river for four or five miles. Many 
of the members and guests who have 
traveled all over Europe and this coun- 




The Club Porch. 



56 



THE GAME BREEDER 



try have exclaimed as they viewed the 
charming landscape that it was superior 
to anything they had ever seen. 

Many prominent men, for the most 
part from Baltimore. and New York, are 
members of' the club, and many guests 
are entertained by them under our liberal 
rules. 

We have an excellent Superintendent 
and Manager, James Booth, who has 



been with the club for several successful 
years. He is a good manager. William 
Schmidt, who is from Germany, is one 
of the best game keepers we ever had. 
He has just reported that the woods are 
full of all species of game this season. 

You must come down and shoot wild 
turkeys with us this fall and you will 
see what a beautiful place we have. 



THE NATION AND CRIMINAL JOKES 

By the Editor 



There can be no objection to a na- 
tional law protecting migratory birds 
during the nesting season, excepting, pos- 
sibly, the difficulty in executing such a 
law, and provided, of course, it be con- 
stitutional. 

There are serious objections to the 
varied and fancfful regulations which 
have been made pursuant to the law re- 
cently enacted. 

It certainly should not be a crime to do 
a given thing on one side of a line in the 
middle of the country and not a crime 
to do the same thing on the other side of 
the line. We are opposed to crime zones. 
They are not necessary. Blackstone says 
criminal laws should be universal, uni- 
form and easily understood. 

If the reader will look at the map of 
the regulations made ufider the new Fed- 
eral laws he will observe that it is a 
crime to do certain things within the 
boundary line on three sides of Colorado 
and that the somewhat fanciful crimes 
do not occur or are replaced by others 
on the other side of a line drawn around 
three sides of the State named. Since 
State lines are invisible and can only be 
determined by a surveyor, it would seem 
wise, having Blackstone's statement in 
mind, to make the national crimes uni- 
form throughout the country. The fact 
that there are no birds in certain parts 
of the country at certain times should 
not interfere with the . making of a 
nation-wide rule of conduct protecting 
birds during the nesting season. 

We think it a mistake for the Govern- 
ment to delegate its crime-making power 



to any individual or individuals. A crim- 
inal law should be simple, easily under- 
stood, permanent and not subject to fre- 
quent changes to suit the whims of pros- 
pective criminals. It seems in this case 
that the power to make regulations (in 
effect to make many new crimes) has 
been delegated to a department, but in 
reality to an employee of the department 
who is said to be a doctor of medicine. ■ 
We think it unfortunate and unfair to 
impose upon a doctor, who undoubtedly 
is not familiar with legal principles, the 
duty of making new crimes after con- 
ferences with interested groups in vari- 
ous parts of the country. Crime is a 
serious matter and many small crimes 
should not be thus made. 

The fact that it is deemed necessary 
to make the rules of conduct only after 
"hearings" throughout the country surely 
should indicate that there will be new 
crimes made from time to time to suit 
various people, and that there can be no 
uniformity. It has been said that the 
regulations will be changed from time to 
time to suit the needs of various locali- 
ties. Criminal laws should not be sub- 
ject to repeated changes. 

We think it would be wise, if it is 
deemed necessary to have a criminal 
statute elaborated into many regulations, 
to have the crime-making power en- 
trusted to a law student who understands 
the necessity for making criminal enact- 
ments "uniform, universal and easily to 
be understood." The people are pre- 
sumed to know the law. We certainly 
should not make criminal statutes (as 






THE GAME BREEDER 57 

many States have) which even the best cians to execute these numerous criminal 
lawyers are presumed not to know, enactments or regulations. The States 
Many fanciful crimes, in which the ele- have ascertained that fanciful criminal 
ment of wrong-doing is absent, have been laws,- although enacted in vast numbers, 
created by State legislatures. A citizen have not saved much game. 
has been arrested and fined heavily be- There would seem to be no harm in 
cause he received a present of a grouse, having a national law, uniform and uni- 
legally taken in Scotland and sent by a versal, prohibiting in simple terms the 
friend. It is a crime to take a game bird killing of migratory birds during the 
on one side of a creek, although it is not a nesting season. It is quite another mat- 
crime to take it on the other side of the ter for a great nation to delegate the 
creek. It is a crime to take a trout in power to make many new crimes in vari- 
one end of a stream and not a crime to ous criminal zones, 
take it a few feet away, across an imag- . 
inary line, in the same stream. Such 

criminal enactments have been multiplied Regulations for the Issue of Permits 

by State legislatures, and they have a for Quail Imported Into the 

tendency to bring more important laws United States from North- 

into disrepute, since the laws are often eastern Mexico. 

violated with impunity. These laws re- ^rr .. XT , , 1fl1K 

quire an extraordinary and unusual Effective November 1, 1915. 

police force to execute them, which too Under authority of Section 1 of the 
often in some States has become a small act of Congress approved May 25, 1900 
political army, and in such cases worth- (31 Stat. 187), authorizing the Secretary 
less in so far as game saving is con- of Agriculture to adopt such measures 
cerned. At a State meeting of sports- as may be neccessary for the preserva- 
men in Maine recently one of the speak- tion, distribution, and introduction of 
ers said they were engaged in restoring game birds, and of Section 241 of the 
700 fanciful game laws, which only were act of Congress approved March 4, 1909 
repealed two years ago, and he feared (35 Stat. 1088), prohibiting the importa- 
that they would be made the "laughing tion into the United States of such birds 
stock" of the country. as the Secretary of Agriculture may de- 
We regret much to see the National clare to be injurious to the interests of 
Government setting out on such a course, agriculture or horticulture, and prohibit- 
It is not creditable to the Agricultural ing the importation of any foreign wild 
Department. The numerous regulations bird except under permit from the See- 
under the migratory bird act, which even retary of Agriculture, permits for the 
are said to make the dove a migratory importation of quail from northeastern 
bird in one part of the country and not a Mexico will be issued on and after No- 
migratory bird in another part of the vember 1, 1915, and until further notice, 
country, in order to please local interests, but in order to prevent the entry of quail 
are on a par with many of the State infected with the disease commonly 
criminal enactments, and we believe the known as 'quail disease' such permits 
time has come to invite the attention of will be issued, subject to inspection and 
law-makers and the people who are in- quarantine of the birds, under the fol- 
terested in the wild food animals to the lowing regulations. *. 
fact that the sample regulations already (Signed) D. F. Houston, 
made create many fanciful crimes on one October 16, 1915. Secretary. 
or the other side of imaginary lines ~ ,-, 
drawn through marshes and over hills, _ PoRTS 0F Entry ' 
that the tendency will be to increase the Regulation 1. With the approval of 
number of the criminal regulations in the Secretary of the Treasury the fol- 
order to please the people in various lowing named ports are hereby desig- 
localities; that it will be deemed neces- nated as inspection and quarantine sta- 
sary to have a standing army of politi- tions, and permits, for the entry of quail 



58 



THE GAME BREEDER 



from northeastern Mexico imported into 
the United States will be issued only for 
birds entered through said stations, 
namely, on the Rio Grande at Eagle 
Pass, Tex., and on the Atlantic seaboard 
at New York, N. Y. 

Inspection 

Regulation 2. All quail from north- 
eastern Mexico will be subject to exam- 
ination by an Inspector of the Bureau of 
Animal Industry. Birds entered at 
Eagle Pass, Tex., will be subject to in- 
spection and quarantine for a time suffi- 
cient to cover the period of incubation of 
quail disease, but not exceeding ten (10) 
days, counting from date of arrival at 
the quarantine station. Birds entered at 
New York which have been under obser- 
vation during the voyage for sufficient 
time to cover the period of incubation of 
the disease may be entered, in the dis- 
cretion of the inspector, without further 
delay, if found on inspection to be free 
from disease, but if any symptoms indi- 
cative of quail disease are present the 
entire consignment shall be quarantined 
for a period not less than ten (10) days, 
and held subject to special instructions 
from the department. 

Permits to be Endorsed. 

Regulation 3. Permits for the entry 
of quail from northeastern Mexico will 
be endorsed by an Inspector of the 
Bureau of Animal Industry "inspected 
and found free from quail disease" be- 
fore the quail are released from quaran- 
tine and before the permits are accepted 
by officers of the customs. 
Quarantine. 

Regulation 4. During the period of 
quarantine birds will be confined in suit- 
able enclosures and furnished with suffi- 
cient food, sand, gravel, and pure water. 
Birds must not be kept in shipping boxes 
and the enclosures in which they are con- 
fined must be kept in a sanitary condi- 
tion, and subject to the approval of the 
Inspector. Birds imported on different 
dates must not be confined together in 
the same enclosure. Importers will be 
required to provide suitable enclosures 
to be approved by the inspector, and to 
pay all necessary expenses of mainte- 
nance of the birds during quarantine. 



Dead Birds. 

Regulation 5. Bodies of birds which 
die during the period of quarantine or 
during the voyage to New York must 
not be destroyed until submitted to the 
inspector for preliminary examination 
and if necessary such specimens will be 
forwarded;to the department for further 
examination. 

Suspension of Permits. 
Regulation 6. In case of discovery of 
quail disease further entry of birds will 
be suspended and all outstanding permits 
immediately canceled. In order to avoid 
loss in such contingency importers are 
advised to ship not more than one thou- 
sand birds in any one consignment, to 
use only new crates or crates which have 
been thoroughly disinfected, and not to 
attempt to hold in quarantine more birds 
than can be properly, cared for. 



Dr. Charles Frederick Holder. 

The founder of the Tuna Club of 
Catalina Island, California, died at his 
home in Pasadena, October 10, 1915. 

Dr. Holder was born in Massachusetts 
and was a direct descendant of Christo- 
pher Holder, who established the first 
settlement of Quakers in America, 1656. 
He was a well-known author and wrote 
many books. Sportsmen and anglers are 
familiar with "Big Game Fishes of the 
United States," "The Log of a Sea 
Angler," "Big Game at Sea" and "Fish 
Stories," in which he collaborated with 
Dr. David Starr Jordan. Besides the 
books about fish and angling Dr. Holder 
wrote the "Life of Charles Darwin," 
"Along the Florida Reef," "Louis Agas- 
sis, His Life," and a number of others. 
He was a good sportsman and angler, 
and at an early date he endorsed the 
"more game" movement in a letter to 
the editor of The Game Breeder. He 
belonged to many clubs, the Valley Hunt 
and Twilight clubs of Pasadena, the 
Sunset Club of Los Angeles, and others, 
and had received the gold medal of the 
Academie de Sport of France. 



More game and fewer game laws. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



59 



NOTES FROM GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 



Tobacco Stems for Nests. 

Many squab breeders use tobacco 
stems for nesting material. Mr. Willis 
E. Nowell, in the Squab Magazine, says : 
"I use tobacco stems for nesting ma- 
terial and find that after the birds have 
once used the stems they lose their strong 
smell and are very little good as far as 
keeping lice away goes. So after the 
stems have been used once, I make a 
small pile of them and spray them with 
a good lice killer, and keep turning them 
over till they are wet all over, then dry. 
When dry they are as good as ever. 
They can be sprayed and used several 
times and still be the dread of lice." 

We have never seen tobacco stems 
used in the nests of game birds, but the 
foregoing would seem to be a useful hint 
for game breeders. We shall be glad to 
hear from any of our readers who have 
tried tobacco stems or who may try them 
next spring. Remember always that the 
notes of personal experiences are the 
most interesting and valuable material 
for a trade paper like The Game Breeder. 



Editor Game Breeder: 

In reply to yours of September 29th 
as to how I feed my deer, I beg to say 
that they are kept in an enclosure of 
about 2,500 acres, embracing forest, cul- 
tivated land, meadows, etc., and upon 
which the deer find all they want for 
their maintenance and a variety of food 
very near resembling what they naturally 
desire to feed on. In the winter time 
when the snow is very deep we put out 
hay and grain, sufficient to keep all the 
game in the enclosure in good condition. 

I have never noticed any disease 
among them ; they are very vigorous and 
strong, and those that I have shot, so far, 
were sound and in good condition. 

For the purpose of keeping the blood 
in good condition, every few years I 
manage to acquire some new bucks raised 
in some other State, which so far seems 
to have answered the purpose, and my 
preserve is about twenty years old. 

C. F. Dieterich. 

New York. 



Feeding Young Quail. 

By John C. Phillips. 

We feed our young quail : 

First Week — Custard and Spratt's 
pheasant meal. Boil the custard until it 
is thoroughly set; also steam the pheas- 
ant meal for half an hour. Chop the 
custard very fine and mix with the 
pheasant meal. Feed this mixture four 
times a day in very small amounts. 

Second Week — Hard boiled eggs and 
steamed pheasant meal. 

Third Week — Hard boiled eggs, 
pheasant meal and Sprat's chick grain. 
The pheasant meal and chick grain are 
mixed before steaming. The food is 
fed until the birds are ten weeks old. I 
then start hard food. Wheat, buckwheat, 
kaffir corn, fine cracked corn and Spratt's 
chick grain. We keep the quail in the 
small guards for a few days only, de- 
pending on the weather; then let bantam 
and quail out into a circular run sur- 
rounded by 18-inch cellar wire, the 
larger the better. After a week or ten 
days of this we take up the wire and 
give them free range. 

We shut the young birds in the coops 
as long as they come in of themselves, 
but do not bother with them after that. 
I think it is just as well not to leave the 
bantam with them too long as they keep 
too tame and are more liable to attacks 
from hawks and cats. 



Conservation and the Constitution. 

One of our readers asks if the circular 
opposing the 'proposed constitution for 
New York, issued by the N. Y. State 
League, is purely a matter of political 
"bunk." 

Since the convention which framed the 
constitution was Republican and the 
league, although non-partisan, is we be- 
lieve largely Republican, we should say 
the opposition is not political. We have 
always believed the league to be sincere 
in its efforts. It certainly is composed 
of good and sincere men and has good 
officers. It endorsed, if we remember 
rightly, the law permitting the sale of 
trout by breeders before it was enacted. 



60 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T*?f Game Breeder 



Published Monthly 



Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 



NEW YORK, NOVEMBER, 1915 



TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, $1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc., 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotto, Treasurer, 

J. C. Hcntington, Secretary. 

Telephone, Beekman 3685. 

The dean of sportsmen, Charles Hal- 
lock, called loudly for "a revolution of 
thought and a revival of common sense." 
The call was and still is timely. 



the Issue of Permits for Quail Imported 
into the United States from Northeast- 
ern Mexico provides : 

"Bodies of birds which die during the 
period of quarantine or during the voyage to- 
New York must not be destroyed until sub- 
mitted to the Inspector for preliminary ex- 
amination, and if necessary such specimens 
will be forwarded to the Department for 
further examination." 

No more certain way of spreading a 
disease can be devised than the saving 
of the bodies of diseased animals. The 
quicker they are destroyed by fire or 
buried the better, unless, of course, the 
specimens be preserved by skilled hands 
for scientific purposes. We regard it as 
a mistake for the Agricultural Depart- 
ment to say, "Birds which die must not 
be destroyed," etc. 



We are sending copies of "Game 
Farming for Profit and Pleasure" to 
readers of The Game Breeder, with the 
compliments of the Hercules Powder 
Company. The book is reviewed on an- 
other page by Mr. A. A. Hill. 



A GOOD DINNER. 

Our wild duck dinner, referred to on 
another page, promises to be the most 
remarkable dinner held in New York for 
many moons. Various kinds of game 
will be served and this would have been 
impossible before the enactment of the 
game breeders' law in New York. The 
dinner will illustrate one of the many 
benefits due to the "more game move- 
ment." 



A QUAIL NOTE. 

One of our readers who wishes to im- 
port quail from Mexico, referring to the 
regulations of the Biological Survey, 
says: 

"You can readily see that the regula- 
tions are arranged so as to make it almost 
impossible for a man to import quail 
without taking the risk of having a heavy 
loss and I believe it is arranged with the 
intention of discouraging importers from 
investing too much money and capturing 
many quail." 

We need the quail ; in our opinion the 
regulations are rotten. 



DEAD BIRDS. 

An under-keeper known to keep above- 
ground a bird which evidently died from 
disease would certainly be discharged 
promptly by a competent head-keeper. 

Regulation 5 of the Regulations for 



THE FUR SEAL FISHERIES. 

After long controversy, accompanied 
by much acrimonious debate, over the 
management of the government fur seal 
fisheries in Bering Sea, we have a report 
by the new "unprejudiced" commission 
sent to the Pribilof Islands to ascertain 
the facts. The agitation, started about 
three years ago in the House of Repre- 
sentatives, resulted in the prohibition of 
killing of male seals on the islands for a 
term of five years. The Bureau of Fish- 
eries, and its advisory board of natural- 
ists who had studied the seal herd on the 
Pribilof Islands were opposed to the law, 
believing that the practice of the gov- 
ernment in killing surplus males on land, 
had no effect on the breeding stock of 
seals. The annual loss of females 
through pelagic, or ocean sealing had 
been long decimating the herd, and in 
1911 the United States, Great Britain, 
Russia, and Japan prohibited by treaty 



THE GAME BREEDER 01 

all such sealing for the period of fifteen caused the death of "several times as 

years. many more." 

This treaty was what all practical stu- The records show that from 1880 to 

dents of the subject had been working 1911 approximately 900,000 skins were 

for ever since the wasteful practice be- marketed by pelagic sealers, while the 

gan. The ocean sealing industry was total waste from seals shot and lost can 

suicidal and came to its logical end — pro- never be known. Along with all these 

hibition by international treaty. ' was the starvation and loss of the pups 

The mere cessation of pelagic sealing, of all breeding females killed, 

with its great waste of female and The increase in the seal herd which is 

young was sure to be followed by a rapid reported, "was due wholly to the cessa- 

increase of the breeding stock. tion of pelagic sealing" through the 

This according to the report of the com- treaty of 1911. 
mission has naturally resulted, and an The report may be regarded as a vin- 
important increase of the herd has taken dication of the governments methods of 
place. They report the herd "in ex- dealing with the seal herd. Although it 
cellent physical condition," and present is n °t likely to be any very permanent 
statistics showing that we now have near- deterrent to those gentlemen in Con- 
ly 300,000 seals, 93,000 of which are gress who attack the administrative de- 
bearing females. partments from time to time for their 

The matter of surplus, males was con- own political purposes, the Pribilof Is- 

sidered in its various aspects. One male lands at Ieast appear to be entitled to a 

of this polygamous species is found to rest - 

be ample for forty females. The sur- The commission was an able one and 

plus is a natural one and after a certain {t has performed a great public service. 

percentage has been set aside for breed- * 

ing purposes, it is recommended that the FROM BAD TO WORSE. 

surplus be killed according to former The Biological Survey has issued the 

custom. It is strongly urged that the new regulations relating to the importa- 

law be repealed without delay. tion of quail from Mexico. 

The commission further sets forth Evidently the authorities have heeded 
that failure to take and market surplus our suggestion that there is "no honor in 
males on the islands will result in a discovering a disease when the discov- 
minimum loss to the government of erer knows he has caused it." Instead 
$2,700,000 by the time the period of of holding quail at the border (because 
protection expires. some one imagines they have a disease 
_ An important matter in this connec- which they are surely presumed not to 
tion is the saving of the herd of blue have as wild birds) until they acquire the 
foxes inhabiting the Pribilof Islands, disease due to confinement as was the 
The skins of these animals, are normally rule that season. The survey now re- 
worth $50,000 annually, but owing to the quires importers who do not own any 
lack of seal carcases for food, have at land at the border to establish bird yards 
present a value of only about $16,000. where the quail can be pastured for a 
With the resumption of killing of sur- time under the eye of a politician at the 
plus male seals, the fox herd can be expense of the importer. This is going 
saved from starvation and be restored to from bad to worse, 
its former importance. Even the immigration authorities do 

The commission states that it is im- not hold up healthy passengers coming 

possible to show that any land killing by from abroad in small quarters until they 

the government has been excessive. From acquire diseases. They do not require 

1890 to 1895 the total number of males them to be herded in parks because some 

killed on the islands was 80,000, while politician imagines they may have dis- 

during the same period pelagic sealers eases, 

took 295,000 seals, mostly females, and Bob white is a first-class game bird 



62 



THE GAME BREEDER 



and he should come in promptly like any 
other first-class passenger. The gray 
partridges of Europe are shipped by the 
thousand to English dealers, who hold 
them in mews for a few days before 
selling them. If political inspection is 
deemed to be necessary for quail which 
are presumed to be healthy it should be 
made after the birds arrive at the mews 
of the dealers. There is a chance of 
some birds becoming diseased during a 
long journey in small boxes. An inspec- 
tion at the border will not change such 
results. We think the quail regulations 
as nonsensical as many of the migratory 
bird regulations are, and neither are 
creditable to the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture. 



LET THE QUAIL COME IN. 

The time to prevent game birds or 
other animals coming into a country is 
when they have diseases or when there is 
reason to presume they have them. An 
industry should not be hampered and 
prevented because some one, with an evi- 
dent fondness for regulations, imagines 
wild animals have a disease. They are 
presumed to be healthy and almost cer- 
tainly are healthy. Few animals have 
better health than wild birds. We need 
stock birds badly in this country on ac- 
count of "fool game laws" in the various- 
States. Let the quail come in ! 



A Wild Duck Dinner. 

The Game Conservation Society will 
have a wild duck dinner during the lat- 
ter part of November or early in Decem- 
ber. Wild ducks will be discussed by 
able^ authorities. Dr. Job will exhibit 
moving .pictures of wild ducks. Mr. 
Clyde Terrell, a Wisconsin member of 
the Society, will discuss the planting and 
growth of wild duck foods. He is an 
. expert in this subject, and will visit many 
Eastern game farms and preserves dur- 
ing the week following the dinner. All 
readers of the magazine who wish to 
have invitations to this dinner will please 
write to The Game Breeder promptly. 
It is desired to have wild turkeys and 
other game served. The date will be an- 



nounced later. It will be made to suit 
some of the wild duck orators. Tickets, 

$5.00. 

-» ; 

Game Farming for Profit and Pleasure. 

A manual on the wild turkeys, grouse, 
quail or partridges, wild ducks, and 
the introduced pheasants and gray 
partridges ; with special reference to 
their food habits, control of natural 
enemies and the best methods of pre- 
serving and breeding; including, also, 
an appendix on powder, loads, etc. By 
the author of "Our Feathered Game." 
Fully illustrated with photographs and 
many original drawings, by Clement B. 
Davis. The Hercules Powder Co., 
Wilmington, Delaware. 
This is a most timely, well written and 
well illustrated book. The writer is an 
authority on practical game preservation 
which is now attracting much attention 
in the United States and Canada. 

The object of the book is well stated in 
the Foreword: "This little book is of- 
fered to the people of North America in 
the hope that it will hasten the day when 
our continent shall produce enough game 
to supply abundant food, and health- 
giving recreation. The author predicts 
that America will eventually be the 
greatest game producing country in the 
world, and we believe he points the 
logical way for the fulfillment of his 
prophecy, * * * "Our laws have 
said, 'You must not kill game,' instead 
of, 'You may raise game.' * * * "In 
promoting game breeding, the Hercules 
Powder Company naturally considers its 
own interests, but fortunately they are 
inalienably linked with the country's 
welfare in this important matter." 

The book opens with an account of the 
former great abundance of game. North 
America, the author says, had a greater 
number and greater variety of wild food 
birds than any country in the world. The 
records cited seem almost incredible, but 
they are authoritative. There is a chapter 
on the many natural enemies of the 
game and how they should be controlled 
to provide good shooting. This is fol- 
lowed by a chapter on wild turkey breed- 
ing with references to places where the 



THE GAME BREEDER 



63 




Obeying the Game Laws. Rome, N. Y 



— From The World. 



birds are kept plentiful for sport and for 
profit. Other chapters deal with the 
grouse of the open country, the wood- 
land grouse, the quails or partridges and 
the introduced pheasants and wild fowl. 

The author points out how grouse and 
quail can be made and kept plentiful on 
places where their natural foods and 
covers are restored. He lists many of 
the foods; refers to the enemies of each 
species and tells how they should be con- 
trolled. The hand rearing of pheasants 
and jyild ducks is described in the chap- 
ters on these birds. The book ends with 
an appendix on the loads suggested for 
field shooting which adds much to the 
value and importance of the work. 

Although the book is evidently issued 
as an advertisement and is for free dis- 
tribution, it is a most valuable treatise on 
an important subject which now engages 
the attention of the sportsmen of North 
America. The Hercules Powder Com- 
pany has done a great public service in 
publishing this manual. The numerous 
illustrations add much to the value of the 
work. 

A. A. Hill. 

* 

"More game laws" too often means 
"more nonsense." 



When the Minister Comes to Dine. 

The New York Herald says the poul- 
try of New York, the regular cluckers 
and strutters, are to be bigger and better 
from every standpoint if the State Col- 
lege at Cornell has its determined way. 
A breed testing station has been installed 
there and New York is to see some 
chickens it will not soon forget. 

Many will recall the case of Toby 
Shay's hen. It was he who explained : 

"I had a pretty little hen, 
The minister he ate her; 
She left no weeping parents, for 
They were an incubator." 

Since tons of game birds, including 
wild turkeys and the smaller toothsome 
pheasants, wild ducks, quail, grouse and 
other game are now produced in New 
York, we feel sure the game birds soon 
will give the "regular cluckers and strut- 
ters" a run for their money "when the 
minister comes to dine." 



Crime is a serious matter. It seems 
too bad to have hundreds of alleged new 
game law crimes made every year when 
in most cases the element of wrong-doing 
is absent. 




Robert T. Morris, M D., Author of Microbes and Men. 

— Portrait from "Guide to Nature. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



(55 



Book Reviews. 

Microbes and Men. By Robert T. 

Morris, M.D. Doubleday, Page & Co. 

Net $2.00. 

It is difficult in a few paragraphs to 
review such a good book as Dr. Morris 
has written. He tells us in his preface, 
"the structure of this book is of the 'Oh, 
that reminds me' sort and adapted to 
fragmentary reading. One may open the 
pages at almost any point and find some- 
thing to which he will object." The 
reader who opens the book at any page 
will surely find something well worth 
knowing. The author evidently is an 
authority on many subjects besides those 
connected with his profession. Those 
who begin anywhere surely will read 'on 
and be instructed and entertained. They 
will no doubt often return to the book 
for "fragmentary reading," and this is 
one of the tests of a work that is worth 
while. 

Dr. Morris believes in outdoor recrea- 
tions. He is a good sportsman and 
angler, but recently he has given more 
time to growing nuts and flowers and to 
other rural pursuits than he has given to 
sport. At the top of his profession in 
New York and a very busy and success- 
ful man, one wonders how he has found 
time to acquire the varied knowledge he 
displays. He says it has been necessary 
to throw ideas together into a sort of 
loose general grouping because the only 
time for writing has been during summer 
vacation on the farm. The book should 
induce people to spend more time in the 
country. "Every family," he says, "can 
run just so far upon its stock of proto- 
plasm, as an engine runs a certain dis- 
tance with its stored energy in the form 
of coal. Those who load up energy for 
the family in the open air of the country 
carry the family much farther than the 
ones who load up in the city." 

The author discusses the origin of life 
in its various forms, genius, fact and 
fancy, culture, character, eugenics, litera- 
ture, mysticism, futurism, patriotism, 
scientific prophecy, marriage, and many 
other subjects besides microbes and men. 

One is tempted, after reading the book, 
to quote it extensively as the publishers 
have done. Opening it at random, we 



read: "When we have progressed in 
civilization to the point where we can 
take the next step, it will be an easy one, 
for we shall pray to Apollo for health 
more often than we shall pray to Dives 
for riches. When men set out upon an 
expedition for a chosen place in which 
the love psychosis is to begin, a highly 
cultivated man who knows that his fam- 
ily is runing out will then look for Maud 
Muller. Preserving her from care and 
sorrow, two people will be benefitted. 
The same old method in love, on the 
whole, but with a nobler purpose, under 
the banner of eugenics. A deeper love 
may be grounded in cosmic urge." "Car- 
lisle, criticizing Luther, said he had set 
at thinking people who. had no right to 
think. We shall have very much the 
same experience with propaganda of the 
idea that a man is only what his microbes 
allow him to be. Every physiologist in 
the world knows at this moment that it 
is true. He knows that he could not 
be alive excepting for the microbe and 
that the microbe will presumably cause 
his death." 

The book has been said to be a work 
for everyone who asks, "Where are we 
going?" The reader cannot but think 
often when he lays it aside that if "a 
man is only what his microbes make 
him," what a pity it is that there are not 
in the world more of the kind of mi- 
crobes of which the author is made. 



The Butterfly Guide, by Dr. W. J. 
Holland, Director of the Carnegie Mu- 
seum, and the author of "The Butter- 
fly Book," "The Moth Book," etc. 
Doubleday, Page & Co., $1.00. 
This little book is a manual for the 
identification of a commoner species of 
butterflies found in the United States 
and Canada and is issued in size and gen- 
eral makeup uniform with the very popu- 
lar Bird and Flower Guides by Chester 
A. Reed and the Tree Guide by Julia 
Ellen Rogers. 

Dr. Holland is one of the foremost 
authorities on butterflies in this country 
and in the present manual, 250 species 
and varieties are depicted in their nat- 
ural colors with complete descriptions 
of butterflies, eggs and caterpillars 



66 



THE GAME BREEDER 




Mallard Ducks and 
Mongolian Pheasants 

We offer for immediate delivery (limited number) of 

Mallard Ducks and Mongolian Pheasants 

and will take orders for eggs, delivery in the spring. 

ADDRESS 



129 Front Street, New York City, 

or JOHN POSTER, West Hartland, Connecticut 



Extra Fine 

MALLARDS 

Strong Fliers 

Raised on Niagara River, where 
they had unlimited chance to fly. 
Are exceptionally strong on the 
wing and splendid specimens for 
brood stock. We have pure Mon- 
golians, Ring Necks, Pit Games and 
English Setters. 

River Lawn Farm 

Grand Island Erie County 

New York 



NOW IS THE TIME 

If you expect to have fertile eggs next 
spring, buy your birds now ; don't wait until 
midwinter or next spring ; if so you will be 
disappointed. 

We Offer, Immediate Delivery. 

Silver, Golden, Blueneck, Lady Amherst, 
Reeves, Elliotts, Ringneck, Mongolian, 
Swinhoe, Versicolor, Impeyan, Manchurian 
Eared and Melanotus Pheasants. We are 
now booking orders for spring and summer 
delivery of any of above varieties as well. 
We also have for sale S. C. Buff and Blue 
Orpington and R. I. Red Japanese Silkies 
and Longtails. Wild turkeys. Gray, black 
mallard, pintail, redhead, gadwall and other 
varieties of ducks. Also Blue Peafowl and 
White Peafowl. 

WANTED 

White peahens. In Pheasants any of the 
Tragopans, Firebacks, Cheer, Soemmering, 
Elliott, White Crested Kalij, Peacock, Ander- 
son's Linneatus. Also Canvasback Ducks, 
Garganey and Ring Teal. In writing quote 
number, sex and lowest cash price. 

We will on receipt of 20 cents in stamps 
send colortype catalog of pheasants. 

CHILES & CO., Mt. Sterling, Ky. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



67 



Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Hungarian Partridges 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders 
for these birds and for years I have filled 
practically all of the large State orders for both 
Partridges and Pheasants. 




uv- 




Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck, Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners 



IB- ,1 m™ 




I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 best 
Royal Swans of Kngland. I have fine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES. PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have 60 acres 
of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER, LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — it will pay you to do no. Your visit solicited. 
I am only 60 miles from New York and 30 miles from Philadelphia. 



Department V. 



WM J. MACKENSEN 

YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 



In writing to advertisers pleese mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game. 



68 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Valuable Game Birds 


FOR SALE 


3 Pair Chinese Horned Geese 


1 Pair Blue Geese 


3 Pair Lesser Snow Geese 


1 Pair Eastern Canada Geese 


3 Pair Western Canada Geese 


1 Pair Barnacle Geese 


1 Pair Hutchin's Geese 


3 Pair Cackling Geese 


1 Pair Hawaiian Geese 


2 Pair Ross Snow Geese 


2 Pair White Fronted Geese 


1 Pair Anderson's Lineatus 


Pheasants 


1 Pair Australian Emus 


1 Pair Wanga-wanga Pigeons 


8 Pair Australian Green Wing 


Pigeons. 


ROBISON BROS. 


1260 Market St. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 




The Best in 
Pointers 

Puppies, Broken Dogs 

and Brood Bitches, by 

Champion Comanche 

Frank, Fishers Frank 

and Champion Nicholas 

R. 

Write me your wants, please. 

U. R. FISHEL 
Box 35 HOPE, IND. 



STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT, 

ETC., OF THE GAME BREEDER 

FOR OCTOBER 1st, 1915. 

Published Monthly, at 15fl Nassau Street, 

New York City. 

Required by the Act of August 24, 1912. 

Editor— D. W. Huntington, 150 Nassau St., New York City. 

Managing Editor— None. 

Business Managers — The Game"Conservation Society, Inc., 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary, 150 Nassau Street, New 

York City. 
Publishers— The Game Conservation Society, Inc., 150 

Nassau Street, New York City. 
Owners— The Game Conservation Society Incorporated, 150 

Nassau Street, New York. 
Stockholders- C B. Davis, P. O. Box 340, Grantwood, N. J.; 

B. R. Peixotto, 55 John John Street New York ; J. C. 

Huntington, 150 Nassau Street, New York ; A, A. Hill, 

71 Murray Street, New York ; D. W. Huntington, 150 

Nassau Street, New York. 
Known bondholders, mortgagees, and other security 
holders, holding 1 per cent, or more of total amount of 
bonds, mortgages, or other securities : No bondholders, 
mortgagees or other security holders. 

THE GAME CONSERVATION SOCIETY, INC., 
D\ W. Huntington, Editor. 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 19th day of 
October, 1915. (Signed) Geo. F. Bentley, 

[l. s.] Notary Public, No. 167, 

(My commission expires March 30th, 1916.) 




THE LURE OF WILD RICE 

bring Ducks hundreds of miles — my Wild Rice 
Seed for planting is the finest of the year— also 
Wild Celery, Wapato, and other natural foods 
that Ducks love. 

Terrell's Famous Wild Fowl 

Strong, healthy, fresh from their native haunts — 
for breeding or stocking purposes. I have the 
Wild Fowl that are considered best in the 
country. Mallards, Black Ducks, Canvasbacks, 
Wood Ducks, Pintails, Teal, Geese, Pheasants, 
etc., and Wild Mallard eggs in Spring from 
birds of strong flying strain. 

Write for My Free Instructive Booklet. 

CLYDE B. TERRELL 

Naturalist 
Department P OSHKOSH, WISCONSIN 



Game Birds 

I am offering for immediate delivery 
the following hand-reared birds. These 
birds are in every way extra choice, being 
thoroughly acclimated, requiring no 
housing in the winter and most desirable 
for breeding in the coming Spring. 

Genuine WILD Mallard ducks $5.00 per pair 

Decoy Mallards 3.00 " 

Wood duck 16.00 " " 

Mated Canadian geese 10.00 

Also Pintails, Black duck, Widgeon, 
Red-heads, Blue-bills, Green- and Blue- 
Winged Teal, etc., and several varieties 
of Wild Geese. 

RING NECK Pheasants $5.50 per pair 

Golden Pheasants 15.00 " " 

Also Silver, Amherst, Reeves Pheas- 
ants and Common Bantams for pheasant 
rearing. 

Safe Delivery Guaranteed. 

JOHN HEYWOOD 
Box B Gardner, Mass. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



69 



DALCARLIA GAME FARM 

Wild Turkeys, English Pheasants, Quail, Plymouth Rock, 
Rhode Island Red and Brown Leghorn Chickens, White 
African, Pearl and Lavender Guineas. 

Located at HANCOCK, MARYLAND 

Address all communications to 
HENRY P. BRIDGES, 1109 Calvert Building, BALTIMORE, MD. 

MADISON SQUARE GARDEN 

"America's Leading Poultry Show" 

27 th Annual Exhibition 

December 31st, 1915, to January 5th, 1916 °nTs™da^ a j S a n Da 2 y 

WHERE A WIN WINS MOST 

Entries close Dec. 15, 1915. 

For premium list and other particulars write 

CHARLES D. CLEVELAND, Secy.-Supt., Madison Square Garden, New York City 




Established 1 860 



Telephone 4569 Spring 



PRED SAUTER 

Leading Taxidermist of America 
42 Bleecker Street New York City 

Corner Lafayette Street Subway Station at the Door. 

Specialist in All Branches of Taxidermy 

Write for Illustrated Catalogue 



(BO 



GUN 
CLEANER 



[BO 



rests its claims not upon what we 
say of it but upon what users of 
LBO say of LBO. 

Mr. John S. Fanning, known wherever 
sporting firearms are used, says LBO is 
the best gun cleaner he has used. Mr. 
Fred Gilbert, the trap-shot, says that "LBO 
is good enough for him." Many less well- 
known gentlemen say practically the same 
thing. 

LBO Gun Cleaner is a lubricating 
nitro solvent and rust remover and 
it is a necessity in the work of 
cleaning guns and keeping them 
clean and useful. 

All Dealers or by mail, 25c. 
LBO COMPANY 

PORT RICHMOND NEW YORK CITY 



70 



THE GAME BREEDER 




Wild Water Fowl 

"Our Specialties." 

Wood Ducks, Mandarins, Wild Black 
Mallards for stocking game preserves. 
Safe delivery guaranteed. 500 Can- 
ada Wild Geese, $8.00 to $10.00 per 
pair. Australian, South American, 
Carolina Swans. 200 trained English 
Decoy Ducks, guaranteed Callers and 
Breeders, $5.00 per pair. Eggs, 15 for 
$2.00. Mallards and Canada Geese 
must be bought NOW to breed this 
Spring. For prices of other wild fowl 
apply to 

WHEALTON WILD WATER-FOWL FARMS 
Chincoteague Island, Virginia 



SOMETHING ISmSJV 





Defender Focltet Knife 

A Pocket Knife and Pistol Combined Which Fires 
a .22 Cartridge, Blank or Ball. No Recoil. 
Accurate and effective as any regular pistol, also a first- 
class pocket knife for both ladies and gentlemen. Not a 
toy. Handsome in appearance. Put up in buckskin case 
and packed in neat box, $3. Send Cash or Money Order. 

EASTERN TRADING CO., 1790 Broadway, New York 



Subscribe to The Game Breeder, $1.00. 



The Warren R. Leach Game Park 

DEER, BISON AND OTHER BIG GAME 
WILD GEESE AND WILD DUCKS 

WRITE FOR PRICE LISTS 



Warren R* Leach 



Rushville, Illinois 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



71 






*?/*■' 



F„mn«rous ™,™" *,& keeper,. 

f the Engli* "'" , e " in 5? 5 Lok onW 

f -1 c«pl»i" Mf,x *' 'wer to vermin nnd 

■Strum™ reata ?id, ,™ the »»»'» l « 

"iWn and the gu „ Fryer> 

Ktood the l f ' °' „ S ot vermin 
p.Mbustheeontro' tocV 

*%ld one that »! , . K ^ cphenW , i 
^.tehineume. "'I- e „ u 

ffif ■ S D,™fn he«« veS """ 
AVtors. Lfan "» . Rame 

pwgSS 



p« 



IfTcrorv' 
Mz roxc5 



^* 



^^^ 



Write For A 
Copy of This Book 



V^OU who are interested in game farming, either as a business or as a hobby, 
■*■ will find "Game Farming for Profit and Pleasure" a valuable addition 
to your library. The book contains a mine of intensely interesting and val- 
uable information on our feathered game. 

GAME FARMING 

for 

PROFIT and PLEASURE 



is a carefuly edited and profusely illustrated 
manual on game birds. It describes in detail 
the food, habits and enemies of wild turkeys, 
grouse, quail, wild ducks, pheasants, and re- 
lated species. 

It tells the best methods for breeding ; compares 
the results obtained by hand rearing and wild 
rearing; discusses the questions of marketing 
and hunting. 



Game Farming for Profit and Pleasure has been 
published with the hope that it will encourage 
the breeding of game birds and hasten the day 
when this country will produce sufficient game 
to supply abundant food and health-giving sport. ■ 

For the present single copies of the book will 
be sent free of charge to those who ask for 
them. Write for your copy today. Address: 



Game Breeding Department 

HERCULES POWDER CO. 

Wilmington, Del. 



72 



THE GAME BREEDER 




REMINGTON 
UMC 



US. PAT. 0^ 



Remjnpon 

Metallic Cartridges for All Makes 
of Rifles, Pistols and Revolvers, 
and for All Calibers. 



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!K 



IT'S a curious thing, the change that has 
come in sportsmen's habits of buying 
metallic cartridges. 

There was no need to be critical in the 
old days. Game was so plentiful one could 
always get a fair bag with almost any kind 
of ammunition. 

But as game became scarcer, sportsmen 
began to look more consciously for sure 
results in ammunition. 

The remarkable increase in the demand 
for Remington-UMC cartridges dates from 
that time. 

The increase is steady — every year more 
sportsmen asking for Remington-UMC — 
and more dealers specializing in Remington 
metallics. 

A specially satisfying feature of Reming- 
ton-UMC service is that Remington metal- 
lics are made for all calibers of rifles, pistols 
and revolvers. And the fact that in every 
community there is at least one dealer who 
makes a feature of Remington-UMC. 

The dealer who displays the Red Ball 
Mark of Remington-UMC — that's the 
sure sign of the right kind of a dealer. 
Go to him. 

Remington Arms -Union Metallic Cartridge Co. 
Woolworth Bldg. (233 Broadway) New York City 



t 



"\ 



REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 




Beautiful Farm 

Plainfield, Hampshire County, Mass. 

Suitable for Game Farm or 
Preserve — at Villa View, a noted 
Summer Resort for 30 years. 
Fifteen miles North of William s- 



>urg. 



t^* t^* t^* 



Trout Ponds and Trout Streams 

Orchards bearing a great variety 

of Fruits — Berries abundant 

«^* t^* i£r* 

Excellent Farm and Wood- 
lands, House, including Furni- 
ture, Barns, Ice Houses, Hen Houses, Carriage Houses. 

HORSES /. COWS 
SWINE IMPLEMENTS 

JAMES F. GURNEY, Owner 

Care GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, New York City 



The above is an old stamping ground of The Dean of American 
Sportsmen, Charles Hallock, who says it will make a most desirable 
shooting box for some reader of The Game Breeder.— Editor. 



V 



■J 



r ti 

Spratt's Patent Limited 

NEWARK, - NEW JERSEY 

RECEIVED THE 

Gold Medal and 
Highest Award 

FOR 

DOG POODS 

AT THE 

Panama - Pacific Exposition 



The best is the cheapest. Your dog 
will appreciate your discrimination. 



Write for prices and send 2c. stamp for " Dog Culture.'' " Poultry Culture" 
sent on receipt of 10c, " Pheasant Culture," 25c. 



SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED 

NEWARK, IN. J. 

SAN FRANCISCO ST. LOUIS CLEVELAND MONTREAL 



foiAn 1# 1921 




$iqo p er Year 



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r * u i T H Er 



QAn E DBE 



VOL. VIII. 



DECEMBER, 1915 




The- Object op this magazine is 
to Make- North Am erica the 5iggest 
Game Producing Country in the World 



CONTENTS 




Survey of the Field— The Rebus—State Wild Ducks— The 
Best Way — Advice to State Departments — Two Bangs, $2.00 — 
New Jersey Justice — A $100 Duck — Pheasants in Colorado — 
The End of Bull-hunting — New California Rabbit Law — The 
Hercules Powder Co. Booklet — The Wild Duck Dinner — Quail 
From Mexico — Handsome Hangers — Hungarians in Alberta. 

My Maryland Game Farm ... Henry P. Bridges 
The Prairie Grouse -■.-'-- D. W. Huntington 

Public Fishing vs. Private Hunting - Hon. F. M. Newbert 

Is the Dove a Game Bird? - Oregon Sportsman 

Game Enemies - By M. J. Newhouse and others 

The Reeves Pheasant - - Gamekeeper 

Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves By Our Readers 

Preserving Meat for Poultry — " Partridge" and Quail — A Small 
Shoot — Rabbits — A | Wild Duck Experiment — Artificial Duck 
Ponds and the Use of Dynamite 

Editorials — Odd Shots — Two Methods of Game Saving. 

Correspondence — Book Notes. 



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PUBLISHED BY 



THE* GAME: CONSERVATION SOCIETY. Inc. 

NEW YORK CITY U.S.A fS^av/j-/S 



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WIRE - COOPS - TRAPS 

Wire 

For Deer Parks, Rearing Fields and Kennels 

Coops and Hatching Boxes 

Traps 

For Ground and Winged Vermin 

Egg Turners, Egg Boxes for Shipping 

And all Appliances for Game Farms and Preserves 



I shall be pleased to correspond with game breeders 
who wish to purchase wire, coops, traps or any appli- 
ances for the game farm and preserve. 

Special advice given to all contemplating the game 
breeders' industry. 



F. T. OAKES 

Room 622 
150 Nassau Street New York, U. S. A. 



1 do not sell live deer and game birds 



game birds, or eggs 



THE GAME BREEDER 



73 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 2 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 



THE GAME 

150 Nassau Street 



BREEDER 

New York City 



LIVE GAME 



PHEASANT AND JAPANESE 
Eggs for sale; several varieties. 
E. Park Ave., Haddonfield, N. J. 



PHOENIX FOWL 
S V. REEVES. 114 



QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 

other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 

WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 

antry and Game Park. 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now — the surest way to start 
■breeding this species. We are the oldest and largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country. Black and White 
Swans. Wild Ducks, etc , for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island. Va. 

WILD TURKEYS— For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County, Pa. 

FOR SALE — Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (iot) 

FOR SALE — GINSENG AND GOLDEN SEAL 
plants and seed ; Amhersts, Goldens, Silvers, Ring- 
necks. HELEN BARTLETT, Cassopolis, Michigan. 

FOR SALE— LIGHT BRAHMAS; BLACK LANG- 
shans ; Cochin Bantams ; Rhode Island Reds ; Guineas ; 
Peacocks ; Shepherd pups, $3.00. JOHN TALBOT, South 
Bend, Indiana. 

PHEASANTS WANTED. ONLY RARE VARIETIES 

such as Tragopans, Manchurian, Firebacks, Impeyans, 

etc. Kindly quote price. A. J. MERLE, Alameda, Calif. 

WILD MALLARD DUCKS— DECOYS ; GOOD FLY- 
ing strain. 100 birds, $110.00 ; 12 birds, $15.00 ; (less, 
$1.8754 each\ no limit. Order now and from this adver- 
tisement. Send draft. Shipped Mondays. Eggs in sea- 
son, $10 00 hundred, March 1 to July 15. C. E. BREMAN 
CO., Danville, 111. 

WE HAVE A FINE LOT OF PINIONED PHEAS" 
ants for sale. Prices on application. THURSTON 
COUNTY GAME FARM, Olympia, Wash. H. W. 
Myers, Supt., R. F. D. No. 1. 

PHEASANTS — Having plenty of breeding stock, Golden, 
Silver and Kingneck Pheasants. I would take a position 
on a Private Estate or Club to raise game, commercial or 
otherwise. W. M., care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau 
Street, New York City. 

WANTED— FANCY AVIARY PHEASANTS, RING- 
necks, peacocks, partridges, quail, prairie chickens, 
wood and mandarin ducks. Quote prices. ROBERT 
HUTCHINSON, Littleton, Colo. 

SES'D TEN CENTS FOR INFORMATION AND 
Price Li't of the most profitable fur-bearing animal, — 
THE BLACK SIBERIAN HARE. SIBERIAN HARE 
COMPANY. Hamilton, Canada. 

PEA-FOWLS, $12 00 A PAIR ; WILD GEESE $10 00 A 
pair; Golden Pheasants $12 00 a pair; Silver Pheasants 
$12.00 a pair; English Pheasants $5. 50 a pair ; White Chinese 
Geese $8.00 a pair ; Mandarin Ducks. $14 00 a oair ; Jumbo 
Homers Si. 00 a pair; Jumbo Hen Pigeons $2 00 a pair; 
Jumbo Belgian Hares $3 00 a pair. We buy and sell every- 
thing. Circular free. DETROIT BIRD STORE, Detroit, 
Mich. 



WOOD DUCKS AND MALLARDS 
FOR SALE— Wood ducks and wild mallards for 
breeding stock ; fine decoys. GLENN CHAPMAN, 
Midway, Conn. 



DEER FOR SALE 
Seven Tame Northern Wisconsin Deer. Bucks and 
Does, $25.00 each. F. FERRON, 416 Wisconsin 
Avenue, Oak Park, Illinois. 



DOGS 



NORWEGIAN BEAR DOGS, IRISH WOLFHOUNDS, 
English bloodhounds, Russian wolfhounds, American fox- 
hounds, lion, cat, deer, wolf, coon and varmint dogs. All 
trained. Shipped on trial. Satisfacfion guaranteed or 
money refunded. Purchaser to decide. Fifty page highly 
illustrated catalogue, 5 c. stamp. ROOKWOOD KEN- 
NELS, Lexington, Kentucky. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 
offer for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer hounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, bear and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin 

ArREDALES — THE GREAT ALL 'ROUND DOG. 

Collies of the best possible blood, beautiful, intelligent ; 
have ouppies, grown dogs and brood matrons Send for 
large list. W. R. WATSON, Box 711, Oakland, Iowa. 

DOGS TRAINED AND BOARDED. BEST AR- 
ranged kennels in the South, located on 10,000 acres 
leased hunting grounds ; forced retrieving taught dogs of 
any age ; my methods never fail ; thirty years' experience. 
JESS M. WHAITE, Cyrene, Decatur Co., Ga. 

FOX, COON, SKUNK AND RABBIT HOUNDS 
broke to gun and held and guaranteed The kind that 
are bred and trained for hunting by experienced hunters. 
Fox, coon and rabbit hound pups from pedigreed stock, 
and extra fine ones, price 85.00 each. Stamp for photo. 
H. C. LYTLE. Fredericksburg, Ohio. 

CHESAPEAKE BAY DUCK RETRIEVERS. PEDI- 
greed and Registered — Best hunting stock in America. 
Bred and raised on the Chesapeake Bay Shot over almost 
every day of the shooting season. Dogs and puppies for 
sale JOHN SLOAN. Lee Hall. Virginia. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

WHITE'S PRESERVE— WILD CELERY AND ALL 
kinds of wild duck food, plants and seeds. Also enter- 
tain sportsmen. Waterlily, Currituck Sound, North Caro- 
lina. 

PHEASANTS FOR SALE— 50 PAIRS OF ENGLISH 
Pheasants for sale. $4.50 the pair ; $200 takes the 
bunch. C. T. KIMBALL. Beloit, Wisconsin. 

FOR SALE. 
1 pair of Wild Turkeys. 1 pair Snow Geese, 1 pair Blue 
Wing Teal, 1 pair Green Wing Teal, 1 Pintail drake, 
also Amherst, Golden, Ring-neck, Reeves, and Silver 
Pheasants. 

H. W. SCHULTZ, Middleton, Mich. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letter*: "Yours for Moie Ganc. M 



74 



THE GAME BREEDER 



5 VARIETIES OF PHEASANTS. Wild Mallards, 
Wild Geese and game. Fourteen varieties of stand- 
ard Poultry, including Turkeys. Also Elk. List free. 
G. H. HARRIS, Taylorville. 111. 

OUR WILD MALLARDS ARE BRED FROM STOCK 

owned by State of New York. Raised under natural 
surroundings. The best that money can buy. Write for 
prices. ROY E. McFEE, Canajoharie, New York 

FOR SALE—GROUSE. QUAIL AND PHEASANTS. 
Also mixed bantams for pheasant mothers. Nothing 
better for the purpose. 50 cents each. O. R. AUSTIN, 
Foster Center, R. I. 



GAME BIRDS WANTED 

I AM IN THE MARKET FOR CALIFORNIA MOUN- 
tain partridges and masked Bob-whites. F. A., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New York. 



PHEASANTS WANTED 
I am in the market for 100 Chinese or English ring- 
neck pheasant hens not less than 1 5 weeks old or 
over one year. No objections if pinioned. Two 
Reeves cocks, four hens; two Amherst cocks, four 
hens. State price and delivery. J. F. GAMMETER, 
Portage Heights Game Farm, Akron, Ohio. 



SWINHOES 
WANTED— Swinhoes. State price and number. R. A. 
CHILES & CO., Mt. Sterling, Ky. 



GAMEKEEPERS 

POSITION WANTED AS SUPERINTENDENT OF 
large estate or game preserve by a professional forester 
and gamekeeper. Very capable man with fish and game 
production of all kinds ; also breeding and training sport- 
ing dogs. Excellent trapper. Highly recommended. 
Address SUPERINTENDENT, care of the Game Breed- 
er, 150 Nassau Street, New York. 

GAMEKEEPER— LIFE EXPERIENCED REARING 
land and water fowl, training and handling high class 
shooting dogs, conditioning for shows. A-l rearing pup- 
pies, well up in veterinary, competent manager of club or 
private estate. Distance immaterial J. H. W., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 

GAMEKEEPER— WANTS SITUATION FOR NEXT 
season. Skilled in pheasant and duck rearing. Will be 
open for employment January 1st. Reason for changing 
position is desire to get a change of climate for family 
A. E. JAMES, care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., 
New York City. 

WANTED—A THOROUGHLY EXPERIENCED MAN 
to raise pheasants, who understands planting and pro- 
tecting quail. English or Scotch, married with small 
family. Location, Virginia.— T. D., care of The Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New York City. 

HEAD GAMEKEEPER, SCOTCH, WANTS SITUA- 
tion. Thoroughly experienced in rearing pheasants, 
wild ducks, turkeys and partridges; 26 years' experience. 
Can be highly recommended. R J. M., care of The Game 
Breeder. 150 Nassau Street, New York. 

GAMEKEEPER REQUIRES SITUATION, UNDER- 
stands all duties. Best references from Europe and 
this country. Address M. F., care of The Game Breeder, 
150 Nassau Street, New York. 



POSITION WANTED 
PHEASANTS— Having plenty of stock, would take 
position raising game for club or private estate. W.. 
care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New 
York, N. Y. 



EXPERIENCED UNDER KEEPER WANTED FOR 
Private Estate. Single man, age 20 to 24. Applv to 
T. B., care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New 
York City. 



WANTED— SITUATION 
As Superintendent or Manager on a game farm or 
preserve. Experienced in game and poultry breeding. 
Good reason for desiring change of location. Would 
take an interest in a game farm to breed game com- 
mercially. Address C. McM., office of The Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New York City. 



SITUATION WANTED 
Wanted situation as gamekeeper. Experienced in 
wild duck rearing and pheasants; the trapping of 
vermin, and dog breaking. Apply H. H., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



SUPERINTENDENT.- Wanted, by experienced man, 
25 years, first-class references from large estates and 
game farms where 3,000 pheasants have been penned and 
20,000 raised yearly. Understand the raising of all kinds 
of game and wild duck, management of incubators, testing 
of eggs, trapping of vermin, training and management of 
dogs and all duties making of rabbit warrens. W. B., 
care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St , N. Y. City. 



GAME BREEDING FARM WANTED 
Wanted to purchase or rent a small place in one 
of the Eastern States where game breeding is legal. 
A small farm with a pond and stream is desired. 
State price and location. M. A. C, care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



Robinson Crusoe's Island Outdone! 

ST VINCENT ISLAND, FLA., in the Gulf of 
Mexico, containing over 13,000 acres of pine for- 
est, fresh water lakes, grassy savannahs, wild boar, 
native Virginia and Osceola deer, also imported 
India deer, wild cattle, turkey, millions of ducks and 
all varieties of fish. The Island with bungalows, 
hunting lodges, yacht, boats and vehicles for sale 
to close an estate. Easily protected. Many thou- 
sand acres of forest pine trees. Booklet sent on 
request. For information inquire V. M. PIERCE, 
663 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 



WE HAVE FOR SALE, 250 PAIRS OF STRONG 
hardy Ring Neck Pheasants, and 150 pairs of Mallard 
Ducks. All ready and in good condition for immediate 
shooting. Address DR. C. S. FOSTER, Treasurer, Kil- 
larney Game Breeding Association, Diamond Bank 
Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 






THE AMATEUR TRAINER 

By Ed. F. Haberlein 

A practical trainer of over 30 years' experience, whose 
system is up to date and stands nneqnaled. 

New Edition Just Out. Illustrated. 
A plain, practical and concise, yet thorough guide 
in the art of training, handling and the correcting 
of faults of the bird do? subservient to the gun 
afield. Written especially for the novice, but 
equally valuable to the experienced handler. By 
following the instructions plainly given, every 
shooter possessed of a little common sense and 
patience can train his own dogs to perfection. 
Paper cover, $1.00; best full cloth binding and gold 
embossed, fl. 50. Address 

THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, N. Y. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game ' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



75 







FOR SALE— MOTTLED JAVAS, GOLDEN WYAN- 
DOTTS. Black Wyandotts, White Minorcas single 
comb, White Guineas, Rouen Ducks, White Indian 
Games, $2 00 to $3.00 per pair ; Egyptian Geese, full 
plumage. JOHN BIRD. Lockport, N. Y. 


OUR FEATHERED GAME 

A manual on American Game 
Birds with shooting illustrations in 
color, and bird portraits of all 
American Game Birds. 

By D. W. HUNTINGTON 

Editor of The Game Breeder 

PRICE $2.00 


RINGNECK PHEASANTS FOR SALE. ISAAC 
SPENCER, io Wayne Ave., Ipswich, Mass. 


FOR SALE— ONE PAIR OF DEER. Bred regularly. 
Also one extra buck. Will sell cheap or take pheasants, 
wild duck or pea fowl for part payment. OAK HILL 
FARM, Moline, 111. 




75 Wild Turkeys 

75 Wild Turkeys, part hens and 
part cocks. Extra fine strain of 
birds and in splendid condition. For 
inspection and information, address 

DUNCAN DUNN 

Superintendent State Game Farm 
FORKED RIVER, NEW JERSEY 


Our Big Game 

A manual on the big game of 
North America with pictures of all 
big game animals. 

By D. W. HUNTINGTON 

Editor of the Game Breeder 




Subscribe to "The Game Breeder/' 
$1.00 per Year. 



Heating and Cooking Stoves for 
Clubs and Cottages 



The Camp Cook Stove 

This is an ideal cook stove for the 
Mining, Lumber and Military 
Camps ; will work just as well in 
the open air as indoors. 

Construction Companies working 
large gangs of men will find this 
well suited to their requirements. 




IRONSIDES 



STOVES 



Radnor Ranges 
Home Victor Ranges 
Victor Cook Dobule Oven 

Ranges 
Hotel Ranges 
Royal Victor Ranges 
No. io Ironsides Cook 
Patrol Wood Stove 
No. 90 Ironsides 
Haddon Ranges 



A FEW OF THE LEADING 

Home Victor Hot Water Stoves 

Farmer Girl Cook 

New H. A. Elm Double Heaters 

Vulcan Double Heaters 

Tropic Sun Heating Stoves 

Haddon Hercules Heating Stoves Victor Cook Ranges 

Ormond Ranges Loyal Victor Ranges 

No. 15 Hot Blast Heating Stoves Victor Hotel Ranges 

Victor Gem Cook Elm Ranges 

Laundry Stoves Farmer Boy Cook Stoves 

Manufactured by — — 



Index Heating Stoves 
Solar Kent Heating 

Stoves 
Prompt Ranges 
Cozy Ranges 



FURNISHED 

Our Friend Cook Stoves 
Sentry Wood Stoves 
Home Victor Cellar Furnaces] 
Home Cellar Furnaces 
Victor Cellar Furnaces 
Victor Solar Cellar Furnaces 
Farmer's Furnaces and 

Cauldrons 



S. V. REEVES, 45 N. 2i\d St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



76 



THE GAME BREEDER 




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T he Game Breeder 

Published Monthly. Entered as second-class matter. July q, igis, at the Post Office, New York City, 

New York, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



VOLUME VIII 



DECEMBER, W5 
SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER 3 



The Rebus. 

J. T. McClellan, of Glendale, Cali- 
fornia, writes: "I find on page 189 
of The Game Breeder a Rebus. Here 
it is: 

M. G. AND F. G. L. 

"Is it Migratory Game and Federal 
Game Laws? Am I right? What's 
in it?" 

Most of our readers would guess the 
Rebus thus : 

m. g. and f. g. l. 

"more game and fewer game laws." 
This is the correct solution. 

[It is fair to say that Mr. McClellan only 
began reading The Game Breeder recently. — 
Editor.] 

State Wild Ducks. 

Some people and even some State 
game officers seem to think the State 
should not breed wild ducks because the 
birds are migratory and likely to fly out 
of the State. It was believed in England 
for a long time and until quite recently 
that wild ducks could not be bred suc- 
cessfully on preserves and game farms 
and that those who undertook such in- 
dustry would only provide sport for 
others, because the ducks would fly away. 
Game keepers who made the first experi- 
ments soon proved that wild ducks can 
be reared and that many of them can be 
shot before they migrate even from com- 
partively small places. Nearly every 
country place in England is now said to 
have wild ducks. Some are lost when 
the shooting takes place but many re- 
main and attract other ducks which can 
be shot to offset the loss. 

In a letter from the Chairman of the 
State Game Commission of Massachu- 
setts, we are told that some people even 



urged that hand reared ducks could not 
fly. "We have banded," Dr. Field says, 
"only a few of the birds which we liber- 
ated, and of three which were banded, 
No. 101 was shot in Wayland, about 
eighty miles from the point of liberation, 
and No. 118 was shot on Long Island, 
N. Y., according to a letter received 
from Chief Protector Legge, of the New 
York State Department; the third mal- 
lard, No. 103, which left east Sandwich 
about the same time, has not yet been 
heard from." 

This duck may winter in the South 
and return to East Sandwich. Some of 
our readers have reported that their 
ducks which went South during or after 
the shooting returned to breed on their 
old breeding grounds. 

The Best Way. 

The best way for a State Department 
to handle wild ducks or in fact any live 
game is to distribute it to game breeders 
who will agree to multiply the game and 
tq shoot it and to sell it so that the dear 
people, who are said to own the game, 
can have a substantial taste of their prop- 
erty. The U. S. Agricultural Depart- 
ment distributes seeds to those who will 
plant them and a State Department might 
well distribute ducks to those who will 
see that they breed abundantly, and eggs 
to those who will have them hatched. 

We heard some time ago that another 
State Department was so much afraid 
that its ducks would migrate that it sold 
them all to a club in another State, possi- 
bly with the idea that when they migrated 
they would come back so that the peo- 
ple could shoot them and thus perform 
a remarkable stunt somewhat on the or- 
der of those who would "eat their cake 
and have their' cake." 



78 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Advice to State Departments. 

Our advice to the State Departments 
is : "Go in for wild ducks heavy." They 
are easy to rear. Our advertisers can 
furnish tens of thousands of ducks and 
eggs. Don't stint the dear people in the 
matter of wild ducks. Start the State 
duck farm in the Northern part of the 
State. The sportsmen will then have 
several chances at the State ducks as 
they go South. We would suggest that 
the ducks be permitted to 'return quietly 
in the spring and that the shooting be 
ended not later than February 15. Feb- 
ruary 1 or January 15 would be even 
better. 

Distribute many ducks and eggs to 
the farmers who have ponds, with bul- 
letins telling them how to rear them. Let 
them bang away at the stock in the 
autumn and set it going so that outsiders 
can have a chance to shoot. Require 
them to market some of the toothsome 
food so that the dear people (in whom 
we take much interest) can have wild 
ducks to eat. They quickly will become 
friendly to sport and incidentally to the 
State Department, which should repre- 
sent "all the people all of the time." 

We predict that it will not be long 
before any State Department which does 
not keep the markets full of wild ducks 
at attractive prices will be bounced for 
incompetence. 

Two "Bangs"— $200. 

"Bang!" an English pheasant dropped 
and Dr. J. Cor win Mabey, of Montclair, 
N. J., dropped $100. 

"Bang!" Dr. Mabey's gun sounded 
again, another pheasant fell and the doc- 
tor was out another $100. 

Dr. Mabey and the Rev. Dr. Thomas 
Travis, pastor of the Watchung Avenue 
Congregational Church, Montclair, were 
snipe shooting near Hanover, N. J., yes- 
terday. The pheasants were flushed. 
Dr. Mabey brought down the brace in 
fine style. 

Soon after the doctor and clergyman 
encountered State Warden Young and a 
deputy who informed them the open sea- 
son for pheasants in Jersey is only be- 
tween November 10 and December 15 
inclusive. 




Going willingly before Justice of the 
Peace Ketchell at Hanover, Dr. Mabey 
assumed all responsibility and was fined 
$100 for each pheasant. Pheasants are 
expensive, but Dr. Mabey will appeal to 
the State Game and Fish Commission on 
the ground that the fine is excessive. — 
Evening World N. Y. 

New Jersey Justice. 

When you hunt 
snipes kill snipes, is 
advice of preacher 
and doctor of Mont- 
clair, who were fined 
$200 for killing two 
pheasants through 
mistake. — Evening 
World, N. Y. 

Lucky Escapes. 

All the little $100 annoyances they 
have in New Jersey for killing a rabbit, 
a pheasant, etc., are avoided by game 
breeders who now make their own bag 
limits and season limits and shoot hun- 
dreds of rabbits and pheasants, ducks, 
etc., in a day if they wish to do so. Game 
breeders do not require any attention 
from State game policemen. It is a great 
saving to the State that no officers are 
required to arrest and fine ministers and 
doctors and others, including rabbit 
shooting boys, who* shoot on the game 
farms and preserves in New Jersey. The 
police can give all of their time to public 
lands and waters. 

A $100 Duck. 

The honor of killing the first wood- 
duck in New Jersey for the last half cen- 
tury, the New York Tribune says, cost 
Harry Barber, of Paterson, $100. The 
court had trouble in deciding if the bird 
killed was a wood-duck and the case was 
adjourned to procure evidence. At the 
second hearing Inspector Miller, of the 
Museum of Natural History, brought 
two mounted ducks, a teal and a wood- 
duck, and the court decided a wood-duck 
had been killed and imposed a fine of 
$100. 

Wood-ducks should be abundant and 
cheap in the markets and soon they will 
be, no doubt. Many readers of The 






THE GAME BREEDER 



79 



Game Breeder now own hundreds of 
these birds, but it is evident that outside 
of the breeding farms there are more 
game laws in New Jersey than wood- 
ducks. 

Pheasants in Colorado. 

Mr. W. F. Kendrick of Denver, Colo- 
rado, who is well known throughout 
America, on account of his good work in 
introducing the pheasants in his State, 
says, in a letter to The Game Breeder: 
"One trouble in breeding Goldens, to 
give them considerable freedom, is the 
danger of destruction by cats. I fur- 
nished a friend some quail but they, also, 
soon became food for cats." Mr. Ken- 
drick had better success with the com- 
mon pheasants and stocked large areas 
with them. 

The End of "Bull-hunting." 

California Fish and Game, published 
quarterly by the State Fish and Game 
Commission, calls attention to the pass- 
ing of "bull-hunting" in California. "One 
of the most important bills passed," we 
are told, "was that which prohibits the 
use of 'any animal or imitation there- 
of for the purpose of approaching any 
wild bird, with a view to shooting it or 
killing it. Although such a law for sev- 
eral years has been in force with regard 
to ducks, yet the killing of geese in this 
manner has not been prohibited, and 
hence many market hunters have been 
able to escape conviction by claiming 
they were 'bull-hunting' for geese, when 
in reality they were hunting ducks." 

The "bull-hunter" usually used a steer 
as a blind, and concealed beside the ani- 
mal, he approached near enough often 
to make a good pot shot at the ducks and 
geese. 

New California Rabbit Law. 

The open season on cottontail and 
bush rabbits in California has been made 
the same as that for valley and desert 
quail. The law provides that rabbits 
may be killed at any time by the owner 
or tenant of premises and by those au- 
thorized in writing by the owner or ten- 
ant. This gives protection to the man 



who is suffering from the depredations 
of rabbits. It is no longer necessary for 
him to kill the animals, when destroying 
his crops, "law or no law," as they some- 
times say in the country. 

The Hercules Powder Co. Booklet. 

Letters coming to The Game Breeder 
from all parts of the country indicate 
that the booklet, "Game Breeding for 
Profit and Pleasure," has created much 
enthusiasm. One of our Minnesota read- 
ers says : "I procured 100 copies and 
quickly used them all. I have never 
seen anything like it since I have been 
running newspaper items. It has aroused 
a wonderful interest in game breeding 
and people all over our State are be- 
coming very much interested." 

Minnesota can be made a big game ' 
producing State. The shooting can be 
made good for everybody during six 
months of the year. Long open seasons 
and good big bags should be the rule for 
many "noisy refuges" and the seasons 
and bag limits should be enlarged out- 
side of the "refuges." Anyone can 
shoot quail on Long Island, N. Y., be- 
cause a few noisy refuges keep up the 
supply. The overflow is found to be 
far better than the overflow from any 
posted farm or quiet refuge ever was. 

We believe the booklet will be influen- 
tial in stopping the efforts to prohibit 
field sports and that field shooting will 
soon be as important in America as trap 
shooting is. 

The Wild Duck Dinner. 

The wild duck dinner and annual 
meeting of the Game Conservation So- 
ciety will be held in New York, Decem- 
ber 14. 

Wild turkeys and venison will be 
served in addition to the wild ducks. 

The result of the Game Census taken 
by The Game Breeder will be announced 
and the president of the society will say 
a few words about the rapid growth of 
the new industry. 

Professor T. Gilbert Pearson, secre- 
tary of the National Association of Au- 
dubon Societies, will speak on "The New 
Department of Applied Ornithology," 



80 



THE GAME BREEDER 



recently created to promote the breeding 
of the wild food birds. 

Moving pictures of wild ducks and 
other wild fowl by Dr. Herbert K. Job, 
author of "Propagation of Wild Birds," 
will be exhibited. 

Mr. Clyde B. Terrell, of Wisconsin, 
will speak on "The Natural Foods of 
Wild Ducks and Their Planting." Mr. 
Terrell is an expert on this subject and 
will visit some of the Eastern clubs and 



preserves. 



Hon. J. W. Titcomb, State Game Com- 
missioner of Vermont, will speak on 
duck breeding in his State. 

Mr. E. A. Quarles, vice-president of 
the American Game Protective Associa- 
tion, will speak on the "New Depart- 
ment of Game Breeding" created by his 
association. 

The meeting will be informal, the ob- 
ject being to bring together those who 
are interested in game breeding for sport 
and for profit. 

Tickets for the dinner, $5.00. Read- 
ers of The Game Breeder can procure 
invitations by writing to the secretary of 
the society, J. C. Huntington, The Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau street, New York. 

Quail from Mexico. 

Our common potato, a plant native in 
the Andes from Chile to Columbia and 
as far north as New Mexico, though 
scarcely known until the 17th century, 
has become through the industry of pro- 
ducers a large part of the food of civil- 
ized man. Had the potatoes been held up 
everywhere for fear of some disease 
which no doubt many plants have, the 
potato would not have become an im- 
portant foods. 

Much is written nowadays about the 
high prices of meats. Quail can be made 
an abundant food just as the gray part- 
ridges have been made an abundant 
food in Great Britain and on the Conti- 
nent of Europe, where tons of partridges 
are taken annually. Many thousands 
are shipped as food to other countries. 
Restrictive laws have prohibited the pro- 
curing of quail, even for propagation, 
throughout the United States, and as 
Dr. Shufeldf, the naturalist, has well ob- 



served, we are "pro acting the game off 
the face of the earth." Stock birds in 
abundance are for sale in Mexico and 
every inducement should be extended to 
bring them into the United States for 

propagation. 

♦ 

Handsome Hangers. 

The Du Pont Powder Company has 
issued three beautiful hangers in color. 
One illustrates trap shooting, one repre^ 
sents snipe shooting, and the third is 
made up. of several pictures representing 
the various uses of Du Pont explosives 
for blasting and shooting. These pic- 
tures are all good and well worth hav- 
ing. 

It is gratifying to 1 have Senator Mc- 
Lean, author of the migratory bird law, 
write that he thinks well of The Game 
Breeder. An extract from his letter is 
printed on our correspondence page. 

We hope the Senator will agree with 
us that it is not desirable to have the 
migratory law elaborated so as to make 
a lot of foolish criminal rules, lacking 
in uniformity, which suggest the at- 
tempts of the State legislatures to save 
the game by making numerous "fool 
laws." 

Complaints still are coming to The 
Game Breeder about the "fool regula- 
tions," relating to the importation of 
quail, made by a regulation enthusiast 
of the U, S. Agricultural Department. 
Quail for propagation are much needed 
in the United States. The regulations 
are ridiculous. 



Hungarians in Alberta, Canada. 

About $1,500 or $2,000 worth of Hun- 
garian partridges were delivered in the 
Calgary district about four years ago 
and a smaller quantity to other districts. 

In the Calgary district these birds have 
become reasonably plentiful. I doubt the 
advisability of throwing the season open,. 
however, but trust that the matter can be 
handled so as to prevent an undue 
slaughter of these useful little birds. 

Ben. J. Lawton, 
Chief Game Guardian. 

Edmonton, Alberta. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



81 



MY MARYLAND GAME FARM. 

By Henry P. Bridges. 



I am sending you a picture of my game 
farm, showing a flock of my wild 
turkeys. The following is a description 
of the place : It contains sixty acres en- 
closed with a nine-foot fence of page 
wire. About one-third is in timber. It 
is a splendid location about two miles 
from Hancock in Washington County, 
Maryland. I have a 300 foot building 
for my wild turkeys and a fifty-foot 
building with four acres enclosed with 
fence wire, including the top, for Eng- 
lish pheasants and quail. I have been 
very successful in raising game and I am 
enlarging my quail output so that an- 
other year I will be able to furnish a 
number of quail. This year I can fur- 
nish about 100 wild turkeys for sale. I 
have an expert game keeper, George R. 
Morris, who understands the raising of 



all kinds of game and who has been very 
successful. We breed the quail under 
buff bantam chickens and also the pheas- 
ants. This is the most successful way 
to raise English pheasants and quail. 
Some of the wild turkeys are very hard, 
to get in the five-acre lot when we bring 
them in in the evening, as they are so 
wild they will run back to the woods. 
We have the genuine wild Pennsylvania 
and West Virginia mountain turkeys, 
and the people to whom I sold them last 
year stated that they were the finest wild 
turkeys they have ever received and 
their plumage was perfect and they were 
perfect, genuine wild turkeys. I sold 
Mr. William Rockefeller some of them 
for the Jekyl Island Club, in Georgia, 
and he wrote me that he was very much 
pleased with them. 



THE PRAIRIE GROUSE. 
SIXTH PAPER. 

By Dwight W. Huntington 



The prairie grouse eats many insects. 
Grasshoppers head the list, and Dr. S. 
D. Judd, in the bulletin to which I have 
referred, says, the insect food included 
12.78 per cent, of grasshoppers, 0.48 per 
cent, of beetles, 0.39 per cent, of bugs, 
0.12 per cent, of ants and other Hymen- 
optera, 0.39 per cent, of other insects 
and 0.05 per cent, of spiders. 

The ruffed grouse, he says, takes 
about one-sixth less and the bobwhite 
about one-third more of insects than the 
prairie hen. Although the bobwhite de- 
stroys injurious grasshoppers, the rela- 
tive proportions of grasshoppers and 
beetles consumed by it and by the prairie 
hen are notably different. In the food 
of the bobwhite the grasshoppers are to 
the beetles as 3.71 to 6.92; with the 
prairie hen the ratio stands as 12.78 to 
0.48. Indeed, grasshoppers constitute the 
bulk of the prairie hen's animal diet, the 
reason being probably that on the 



prairies the grasshoppers vastly outnum- 
ber all other sizable insects. For a 
gallinacious bird the prairie hen is highly 
insectivorous from May to October, in- 
clusive, insects constituting one-third of 
the fare of the specimens shot during 
this period. The species is particularly 
valuable as an enemy of the Rocky 
Mountain locust. During an invasion of 
this pest in Nebraska, 16 out of 20 
grouse killed by Professor Aughey from 
May to October, inclusive, had eaten 866 
locusts— a creditable performance, eco- 
nomically rated. Some ornithologists be- 
lieve that the diminution in the number 
of prairie hens is in a measure respon- 
sible for the ravages of certain insects. 
Farmers who know these facts must re- 
gret the extinction of the bird in States 
where it once thrived and they may well 
support measures for^re-introducing and 
protecting it. 

Almost every kind of grasshopper and 



82 



THE GAME BREEDER 



locust appears acceptable to the prairie 
hen. Among the beetles listed by Dr. 
Judd, are the harmful leaf beetles and 
the potato beetle, in both adult and larvae 
stages, and the injurious 12-spotted cu- 
cumber beetle. 

On most farms there is an abundance 
of insects; in fact, they are far too nu- 
merous, but it is important for the 
sportsman and game preserver to know 
that too many grouse or other game 
birds will result in too great a destruc- 
tion of the insect food which is all im- 
portant to the existence of the game. 
When the pheasants and other game 
birds have been made very abundant in 
England it has been found necessary to 
provide insect food for the young birds 
and insect foods are sold by dealers to 
the gamekeepers. In his excellent bulle- 



tin on the hawks and owls issued by the 
U. S. Agricultural Department Dr. 
Fisher states that hawks destroy many 
grasshoppers. The game preserver need 
not preserve the hawks for this service 
since his game will attend to the control 
of the grasshoppers and the real danger 
is that it will control them too closely. 
I by no means, however, favor the in- 
discriminate destruction of all hawks. It 
is desirable to see some of these preda- 
cious birds about, but the more harmful 
species clearly should be controlled suffi- 
ciently to prevent their taking much 
game on places where game is preserved 
for sport or for profit. As a matter of 
fact it seems quite impossible to do more 
than destroy a part of the hawks which 
soon become abundant on places where 
game is preserved. 



PUBLIC FISHING VS. PRIVATE HUNTING. 

By F. M. Newbert,- President California Fish and Game Commission, 



The State Legislature, in 1911, enacted 
section 4085 y* of the Political Code, 
which grants to the county boards of 
supervisors the right to condemn a pub- 
lic highway for the purpose of fishing 
along the banks of any stream stocked 
by the State which does not run through 
cultivated land. Prior to the passage of 
this act there was much determined op- 
position offered to the bill by certain 
people who held that such a law would 
have the effect of breaking down the 
powerful trespass law in force in the 
State. It was also argued that the bill 
meant confiscation of property rights 
and was in direct conflict with the con- 
stitution. However, the bill was passed 
and signed by the governor. 

In this act there is no confiscation of 
property without just remuneration. 
The county must purchase such a right 
of way after due process of condemna- 
tion. Further, the people of this State 
have been taxed from 1871 to 1909 for 
the upkeep of the hatcheries and for the 
importation and distribution of valuable 
food fishes. It is estimated, on reliable 
authority, that fully 95 per cent, of the 



fish now in our streams are the result of 
the work of the Fish Commission in 
the importation, artificial propagation, 
and distribution ,of fish. Since the peo- 
ple have had to pay for the hatching and 
distribution of practically all the fish in 
the streams, it certainly follows that they 
should have the sole and exclusive right 
to partake of them, subject to such rules 
and regulations as they themselves enact 
into laws through the medium of their 
representatives. Inasmuch as they have 
signified their intention to protect prop- 
erty from wanton destruction and to 
give just remuneration to those whose 
real estate is needed in the further ad- 
vance of community interests, it also 
follows that they may call upon any per- 
son to allow free access of the public to 
the fishing streams they have stocked, 
and to remunerate him for the loss of 
the needed part of his estate. 

This is certainly just and equitable 
when the required strip lies wholly upon 
wild lands not in any manner devoted to 
agricultural pursuits. In the peaceful 
entering upon wild lands for the purpose 
of fishing, the disciple of Isaac Walton 



THE GAME BREEDER 



83 



carries no more dangerous weapons than 
his rod, line and hooks. The danger of 
maiming or otherwise injuring stock is 
reduced to a minimum, and the loss to 
the individual through the forfeit of his 
sole and exclusive right to fish in that 
stream is nil. 

On the other hand, we have the time- 
worn and vexing question of private 
game preserves or hunting grounds. 
The erroneous idea prevailing among 
some people regarding these institutions 
is founded upon a lack of information 
concerning them. The people at large 
have not taken the time to correctly in- 
form themselves upon this subject. It 
is claimed that private hunting grounds 
may be done away with and the self-same 
argument used in the matter of public 
fishing is advanced against them. But 
the positions of the two questions are 
not analogous in any particular. Can we 
exercise the right of eminent domain 
against the private hunting ground, or 
can we condemn it in the interests of 
the great mass of hunters, and yet be just 
and equitable to the owner of the land? 
We must take into consideration the 
natural elements entering into the ques- 
tion, and, in so doing, we would com- 
mence with the most prominent bone of 
contention, the "duck club." 

The greater portion of duck club 
grounds furnish the best stock pastures 
in the State. On the duck-shooting 
grounds of the Sacramento and San Joa- 
quin valleys you will find more grazing 
stock to the acre than anywhere in the 
uplands. While this territory is covered 
with water the year round it is not 
flooded merely to make it a rendezvous 
for the waterfowl. Nature herself is re- 
sponsible for these immense areas of 
water. The water is from six inches to 
two feet in depth over the whole area 
and you will see stock feeding upon the 
succulent aquatic grasses and plants that 
spread their heads above the surface. 
The whole area is enclosed in a stock- 
tight, barbed wire fence to keep the pas- 
tured stock from wandering. But when 
the annual floods come, pasturing is at 
an end and the duck club becomes a thing 
of the past. 

Now the owner of valuable lowland 



grazing areas must certainly have the 
right to utilize those lands for whatever 
purpose he desires as long as he does not 
infringe upon the rights of adjoining 
property owners. If he wishes to pro- 
hibit hunting altogether he may post his 
land according to law, as does the up- 
land owner. The latter certainly does 
not care to allow indiscriminate hunting 
by irresponsible hunters and suffer the 
possible chance of injury to his grazing 
stock. This upland owner is very de- 
sirous of maintaining the law that en- 
ables him to keep hunters off his land, 
yet he raises his voice in anathemas 
against the "duck clubs." His execra- 
tions are born of thoughtlessness. If a 
law is good for the upland farmer, why 
is it not good for the lowlander? If this 
lowland farmer wishes to rent the hunt- 
ing privileges of his land and to so safe- 
guard his interests that he can hold his 
lessees responsible for all damage done 
by them, is it possible to prevent him 
from so doing? 

This lowland farmer leases to a club 
the sole and exclusive right for them to 
enter upon his premises for the purpose 
of hunting. There is written in that 
lease an iron-clad clause to the effect that 
the members of the club, jointly and sev- 
erally, are responsible for any damage 
accruing to either his real or personal 
property contained in the premises. 
Since this owner has granted to a few 
responsible people the all and exclusive 
right to hunt thereon, does it follow that 
he should extend that privilege to every 
applicant? If such were the law, how 
would the owner be remunerated for the 
loss of stock? Could ten days in the 
county jail for a stock-killer bring back 
to this outraged owner one thoroughbred 
animal ? 

Consider the position of the upland 
farmer without the protection of the 
trespass law. We will take, for exam- 
ple, a hunter who goes out to one of 
these upland ranches wherein stock is 
pastured. Within an hour he bags the 
limit of quail. He immediately returns 
to town and spreads the good news. Can 
you hazard a guess a.s to the number of 
nimrods present upon that ranch the 
next morning and can you estimate the 



84 



THE GAME BREEDER 



probable death rate among the cattle 
caused by those hunters who "thought 
the calf was a covey of quail just ris- 
ing?" If we take away the right of the 
upland farmer to post "No Hunting" 
signs and the protection of the trespass 
law, no rancher in any game country 
could keep even so much as a milch cow 
or a single horse in his pasture. But he 
enjoys the protection of the same law 
that prevents indiscriminate hunting 
upon the property of the lowland farmer. 
The erroneous idea of what duck clubs 
really are has made some people conjure 
up in their minds a veritable ogre. Peo- 
ple who have never thought of them save 
that "they were a curse to the country" 
believe they are vast stretches of water 
and tule of unknown depth with here 
and there a bleak little island for the 
hunters to stand upon. They can see, 
in their mind-picture, attendants busily 
strewing wheat, rice and other grain over 
the water to attract the water-fowl which 
fly over in a sun-obscuring cloud and 
alight upon the water. They also see the 
hunters shooting from early morn until 
late at night, day after day, while at- 
tendants feverishly reload the guns and 
bring refreshments to the busy shooters. 
It is a wonder that these people can call 
this sport, when such grilling work 
would call for the greatest hardihood and 
endurance. 



It is not generally known that practi- 
cally every duck club in this State has 
written in its by-laws a prohibition 
against shooting more than two days in 
any one week during the open season 
and none at all during the closed season. 
A violation of this clause or of the bag- 
limit law will cause a member's expul- 
sion from the club and the forfeit of 
his membership. The capital he has in- 
vested in his membership would, in many 
instances, cause a considerable personal 
financial flurry. 

Many duck clubs own their own 
grounds and they, in turn, lease the graz- 
ing privileges. Now could we, by any 
form of law, prohibit these men from 
owning that property? Could we force 
them to allow free access to their land 
to every man with a gun, simply because 
they themselves hunted there? Is it 
possible to confiscate that property sim- 
ply because it is hunted over about two 
months in the year and grazed the re- 
mainder? 

Suppose the State appropriated $500,- 
000 for the purchase of duck grounds. 
When this purchase was consummated 
who would enjoy this expenditure of the 
taxpayers' money? Answer: The re- 
tired capitalist and the market hunter. 
Stop and think it over. 



IS THE DOVE A GAME BIRD? 



As the interest increases in wild bird 
protection more attention has been given 
to the study of these creatures from an 
economic standpoint. In some localities 
in Oregon farmers are demanding the 
rigid protection of game birds like the 
bobwhite and other insect and weed-seed 
eating birds as an aid to larger and bet- 
ter crops. 

There is a growing sentiment through- 
out the United States for the removal of 
the dove from the list of game birds. 
Two reasons are advanced for this ac- 
tion; one is from a sentimental stand- 
point, the other from an economic point 
of view. 



In an editorial treating of the Value 
of Birds on the Farm the editor of For- 
est and Stream says : 

"One of the game birds, the mourning 
dove, is especially worthy of mention as 
a useful seed-eating bird. While the 
dove sometimes takes grain, most of this 
seems to be waste grain taken after har- 
vesting is over. These birds are most 
abundant, however, in waste lands where 
weeds abound, turkey mullein forming 
one of their favorite foods, while tumble 
weed and mustard are also eaten ex- 
tensively. 

"The immense numbers of weed seeds 
destroyed by these birds is shown in the 



THE GAME BREEDER 



85 



fact that the stomach of one dove con- 
tained 9,200 seeds of different weeds, 
while the stomachs of two other doves 
contained 6,400 and 7,500 respectively. 
If three doves at one meal can destroy 
23,100 weed seeds and thus prevent the 
spread of that many noxious weeds, how 
much good could be accomplished by the 
doves on one farm, in one county or 
throughout the State ? 

"In the United States alone the annual 
loss from weeds has been estimated at 
$400,000,000. In the face of these start- 
ling figures we can well realize the im- 
portance of protecting the useful seed- 
eating birds, one of nature's best means 
of checking just such losses." — The Ore- 
gon Sportsman. 

[The criterion of a game bird is that it be 
good to eat and a desirable object of pursuit. 



The dove is a swift flying difficult mark and 
it certainly is very good to eat. Audubon 
preferred it, we believe, to the quail. The 
doves undoubtedly will become tremend- 
ously abundant now that game farming and 
preserving is legal in America just as the 
wood-pigeons have become so abundant in 
England as to be regarded as a nuisance and! 
pest in many neighborhoods. Game keepers, 
and others are permitted to shoot them,, but 
they are not highly prized as game birds be- 
cause there are so many other birds which are- 
better both in the field and on the table. The 
doves soon became very abundant on the: 
preserve of the Game Breeders' Association- 
on Long Island. This was due to the quiet: 
and protection given to other game. The dove 
shooting was said to be very good in the- 
neighborhood by those who were unaware that 
it was illegal to shoot doves. They were not 
shot on the preserve but many might have 
been shot and eaten with no danger of the 
d ves becoming exterminated. We predict 
there soon will be more doves in America than 
the people will care to eat. — Editor.] 



GAME ENEMIES. 



The Crow. 



We invite the attention of the crow 
specialists of the U. S. Biological Sur- 
vey to the statement of Miss Mary C. 
Wilkie, in her article on Wild Turkey 
Breeding. "It has always been a ques- 
tion," she says, "whether the crows or I 
should find the nest first." Since Miss 
Wilkie declined an offer of $1. each for 
several hundred eggs which we sent her 
last season, thinking it more profitable 
to hatch them and sell her turkeys, the 
question she refers to evidently is a seri- 
ous one. 

Laws protecting "beneficial" crows, 
hawks and other vermin should provide 
that game breeders are excepted. Other- 
wise there will be a strong temptation 
to control the nest robbers and the de- 
stroyers of game birds, "law or no law," 
as they say on some game farms. 

Mr. Edw. A. Mcllhenny, in his book 
on The Wild Turkey, refers to the crow 
as an "ubiquitous thief and villain." 

Game and Foxes. 

Owen Jones, in his Gamekeepers Note- 
book, says: The keeper finds his game 
nests with his eyes, the fox with his 
nose. The keeper who must preserve 



game and preserves foxes takes steps to 
overcome the scent of his birds. He 
sprinkles the neighborhood of all the 
nests he can find with some strong- 
smelling fluid. But the foulest or strong- 
est scent will not save a bird when a fox 
has once seen her. Fortunately he is not 
clever enough to know a new trap from 
an old one, nor a sound from a broken 
one, and the keeper finds at nesting time 
a good use for his disused traps, placing 
them about birds sitting in dangerous 
spots. Any thing in the shape of scrap 
iron the fox suspects; anything unusual 
about a nest, such as a piece of news- 
paper on a bush nearby, will arouse his 
fears, and possibly save a bird's life. But 
as rooks learn to treat scarcecrows with 
contempt, so foxes learn to have no fear 
for harmless terrors, and the keeper 
rings the changes on all the fox-alarming 
devices which experience and ingenuity 
can suggest. 

Owls. 
Mr. Fred P. Oaks, 

Supply Dept, Game Breder. 

Your inquiry for the best trap and 
method of catching owls has been re- 
ferred to me to answer. 

I suppose it is the large hoot owl that 



86 



THE GAME BREEDER 



is so destructive at the dove cote or poul- 
try yard. The No. l l / 2 Jump Trap is 
very satisfactory and so easily concealed. 
The owl often leaves a dove or chicken 
half eaten and returns the next night to 
eat the balance, in which case the trap 
should be set using some of the unfin- 
ished meal as a covering for the trap. 
When unable to find the remains of a 
previous meal a good set is to take a long 
pole or stake and set it up in the corner 
of fence or near the poultry house in 
position to make an attractive place for 
the owl to alight, preferably slightly 
higher than poultry house, using a board 
5x6 inches nailed on the end of pole for 
platform to set on. The trap should be 
covered by feathers or a small bird or 
skin of bird. If an English sparrow is 
used for bait one on two of the very 
small feathers of a light colored chicken 
attract the attention of the owl. The 
board platform would be more satisfac- 
tory if old and dull in color. With very 
little cunning on the part of the trapper 
there should be no difficulty in being 
very successful in making a catch. 

M. J. Newhouse. 

Crows and Corn. 

You say that this year the crows have 
pulled your corn in spite of the tar. I 
had the same experience a number of 
years ago, and I finally became convinced 
that the tar was not of so much account 
as the substance that was used to dry 
it out. I now use air-slaked lime for a 
drier, and the crows never trouble the 
corn. Every year they pull a few sam- 
ple hills and then let it alone. If corn 
is soaked in water long enough so that 
the lime will stick, the lime alone is just 
as effectual without the tar, but if used 
in a planter it will rust the metal parts, 
which it probably will not do if the tar 
is used so as to stick it thoroughly to the 
corn. — S. S. Chandler in Rural New- 
Yorker. 

The best possible remedy for crows is 
to have some game on the farm and 
some one to look after the game. The 
crows will not get much corn or even 
many bird eggs when a keeper is on the 
ground to se'e that they do not steal 
game eggs. Since the game can be made 



very profitable in the many States which 
have enacted game breeders' laws the 
farmer should easily arrange to dispense 
with the labor of replanting tarred corn. 

There are hundreds of thousands of 
acres in the United States where the 
crow is now controlled by game keepers. 
We know many places where the farms 
have been made exempt from taxes as 
well as from crows by sportsmen who 
deal fairly with the land owners. 

At the preserve of the Game Breeders 
Association the crows traveling over soon 
learned that the land was dangerous and 
it was amusing to see them elevate their 
flight when they reached the preserve. 

A New Game-Saver Proposed. 
A correspondent of Outdoor Life sug- 
gests as a game saver a federal small- 
game license fee, "at say $5 ; a license 
fee for big game $10," good in any State 
in the Union. He would limit the game 
bag in any State to not more than fifteen 
birds per day. Five million guns taking 
15 each for a few days would probably 
take every feather on all of the farms 
not posted. Even two or three birds per 
diem is too many in States which have 
not enacted game breeders' laws and 
where there is no production. 



The Dog Question. 

Editor The Farmers' Review : 

I want to tell readers my experience 
with dogs and turkeys. A year ago I 
had 78 young turkeys hatched. When 
they were six weeks old I had not lost 
one. Then a neighbor's bird dog got 
among them and after twice attacking 
them I had eight turkeys left. I raised 
these eight and a few late ones, and I 
was not the only one that lost turkeys in 
this way. 

Bird dogs that are allowed to run at 
large destroy more quail, prairie chicken 
and turkey nests and young fowls than 
all the men and guns in a whole hunting 
season. If the farmer's wife cannot have 
her poultry protected as well as wild 
fowls it is about time something was 
done to make a law to that effect. 

Mrs. Minnie Shacklee. 

Jasper County, 111. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



87 



REEVES PHEASANT. 




Mr. Kendricks and Reeves Pheasant. 

This handsome bird, as shown in our 
illustration, was first imported into Eng- 
land about the year 1831 by Mr. Reeves, 
this being a male bird, and in 1838 a fe- 
male was brought over, but these birds 
did not breed, the male bird possibly 
being too old. However, some cross- 
breeds were reared. It is a native of 
China, and is called by the Chinese Chi- 
Chi. The plumage is shown in the il- 
lustration. The head is covered with a 
cowl of white, surrounded by a black 
band with a white spot under the eye; 
the neck has a broad ring of white ; the 
feathers of the back and upper part of 
the breast are of a brilliant golden color, 
margined with bands of black. Those of 
the lower part of the breast are white, 
each one having bands of black, rather 
irregular in their arrangement. The un- 
der-parts of the body are deep black, and 
the tail consists of eighteen feathers 



closely folded together. The length of 
the tail varies with the age of the bird, 
from 4 ft. 6 in. to 6 ft., at the broadest 
part only being two inches. The color of 
the tail feathers are greyish white, 
golden-red at the edges, and crossed with 
crescent-shaped bars of black, varying 
according to the length of the feather. 

These handsome birds are to be found 
on many of the large estates in Great 
Britain, but are not much of a success 
as a sporting bird,, except in a hilly coun- 
try where they come well over the guns. 
In flat coverts they seldom rise well, and 
are more likely to go back over the 
beaters' heads than face forward guns. 
One of the prettiest sights is to see a 
Reeves' cock well over the tops of some 
high trees turn to go back. In doing 
this he comes head downwards, with his 
immense tail spread out like a huge fan, 
showing all the underparts of body, tail, 
and wings. Then, when he has recovered 
his balance he darts off like a rocket, his 
long tail quivering like so many bobbins 
tied together at the end of a kite. 

They are very hardy, and rear their 
young exclusively in covert, and unless 
driven are very rarely seen outside. 
They are very pugnacious and most in- 
veterate strayers, and it is very little use 
trying to keep them on a small estate. 
At Elveden, in Suffolk, where there were 
a fair quantity, one frequently heard of 
cock birds being killed several miles 
away and it was only in certain coverts 
on that estate where they could be in- 
duced to stay. 

They cross fairly freely with the or- 
dinary P. Colchicus, P. Torquatus, or P. 
Principals, the first time the progeny 
being a bird of great beauty and from 
4^2 lbs. to 5 lbs. in weight when full 
grown. It is, however, difficult to get 
a second cross. The writer only obtained 
about a dozen birds out of some two hun- 
dred eggs as a second cross, and only two 
from the third. It will be seen from this 
that they are undesirable in our game 
coverts except for show. The writer 
once saw a half-bred bird shot, which on 
being picked up was' greatly admired by 



88 



Ti}E GAME BREEDER 



the party. After discussing the weight, found to contain only wireworms, the 

etc., a query was asked as to what its exact number being 397, not a particle of 

crop contained, which on being opened anything else being found. — Game- 

and laid on a sheet of notepaper was keepers' Gazette. 



NOTES FROM THE GAME PRESERVES. 

By Our Readers. 

Preserving Meat for Poultry. ber of wild partridges may be increased? 

Could you give me some information Could food be planted to advantage in or 

as how to cure wild meat, such as wood- near their haunts, or other methods 

chuck and rabbit for poultry for winter taken to increase their number, 

use? H. W. S. I- W. England. 

Mt. Jewett, Pa. New Jersey. 

Various plans are suggested for keep- [Mackensen, Yardley, Td., can furnish quail, 

ing this meat, such as smoking and dry- but has a waiting list no doubt. If the "wild 

• b i • j • • i_ i u partridge is the ruffed grouse, called part- 

ing, packing down m charcoal, or bury- g^, f n New England * many ' ioods cari be 

ing it in the ground. The most prac- planted to advantage— grapes, apples, various 

tical way, however, is to can the meat berries and mast, sumac, etc. Grapes, apples, 

about as recommended recently for wintergreen and mast make a fine combination. 

u„„,4i;*,~ \, a ~t ~.,,4.4.~ r , ~„A ^,-1, (n~ („ We regard The Game Breeder and its many 

handling beef, mutton and pork for fu- ke g epers and advisers as the best au- 

ture use. The meat is cut from the bone, thority.] 

packed solidly in jars or cans, and then 

thoroughly cooked for three or four A Small Shoot, 

hours and sealed. Put up in this way it Qne of our Massachusetts readers, in 

will keep for several months or until sending his repor t for the Game Census, 

winter, and can then be opened and fed . g the following interesting figures, 

to the stock as desired.— Rural New suggesting some g00 d sport on a small 

Yorker. shoot: 

«-,'.,„ , _ ., Pheasants raised 1915 : . . . . 91 

Partridge and Quail. Pheasants liberated 1915 91 

Regarding importing quail for propa- Pheasants shot so far about 40 

gation purposes in New Jersey, I have Living at liberty about 50 

been advised by the New Jersey State In breeding pen. 4 

Game Commission that they will not per- Since 1913 I have liberated about 210 

mit the importing of quail from Mexico, pheasants and have shot on my land 

due to the fact that they claim the birds about 135. 

are infected. This is far better than being arrested 

I was wondering whether I could not for having a stock bird "in possession" 

get a couple of dozen birds from some or for attempting to shoot or sell birds 

breeder in Long Island, or some of the reared at private expense. When we read 

other States, and bring them in for pro- of the absurd pheasant performances in 

pagation purposes. Kentucky and some other benighted re- 

I should be pleased to have you ad- gions we are more and more impressed 

vise me as to what you know about op- with the fact that it is quite worth while 

portunities for getting birds from this for a State to have intelligent game 

source, and I note with pleasure the in- officers such as they have in Massachu- 

formation concerning the breeding of setts, and it is gratifying to observe that 

birds for sale in Oklahoma and other Massachusetts elects capable governors 

States. who do not bounce good game officers. 

Are there any authorities on the pro- It is highly important that game officers 

pagation or methods whereby the num- should have long terms of office, and 



THE GAME BREEDER 



89» 




Young Wild Ducks and Hen Foster Mother. 



they should be well compensated when 
they make the game fields food-produc- 



ing fields. 



Rabbits. 



Many breeders of upland game birds 
purchase rabbits and introduce them on 
the game farms and preserves. Those 
who really like to shoot often have a lot 
of fun shooting the cottontails. Where 
the rabbits are abundant it certainly is 
quite worth while to keep a few beagles 
and to give a day or two to rabbit shoot- 
ing. The rabbits are desirable not only 
for the sport they afford ; they are also 
a great protection to the quail, grouse 
and other game birds, since the foxes 
and other vermin find the rabbits easier 
to take than game birds are, and the 
vermin, which will occur in spite of the 
efforts of the best game keepers, must 
have something to eat. 

Owen Jones, a talented English game 
keeper and author, says : "It would be 
a sorry prospect for keepers, game and 
foxes if rabbits were exterminated, for 



they are the buffers of peace in the com- 
munity of the woods." On another 
page the same writer says : "The rabbits 
are the foxes' bread and butter." 

Those who are starting game clubs- 
and preserves should purchase and in- 
troduce a lot of rabbits. They do not 
'cost much. They are easily turned down- 
and established. Our advertisers can 
furnish them and the time to buy them; 
is Now. 



Circumstantial Evidence. 

"Please, ma'am, your dog has killed 
three of father's prize fowls," said the 
small boy. 

"Oh, I'm quite sure my Fido would 
never do such a thing," said the old lady. 

"But father saw one of the chickens 
in his mouth," said the boy. 

"Purely circumstantial evidence," she 
snapped, and the boy departed. 

Some time later he returned. 

"Please, ma'am, father sent me to tell 
you that circumstantial evidence might 
point to his having shot your dog, but he 



90 



THE GAME BREEDER 




Artificial Duck Pond, Hand made. 



reckons you'll find he died of lead 
poisoning." — Exchange. 



A Wild Duck Experiment. 

About the artificial pond shown in the 
illustration over 3,000 wild duck eggs 
were gathered one season. These eggs 
were laid by 170 stock birds owned by 
The Game Breeders' Association, then 
located on Long Island, N. Y. Several 
hundred eggs were sold at $25 per hun- 
dred. A few hundred ducks were sold 
at $3.25 per pair. The members of the 
association had some good shooting and 
bagged about half the ducks reared and 
some visiting ducks for good measure. 
From the eggs and a few live ducks sold 
hundreds of wild ducks have been reared 
in other States. Some of the breeders 
who procured stock birds and eggs from 
the association now sell both ducks and 
eggs, and the ratio of increase from the 
experiment will be geometrical. 

A sportsman whose shooting ground 
is many miles away from the duck pond 
shown in the illustration called at the 
office of The Game Breeder to say that 
he wished to express his thanks for 
some ducks which came his way, evi- 
dently from the breeding ground of the 
association, since he had never shot any 
mallards on his ground before the asso- 
ciation was formed. 

The breeding pond shown in the illus- 



tration was dug by hand, a narrow cir- 
cular ditch which the ducks soon en- 
larged. Some wild ducks hatched from 
the eggs laid beside this pond have since 
been introduced about another pond 
made by dynamite furnished by the 
Du Pont Powder Company. 

Some of the young ducks are shown 
in another illustration with their foster 
mother, a hen, which often followed the 
young ducks into the water, a most un- 
usual performance. This excellent photo- 
graph was made by Mr. Lane of The 
Remington U. M. C. Co. 



Artificial Duck Ponds and the Use of 
Dynamite. 

Some of the best breeding ponds for 
wild ducks are artificial. A pond easily 
can be made on wet ground where evi- 
dently there is water a short distance 
below the surface. Such a pond when 
made in a wet meadow near and in sight 
of the house has a great advantage, 
since the ducks can be observed at all 
times and they are safe from trespassers. 
The eggs are easily gathered and trans- 
ported to the hatching houses and coops. 
Later the birds can be turned down on 
the larger ponds where they will afford 
good shooting. 

Those who have tried the Du Pont 
dynamite in making their ponds report 
that the work is quickly and easily done 



THE GAME BREEDER 



91 




A Good Duck Pond, made by Du Pont Dynamite. 



and at small expense. The best form 
for the pond is a circular or oblong ditch, 
with an island in the center. This is 
attractive to the ducks and affords a 
safe resting and preening place. The 
ducks soon will enlarge the ditch, mak- 
ing it wider in places, and in a year or 
two the pond will be considerably en- 
larged. A fence of chicken wire about 
the yard or field ' surrounding the pond 
will keep out dogs and ground vermin, 
and bushes and brush should be placed 
at intervals to form nesting places. If 
there are some trees and shrubs within 
the inclosure these should be left for the 
all-important shade they afford. If there 
are no trees some artificial shade should 
be provided. Bushes and small trees can 
be cut and introduced, and these will 
afford sufficient shade; but if the pond 
is to be a permanent one it is advisable 
to plant trees and bushes in yards which 
have no shade. 

A pond which has a little stream flow- 
ing through it is far more desirable than 
ponds which have no flowing water. 
Natural foods of various kinds are 
brought to the ducks by the stream and 
the water in the pond is kept fresh. It 
is remarkable, however, that even a stag- 
nant pond can be used for several sea- 



sons apparently without fear of diseases. 
Such a pond, shown in the illustration, 
was used several years by The Game 
Breeders' Association, and the last year 
over 2,500 ducks were successfully 
reared from eggs gathered about the 
pond and there were no losses due to 
disease. I must say, however, that I 
had some fears about the result, and I 
would much prefer a pond with flowing 
water or two ponds to be used alternate 
years if the water be stagnant. 

A pond in a meadow where some of 
the natural foods- can be made to grow 
is most desirable, since ducks are big 
eaters and the corn bill is a big item 
when the ducks procure little or no nat- 
ural foods. One of our readers who 
planted wapato said the plants saved 
nearly his entire corn bill. 

The ducks which have natural foods 
are by far the best for the table. 



"Anyhow, there's one advantage in 
having a wooden leg," said the veteran. 

"What's that ?" asked his friend. 

"You can hold your socks up with 
thumbtacks." — Columbia Jester. 



More Game and Fewer Game Laws. 



92 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T*?f Game Breeder 

Published Monthly 
Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 

NEW YORK, DECEMBER, 1915 
TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy— $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, $1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc., 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W, Huntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotto, Treasurer, 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary. 

Telephone, Beekman 3685. 

One of our Connecticut readers, in 
sending his subscription for The Game 
Breeder, asks to have it sent also to an- 
other person named. He says : "I think 
it is a mighty good publication." 

Our readers often send us new names 
and it is gratifying to observe that if a 
reader misses receiving a number we are 
sure to hear from him promptly. The 
call for back numbers has entirely ex- 
hausted our supply of many of them and 
we especially regret not being able to 
supply complete files for scientific associ- 
ations and libraries. 



unusual double on rabbits when shooting; 
in northern Ohio. Not long afterward 
we read an authentic account of an Eng- 
lishman who made a double on rabbits, 
killing two with each barrel. Another 
English sportsman once kicked up and 
shot a rabbit at 25 yards. To his sur- 
prise he found he had killed a hare by 
the same shot, her "form" being in the 
line of fire. At Beverly a shooter fired 
at a hare and killed it, when a rabbit 
was seen to leap up a few yards further 
and to tumble over dead. There are 
two English records of an unseen rabbit 
being killed when a grouse was shot at. 
In one case, when the grouse was picked 
up "a rabbit was found kicking close 
by;" in the other case when the grouse 
was missed "a rabbit came rolling down 
the brae." 

Mr. Alfred Ware, while rabbit shoot- 
ing on his father's warren, fired at a 
rabbit crossing a bog. On going to pick 
it up he found he had also killed a jack 
snipe. So the story of shooting at a 
woodcock and killing a rabbit may be 
true. We would advise the standing 
committee on fakes and fakers to pro- 
ceed cautiously with its investigation. 



ODD SHOTS. 

Although the story (cited on another 
page) about the remarkable shot at a 
woodcock which resulted in the death 
of a rabbit was referred to the standing 
committe on nature fakes and fakers, we 
should remember that truth often is 
stranger than fiction. Mark Twain's 
story of the Allen revolver, which, when 
fired at the deuce of spades tacked on 
a tree, bagged a mule 40 yards to the 
right (we quote from memory), appears 
to be true since he says the owner of the 
mule persuaded the shooter to buy it. 

There are many odd shots mentioned 
in the English sporting books and maga- 
zines, probably because game is always 
plentiful enough for extraordinary shots 
as well as for the commonplace. 

We once made a good but somewhat 



TWO METHODS OF GAME 
SAVING. 

The official bulletin of the California 
Fish and Game Commission says : "In 
spite of more game laws, shorter seasons 
and smaller bag limits, practically every 
species has decreased in numbers in the 
last twenty years." This is quite true 
in every State in the Union in so far as 
the statement relates to the so-called 
"State" or wild game. 

Our census of game owned by breed- 
ers indicates that on hundreds of game 
farms and preserves the quail, pheasants, 
ducks, deer and other game have in- 
creased amazingly; that the game re- 
mains plentiful although thousands of 
deer and birds are shot every season; 
that the game farmers and preserve own- 
ers are beginning to market this desir- 
able food. 

Game is cheaper than poultry, often, 
in foreign markets. We are quite sure 
that in a very few years the American 
people will have alT the game they can 






THE GAME BREEDER 



93 



possibly eat, and at very reasonable 
-prices. The hostility against sport, 
which has been increasing everywhere, 
will disappear when the people find they 
can have cheap game to eat. Two meth- 
ods of game saving are now being tried 
side by side in the States which have 
enacted game breeders' laws. Already 
it is evident which system produces the 
most game, and, fortunately, the fewest 
petty crimes, many of which are . ridicu- 
lous. 



CORRESPONDENCE. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

I desire to thank you for that splen- 
did little manual, "Game Farming for 
Profit and Pleasure," issued by the Her- 
cules Powder Co. 

I have not yet joined the ranks of the 
game farmers, but look forward to the 
time when I shall be one of them. The 
""more game" movement as expounded 
oy you is sound and scientific and de- 
serving of the encouragement of all 
■sportsmen. 

Chas. B. Morss. 

Massachusetts. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

I have just received from the Her- 
cules Powder Co. its most interesting 
pamphlet on game farming. I suspect 
that you had a hand in the preparation 
of it. 

A friend from New Jersey who has 
oeen shooting with me in our Vermont 
covers is seriously considering starting 
a game preserve. I told him not to lift 
a finger until he had consulted you. 

J. A. M. 

Vermont. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

I think The Game Breeder is a mighty 
good publication. 

Geo. P. McLean. 
Connecticut. 
Game Breeding in Wisconsin. 
The Game Breeder: 

My attention has been directed to an 
article in a recent number of your pub- 



lication recounting an experience in the 
domestication of quail and expressing 
regret that the laws of this State are 
such that the private propagation of 
quail and other wild fowls is not en- 
couraged and permitted. From this arti- 
cle false impressions might be obtained 
that Wisconsin has no game breeders' 
law, whereas the fact is that it has a very 
liberal one, due to the efforts of the Wis- 
consin Fish and Game Protection and 
Propagation League. For a number of 
years past the private propagation of 
nearly every variety of game has been 
permitted, but no practical scheme for 
the administration of the law was pre- 
scribed, and in the general revision of 
the Fish and Game Laws enacted by the 
Legislature of 1915, the law was entirely 
re-written, and as it now stands is a 
comprehensive and practical law which 
should encourage private propagation in 
this State. The law referred to is sec- 
tion 51 of Chapter 62 of the Statutes 
and briefly it provides that game farm- 
ers' licenses, which shall authorize the 
licensee to engage in the business of 
breeding and selling moose, caribou, elk, 
deer, beaver, fisher, martin, muskrats. 
raccoons or wild birds, shall be issued 
by the State Conservation Commission 
to any person duly applying therefor. 
It requires in the application a statement 
of the description of the premises to be 
covered by the license, that the same is 
wholly enclosed or an entire island, and 
that the applicant is the owner or licensee 
thereof. The law further provides that 
any licensee may possess, transport or sell 
such wild animals as particularly speci- 
fied. These requirements are that the 
quarters or loins of the carcasses of any 
moose, deer, etc., and the skins of any 
fur-bearing animals or the carcasses of 
any wild birds shall be tagged under the 
supervision of the State Conservation 
Commission with an indestructible tag 
or seal to be supplied by the commission 
to the licensee upon payment of the ac- 
tual cost thereof. A complete record of 
such tags and tagging is required to be 
kept at the office of the State Conserva- 
tion Commission and the tags are re- 
quired to remain attached to the carcass 



94 



THE GAME BREEDER 



of birds until the same shall have been 
consumed. The law further specifically 
authorizes the sale of such tagged game 
by dealers in meat or hotel or restaurant 
keepers. It is further required that the 
licensee on or before the 15th of May of 
each year shall report to the State Con- 
servation Commission for the period 
from the 1st of May to the 30th of April 
next preceding, the total number of such 
wild animals killed, transported or sold, 
the names of the persons to whom the 
same were transported or sold, and the 
names of the persons by whom the same 
were tagged and sealed, which report 
should be verified by an affidavit of the 
licensee. 

It will be noted that the tagging must 
be under the supervision of the State 
Conservation Commission. This does 
not mean that they must send a Con- 
servation warden to do the tagging, but 
they have authority, under the statute, 
to delegate that power to any officer or 
reputable citizen residing near the 
licensee. 

So far as I have been able to ascer- 
tain no one in this State as yet has taken 
advantage of this law for the propaga- 
tion of game for commercial gain. How- 
ever, I find a great many people are be- 
coming intensely interested in the sub- 
ject and are following with interest the 
experience of others in this new indus- 
try, and it is not unlikely that within a 
short time the propagation of wild game 
for market will be engaged in quite as 
extensively as it now is in the Eastern 
States. 

Wisconsin. R. B. Graves. 



captivity or in semi-captivity is not very 
large. Many quail will be imported 
from Mexico, provided the importations 
are not preventetd by the unsettled con- 
dition of the country or by those who 
insist on holding birds in coops at the 
border until the birds become afflicted 
with diseases due to the confinement. The 
quail should be shipped through to reput- 
able dealers and inspected on the game 
farms, if inspection is deemed necessary. 

There will be many more pheasants 
and ducks sold in the markets as food 
than there were last season, but the 
prices will remain up, no dobut, since 
there are not enough birds to fully sup- 
ply the demand. Ducks will bring from 
$2 to $3 per pair. Pheasants will sell 
readily at $5.00 per pair or more. 

The prices of ducks will be much lower 
of course, in states which permit the 
sale of birds taken on public waters. 



The Game Market. 

The demand for live game is increas- 
ing. _ Many sportsmen who intend 
breeding next season are taking our ad- 
vice and are purchasing pheasants and 
ducks early. There is, as usual, a wait- 
ing list with all the dealers for quail. 
Those who order early will get quail as 
long as the supply holds out. We predict 
there will be more birds sold this season 
than there were last year, but we are 
not at liberty to say where the dealers 
get their birds. The number bred in 



Still Remington. 
In view of rumors which have gained 
circulation to the effect that this com- 
pany has changed hands, we feel called 
upon to advise that the "Remington 
Arms Co. of Delaware," whose plant is 
located at Eddystone, Pa., and which 
was sold to the Midvale Steel and Ord- 
nance Co., was merely a subsidiary 
company organized solely for the execu- 
tion of a large order for military rifles. 
No sporting arms have been manufac- 
tured at that plant, nor was there any 
intention to manufacture such. It was 
this plant only that was sold to the Mid- 
vale company. 

The Remington Arms Works at Ilion, 
N. Y., the Union Metallic Cartridge 
Works and the new Remington Arms 
Wojks at Bridgeport, Conn., and the 
Remington Arms-Union Metallic Cart- 
ridge Works at Windsor, Canada, have 
undergone no change whatever and none 
is contemplated. These works are still 
being conducted under the same name, 
same ownership and same management 
as heretofore. 
Remington Arms-Union Metallic 

Cartridge Co. 
C. L. Reierson, 
Asst. to Vice-Pres. and Gen'l Mgr. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



95 










'< ., 




An Odd Shot. 

The board meetings of The Game 
Conservation Society are always inter- 
esting, and often lively. At the Novem- 
ber meeting the following story was re- 
ferred to the standing committee on na- 
ture fakers and faking, with the request 
that it make a special report on the re- 
markable performance of William E. 
Scripture, an attorney of Rome, N. Y. 
Mr. W. P. Doyle wrote to the New York 
World as follows : 

(Special to The World.) 

Rome, N. Y., Oct. 14.— Attorney William 
E. Scripture, Jr., had an unusual experience 
yesterday while hunting near this city. He 
fired at a woodcock that flew up ahead of him, 
and as the bird fell dead Mr. Scripture was 
amazed to see a rabbit jump high from a 
thicket and drop dead. 

The rabbit had been hiding in the thicket 
thirty feet beyond the woodcock, and part of 
the charge that did not hit the bird went on 
and killed the rabbit which the gunner had not 
seen. 

Soon after, Mr. Scripture's dog "pointed" a 
partridge. The hunter gave the dog a com- 
mand which must have been understood to 
mean "get it." At any rate, the dog jumped 
and caught the scared bird in its mouth and 
brought it to his master. The bird was found 
'to be so badly bitten by the dog that Mr. 
Scripture had to kill it, making three kinds 
of game for the afternoon with one shotgun 
shell used. W. P. Doyle. 

To the Editor : This differs from many 
rural stories sent to the New York papers in 
that it is absolutely true. I have read your 
report on the Bureau of Accuracy and Fair 
Play and found it exceptionally interesting. 

W. P. D. 

The committee was instructed to have 

one of its special cartoonists diagram 



the incident and to forward all the papers 
in the case with the drawing to Mr. 
John Fanning, ballistic expert, for a re- 
port on the possibility of a shot fired at 
a woodcock in the air killing a rabbit on 
the -ground 30 feet away. One of the 
members of the board said Mr. Scrip- 
ture's weapon certainly was "some scat- 
ter gun." The question if the "part- 
ridge" was out of season and if the dog 
should be fined was referred to The 
American Protective Association, with 
the request that they detail a special offi- 
cer to investigate the possible crime. 
♦ 

Original Sportsmen's Show Revived. 

The original Sportsmen' Show has 
been revived. The next Exhibition will 
be opened Monday morning, March 15, 
and closed Wednesday evening, March 
22, at Madison Square Garden, the 
show's birthplace. 

Sportsmen's Shows were originated 
by Captain J. A. H. Dressel. The init- 
ial show was held May 13-18, 1895, at 
the Garden. The shows of the future 
will be held by the National Sports- 
men's Show Corporation, under the aus- 
pices of the National Sportsmen's As- 
sociation. 

The Shows will be managed by Cap- 
tain J, A. H. Dressel and Allen S. Wil- 
liams. In the 1916 Show, there will be 
features to be shown in Sportsmen's 
Shows for the first time. Game reg- 
ions will be well represented, especially 
Canadian, and the guides, amid woodsy 
surroundings, will be present in force. 



$6 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Book Reviews. 

The Farmer's Handbook; instructions 
in the use of high explosives for clear- 
ing land, planting and cultivating trees, 
drainage, ditching and subsoiling. 
Copyright 1915, E. I. du Pont de 
Nemours Powder Co., Wilmington, 
Delaware. 

This is a handsome illustrated book 
of 184 pages of interesting, instructive 
and valuable matter about the use of 
■explosives on the farm. . Many of our 
readers now own country places and 
they will be glad to know how they can 
quickly be improved and made to yield 
more abundantly by the use of dynamite 
for clearing, cultivating and sub-soiling. 
Our readers who are going in for wild 
ducks will be especially interested to 
learn that small ponds and ditches can 
be made for the water fowl very inex- 
pensively. Some of our readers have 
used dynamite to make duck ponds and 
-they found it did the work quickly and 
well. The writer once reared over 2,500 
wild ducks beside a small circular ditch 
dug by hand in a meadow. The work 
was slow and it was hardly completed 
when the breeding season opened. This 
work could have been done in a few 
hours by using dynamite. It is well to 
make the breeding pond circular in 
form, leaving an island in the center. 
The ducks will enjoy the island and find 
it a safe retreat from cats and some 
other ground vermin. 

We would advise our readers to write 
to the du Ponts and ask them to send 
this book. It is evidently for free dis- 
tribution to those who expect to use ex- 
plosives. 

♦- 

Modern Game Protection. 

The Hon. Trinidad C. de Baca, Game 
and Fish Warden of New Mexico, has 
issued one of the best State reports we 
have seen. He well says : "Private pre- 
serves evidently constitute a most im- 
portant factor in modern game protec- 
tion " 

"Modern" is an excellent word to ap- 
ply to present-day methods, which are 
decidedly different from those of a few 
years ago. 



A few good game ranches in New 
Mexico easily could supply the people of 
the State with all the game, big and 
small, they would care to eat. 

A few good-sized ranches soon should 
supply the California markets with all 
the quail, venison and other game the 
people of that State would care to eat. 
Some large game ranches in New Mex- 
ico also could keep the New York mar- 
kets full of cheap game and such in- 
dustry would make the ranch owners 
rich; would furnish a desirable food for 
New York, and, best of all, it would 
save the game for all time to come. We 
expect great things from New Mexico 
and the other Western States within the 
next year or two. Thousands of deer, 
wild turkeys, quail and other game and 
trout are already owned by breeders. 
The ratio of increase when "modern 
game protection" is applied always is 

geometrical. 

*- 

L B O. 

Our readers should try the L B O gun 
oil, advertised on another page. Since 
the oil is endorsed by John Fanning it 
must be good, and our readers should 
use it because it is advertised in The 
Game Breeder and thus becomes one of 
the celebrated "more game" products 
which are contributing to make North 
America the biggest game-producing 
country in the world. 

No doubt double guns as good as the 
high-grade Parkers, and repeating guns 
as good as those made by the Reming- 
tons may be made in foreign countries. 
Readers of The Game Breeder, however, 
should buy Remington and Parker guns 
because these guns have contributed to 
restore field sports in America. The 
contributions made by these gun makers 
have been partly used in stopping the 
prohibition of quail shooting on Long 
Island ; they have been used to open up 
some benighted States where field sports 
were prohibited, or nearly so. One of 
our smaller bird advertisers says in a 
letter to-day he had 48 inquiries for 
pheasants last week. "More pheasants" 
means more shooting and more guns, and 
more L B O. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



97 



Our business is 
making guns. 



For over 50 years we 
have made big guns, 
little guns, good guns — 
The "OLD RELIABLE" 
Parker Guns. 




Send for catalogue and 20 bore booklet. FREE. 

PARKER BROS., Meriden, Conn. Lwltrsi 



Our Wild Fowl and Waders 

A PRACTICAL BOOK ON DUCK BREEDING 
PRICE,- $1 .50 

THE GAME BREEDER, ISO Nassau Street, New York City 



O^IRIBO PEOTI2ST 

3?a/be:o_1jecL 

SPECIAL DEER FEED 



^r 



-^ 



^ 



REDUCE ME FEED Bill 

WITH 



^ 



^uw% 



4> 



One of our Customers writes us: 

Eldred, New York, October 26th, 1915. 

Sugar I,and Feed Co. , 

445 West 45 th Street, 

New York City. 

Gentlemen: — I am pleased to state that your Carbo 

Protin, special deer feed, gave me extreme satisfaction. 

The deer like it very much and they look splendid, much 

better than when fed with oats and corn, which is too heavy. 

Yours very truly, 

GUIDO BISCHOF, 
Eldred Deer Park, Sullivan Co., N. Y. 

We deliver even small quantities for the 

Special Deer Feed ^ rSt tr ' 3 '* 

Sugar Land Feed Co. of New York, Inc. 

445 "West 45tK Street Phone: Bryant 6275 New YorR City 



PATENTED 



* 



*£>• 



FEEDS BEST, COSTS LESS 




98 



THE GAME BREEDER 



STONY LONESOME GAME FARM 

Mallard Ducks and 
Mongolian Pheasants 

We offer for immediate delivery (limited number) of 

Mallard Ducks and Mongolian Pheasants 

and will take orders for eggs, delivery in the spring. 

ADDRESS 

129 Front Street, New York City, 

or JOHN FOSTER, West Hartland, Connecticut 



Extra Fine 

MALLARDS 

Strong Fliers 

Raised on Niagara River, where 
they had unlimited chance to fly. 
Are exceptionally strong on the 
wing and splendid specimens for 
brood stock. We have pure Mon- 
golians, Ring Necks, Pit Games and 
English Setters. 

River Lawn Farm 

Grand Island Erie County 

New York 



NOW IS THE TIME 

If you expect to have fertile eggs next Spring, 
to buy your Birds; don't wait until midwinter or 
next spring ; you will be disappointed. 

We Offer For Immediate Delivery. 

Silver, Goldens, Ringnecks, Lady Amhursts, 
Reeves, Elliotts, Mongolians, Swinhoes, Versicolors, 
Impeyans, Manchurian Eared and Melanotus 
Pheasants. We are now booking orders for eggs 
for Spring and Summer delivery of any of the above 
varieties. We quote Ringneck eggs $3.50 per 
dozen, $25.00 per hundred ; Green head mallard 
eggs $3.50 perdozen, $25.00 per hundred. We also 
offer for sale Single Comb Buff and Blue Orping- 
tons, Rhode Island Reds, Japanese Silkies and 
Longtails. Wild Turkeys, Blue, White Japanned and 
Specifier Peafowls, as well as the following Ducks : 
Greenhead and black mallard, pintail, redhead, 
gadwall, wood, mandarin and Formosan teal, 
shovelers, baldpate and Blue Bill and green wing 
teal. 

WANTED 

White Peahens. In Pheasants, any of the 
tragopons, firebacks. cheer, sommering, Elliotts, 
white crested Kalij, Peacocks. Anderson's Lineatus. 
Also Garganey and ring teal. In writing quote 
number, sex and lowest cash price. On receipt of 
20 cents in stamps will send Colortype Catalogue 
of Pheasants. 

CHILES & CO. 

Mt. Sterling, Kentucky 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



99 



Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Hungarian Partridges 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders 
for these birds and for years I have filled 
practically all of the large State orders for both 
Partridges and Pheasants. 




•V^Y^ 



c^v ,***f^. 




Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck, Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners. 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 best 
Royal Swans of England. I have fine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS. CRANES, PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have BO acres 
of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER, LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere— It will p»y you to do bo. Your visit solicited. 
I am only 60 miles from New York and 80 milee from Philadelphia. 



• . laasumm 


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Department V. 



WM J. MACKENSEN 

YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 



la writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Gtme." 



100 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Valuable Game Birds 


POR SALE 


3 Pair Chinese Horned Geese 


1 Pair Blue Geese 


3 Pair Lesser Snow Geese 


1 Pair Eastern Canada Geese 


3 Pair Western Canada Geese 


1 Pair Barnacle Geese 


1 Pair Hutchin's Geese 


3 Pair Cackling Geese 


1 Pair Hawaiian Geese 


2 Pair Ross Snow Geese 


2 Pair White Fronted Geese 


1 Pair Anderson's Lineatus 


Pheasants 


1 Pair Australian Emus 


1 Pair Wanga-wanga Pigeons 


8 Pair Australian Green Wing 


Pigeons. 


ROBISON BROS. 


1260 Market St. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 




The Best in 
Pointers 

Puppies, Broken Dogs 

and Brood Bitches, by 

Champion Comanche 

Frank, Fishel's Frank 

and Champion Nicholas 

R. 

Write me your wants, please. 

U. R. FISHEL 
Box 35 HOPE, IND. 



Our Wild Fowl and Waders 

Practical Book on Duck Breeding 
for Sport and Profit 

$1.50 

The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. C. 



M. G. and F. G. L 

Can you guess it? 







THE LURE OF WILD RICE 

bring Ducks hundreds of miles— my Wild Rice 
Seed for planting is the finest of the year— also 
Wild Celery, Wapato, and other natural foods 
that Ducks love. 

Terrell's Famous Wild Fowl 

Strong, healthy, fresh from their native haunts — 
for breeding or stocking purposes. I have the 
Wild Fowl that are considered best in the 
country. Mallards, Black Ducks, Canvasbacks, 
Wood Ducks, Pintails, Teal, Geese, Pheasants, 
etc., and Wild Mallard eggs in Spring from 
birds of strong flying strain. 

Write for My Free Instructive Booklet. 

CLYDE B. TERRELL 

Naturalist 
Department P OSHKOSH, WISCONSIN 



Game Birds 

I am offering for immediate delivery 
the following hand-reared birds. These 
birds are in every way extra choice, being 
thoroughly acclimated, requiring no 
housing in the winter and most desirable 
for breeding in the coming Spring. 

Genuine WILD Mallard ducks $5.00 per pair 

Decoy Mallards 3.00 " 

Wood duck 16.00 " " 

Mated Canadian geese 10.00 

Also Pintails, Black duck, Widgeon, 
Red-heads, Blue-bills, Green- and Blue- 
Winged Teal, etc., and several varieties 
of Wild Geese. , 

RING NECK Pheasants $5.50 per pair 

Golden Pheasants 15.00 " 

Also Silver, Amherst, Reeves Pheas- 
ants and Common Bantams for pheasant 
rearing. 

Safe Delivery Guaranteed. 

JOHN HEYWOOD 
Box B Gardner* Mass. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



101 



DALCARLIA GAME FARM 

Wild Turkeys, English Pheasants, Quail, Plymouth Rock, 
Rhode Island Red and Brown Leghorn Chickens, White 
African, Pearl and Lavender Guineas. 

Located at HANCOCK, MARYLAND 

Address all communications to 
HENRY P. BRIDGES, 1109 Calvert Building, BALTIMORE, MD. 



MADISON SQUARE GARDEN 

"America's Leading Poultry Show 



99 



27th Annual Exhibition 



December 31st, 1915, to January 5th, 1916 °„Ts N »nda^ a jtn Da 2 y 

WHERE A WIN WINS MOST 

Entries close Dec. 15, 1915. 

For premium list and other particulars write 

CHARLES D. CLEVELAND, Secy.-Supt., Madison Square Garden, New York City 




Established 1 860 Telephone 4569 Spring 

PRED SAUTER 

Leading Taxidermist of America. 
42 Bleecker Street New York City 

Corner Lafayette Street Subway Station at the Door. 

Specialist in All Branches of Taxidermy \ 

Write for Illustrated Catalogue 



IS 



GUN 
CLEANER 



[BO 



has been found satisfactory to a large 
army of sportsmen and trap-shooters. 
You will find it so if you will give it 
a trial. It is a lubricating nitro solvent 
and rust and lead remover of the 
highest efficiency. Sold as follows: 
bottle of Gun Cleaner, 25 cents; 
handy package containing cleaner and 
oil, 25 cents, and large pint club cans, 
$2 00. We will send a 25 cent pack- 
age by mail anywhere in the United 
States, and the can plus 25 cents to 
pay parcel post or express. 

LBO is endorsed by J. S. Fanning 
of the Du Pont Powder Company of 
New York, and Fred Gilbert of Spirit 
Lake, Iowa. 



LBO COMPANY 

PORT RICHMOND NEW YORK 



102 



THE GAME BREEDER 




Wild Water Fowl 

"Our Specialties." 

Wood Ducks, Mandarins, Wild Black 
Mallards for stocking game preserves. 
Safe delivery guaranteed. 500 Can- 
ada Wild Geese, $8.00 to $10.00 per 
pair. Australian, South American, 
Carolina Swans. 200 trained English 
Decoy Ducks, guaranteed Callers and 
Breeders, $5.00 per pair. Eggs, 15 for 
$2.00. Mallards and Canada Geese 
must be bought NOW to breed this 
Spring. For prices of other wild fowl 
apply to 

WHEALTON WILD WATER-FOWL FARMS 
Chincoteague Island, Virginia 



SOM33THIl\rG 1STHXPV '. 




Defender Foeket Knife 

A Pocket Knife and Pistol Combined Which Fires 
a .22 Cartridge, Blank or Ball. No Recoil. 
Accurate and effective as any regular pistol, also a first- 
class pocket knife for both ladies and gentlemen. Not a 
toy. Handsome in appearance. Put up in buckskin case 
and packed in neat box, $3. Send Cash or Money Order. 

EASTERN TRADING CO., 1790 Broadway, New York 



Subscribe to The Game Breeder, $1.00. 



The Warren R. Leach Game Park 

DEER, BISON AND OTHER BIG GAME 
WILD GEESE AND WILD DUCKS 

WRITE FOR PRICE LISTS 



Warren R* Leach 



Rushville, Illinois 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game.' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



103 




A Blasted Pond 



Dynamite for Ducks 

Don't shoot them with dynamite. Its appetite 
is so voracious there would be little left for you to eat. 

The idea is to let Du Pont Dynamite dig a duck 
pond where the toothsome amphibians will love to linger 
against the time when Du Pont Powder gets them for 
your table. 

Write for Handbook of Explosives No. ^4S, con- 
taining full directions for making ponds with dynamite. 

E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Company, 

Established 1802 



Wilmington, 



Delaware. 









104 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Fathers Gift to theBou 

MlV ' , JI&&i^£ : : -&*P 



■'*•' ' 



■HE Sons of Sportsmen Fathers are up against a 
problem. 

Imbued with all of Father's respect and ad- 
miration for a fine gun, the boy can only voice his 
desire to own a 



.22 REPEATER 

and "hope that Father will get him one." 

Give that boy of yours a Remington-UMC .22 Re- 
peater this Christmas. If you haven't got a .22 of your 
own, you'll often find yourself borrowing the boy's. 
It is that kind of rifle. 

Remington Arms- 
Union Metallic Cartridge Co. 

233 Broadway, New York 
London, England Windsor, Ontario 

Grand Prize— Highest Award for MODERN Arms and 
Ammunition, Panama-Pacific International Exposition 




REMINGTON 
UMC 



Remington- 
UMC Slide Ac- 
tion Repeater — 
Remington Solid 
Breech and Ham- 
merless. Takes 
fifteen .22 Shorts, 
twelve .22 Longs 
or eleven .22 Long 
Rifle Cartridges. 

Takes down with- 
our tools. At any 
dealer who shows 
the 

Red Ball Mark 
of Remington- 
UMC— 
the Sign of Sports- 
men's Headquar- 
ters in every town . 



*\ 



REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 




Beautiful Farm 

Plainfield, Hampshire County, Mass. 

Suitable for Game Farm or 
Preserve — at Villa View, a noted 
Summer Resort for 30 years. 
Fifteen miles North of Williams- 



burg. 



tiT** %£r* t&* 



Trout Ponds and Trout Streams 

Orchards bearing a great variety 

of Fruits — Berries abundant 

dr* t&* <^* 

Excellent Farm and Wood- 
lands. House, including Furni- 
ture, Barns, Ice Houses, Hen Houses, Carriage Houses. 

HORSES /. COWS 
SWINE IMPLEMENTS 

JAMES F. GURNEY, Owner 

Care GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, New York City 



The above is an old stamping ground of The Dean of American 
Sportsmen, Charles Hallock, who says it will make a most desirable 
shooting box for some reader of The Game Breeder.— Editor. 



V 



■J 



i 



i 

+ 



What Rearing Food Do You Use? 

It is an easy matter to hatch Pheasant Chicks, 

but it takes knowledge and experience 

to rear them successfully. 

We cannot give you the experience but we can furnish 
you with the best Game Rearing Foods that the market 
affords; furthermore, if you follow instructions as set forth 
in "Pheasant Culture," you will not only be successful but 
you will find Pheasant Rearing both pleasurable and profitable. 



SPRATTS 

SPECIALLY 
PREPARED 

MEALS 



for poultry and game have been on the market for over £0 
years and a trial will convince you that there are no foods 
that can take their place. 




Send for "Pheasant Culture,'' price 25c. 
"Poultry Culture " sent on receipt of 10c. 



SPRATTS PATENT LIMITED 

Main Offices at NEWARK, N. J. 

Depots at SAN FRANCISCO ST. LOUIS CLEVELAND MONTREAL 



xmwtmwix 



mr~ 



$loo p er Year 



^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiii 



Single Copies 10 



s\ 



S. 



THE- 



GAME 



VOL. VIII. 



JANUARY, 1916 



The Object of this magazine- is 



to Make North Am erica the- 5iggest 
iGahe Producing Country in the World 



CONTENTS 



Survey of the Field — Quite a " More Game " Dinner — Game 

Breeders in California — Game and the Motor — An Automobile 

and a Deer — Fatalities — A Shot at the Teacher — Vermont — 

Cheap Pheasants — Trouble in Illinois— Trout in New Jersey 

— Late Season Catches— Pheasants and Zeppelins — Bringing 

Home the Game — More Crime Zones. 

A Dakota Game Farm 

The Heath Hen on Martha's Vineyard - 

The Ring-Necked Pheasant 

The Work of Last Year 

The Prairie Grouse - 

The Wild Duck Dinner 

Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves 



H. J. Jager 

William Day 

Harold C. Bryant 

By the Editor 

D. W. Huntington 

Suburban Reporter 

By Our Readers 



The California Game Farm— Maggots— Blackhead in Turkeys 
—Lead Poisoned Mallards— A Deer Trouble— Dynamite to 
Stop Prairie Fires -Will a Dog Run from a Rabbit?— More 
Dinners — Malformed Deer Horns. 

Editorials — The Trouble in New Jersey — Tempora Mutantur. 
Correspondence — Outings and Innings — Trade Notes, i 



No. 4 



r* 



PUBLISHED BY 



THE GAME CONSERVATION SOCIETY, Inc. 

NEW YORK CITY U.J.A 



^nllllHIIIIIHMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIlrlHIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllimil'll., 



Game Breeders' Supplies 



WIRE - COOPS ■ TRAPS 

Wire 

For Deer Parks, Rearing Fields and Kennels 

Coops and Hatching Boxes 

Traps 

For Ground and Winged Vermin 

Egg Turners, Egg Boxes for Shipping 

And all Appliances for Game Farms and Preserves 



I shall be pleased to correspond with game breeders 
who wish to purchase wire, coops, traps or any appli- 
ances for the game farm and preserve. 

Special advice given to all contemplating the game 
breeders' industry. 



F. T. OAKES 

Room 622 
150 Nassau Street New York, U. S. A. 

I do not sell live deer and game birds, or eggs 



THE GAME BREEDER 



105 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 2 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 

THE GAME BREEDER 



150 Nassau Street 



New York City 



LIVE GAME 



PHEASANT AND JAPANESE 
Eggs for sale; several varieties. 
E. Park Ave., Haddonfield, N. J. 



PHOENIX FOWL 
S. V. REEVES, 114 



QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 

other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 

WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 

antry and Game Park. 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now — the surest way to start 
breeding this species. We are the oldest and largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country Black and White 
Swans.Wild Ducks, etc , for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island. Va. 

WILD TURKEYS — For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County, Pa. 

FOR SALE — Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (iot) 

FOR SALE — GINSENG AND GOLDEN SEAL 
plants and seed ; Amhersts, Goldens, Silvers, Ring- 
necks HELEN BARTLETT, Cassopolis, Michigan. 

FOR SALE— LIGHT BRAHMAS; BLACK LANG- 
shans ; Cochin Bantams ; Rhode Island Reds ; Guineas ; 
Peacocks ; Shepherd pups, $3.00. JOHN TALBOT, South 
Bend, Indiana. 

FOR SALE— GOLDEN AND SILVER PHEASANTS. 
Splendid birds. This year's hatch. Prices right. 
GENE RAHLMAN, Santa Ana, Calif. 

WILD MALLARD DUCKS-DECOYS; GOOD FLY- 
ing strain. 100 birds, $110.00; 12 birds, $15.00; (less, 
$1.87)4 each\ no limit. Order now and from this adver- 
tisement. Send draft. Shipped Mondays. Eggs in sea- 
son, $10 00 hundred, March 1 to July 15. C. E. BREMAN 
CO., Danville, 111. 

FOR SALE- WILD MALLARD DUCKS. $1.25 EACH, 
3 for $3.50. Eggs for sale in season. A. J. APPLEBY, 
Mgr., Cherry Farm, Chester, N. J. 

5 VARIETIES OF PHEASANTS. Wild Mallards, 
Wild Geese and game Fourteen varieties of stand- 
ard Poultry, including Turkeys. Also Elk. List free. 
G. H. HARRIS, Taylorville, 111. 

FIRST PRIZE WINNING RINGNECK PHEASANTS. 
Place your orders for stock and eggs now, also several 
varieties of bantams and hares. Prices reasonable. 
CHAS. G. BOLTON, ZiegUrville, Penn. 

WILD MALLARD DUCKS, 100 BIRDS, $12500; 12 
birds, $17 00; (less $1.50 each) no limit Order now and 
from this advertisement. Send draft. Shipped Mondays 
C. BREMAN CO., Danville, 111. 

PEA-FOWLS, $12.00 A PAIR; WILD GEESE $ro.oo A 
pair; Golden Pheasants $i* 00 a pair; Silver Pheasants 
$12 00 a pair; English Pheasants $5. 50 a pair ; White Chinese 
Geese $8.00 a pair ; Mandarin Ducks. $14 00 a pair ; Jumbo 
Homers $1.00 a pair; Jumbo Hen Pigeons $2 00 a pair; 
Jumbo Belgian Hares $3 00 a pair. We buy and sell every- 
thing. Circular free. DETROIT BIRD STORE, Detroit, 
Mich 



WOOD DUCKS AND MALLARDS 
FOR SALE— Wood ducks and wild mallards for 
breeding stock; fine decoys. GLENN CHAPMAN, 
Midway, Conn. 



DEER FOR SALE 

Seven Tame Northern Wisconsin Deer. Bucks and 
Does, $25.00 each. F. FERRON, 416 Wisconsin 
Avenue, Oak Park, Illinois. 



PURE BRED WILD WATERFOWL AT FOLLOW- 
ing prices: Mallards. $3.00 per pair. Pintails, $2.50 per 
pair. Green Wing Teal, $4.00 per pair. Blue Wing Teal, 
$300 per pair. Also redheads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Canvasbacks, Spoonbills, at reasonable prices, for propa- 
gating and scientific purposes. GEORGE J. KLEIN, 
Ellinwood, Kansas. 

FOR SALE— MELANOTUS, MONGOLIAN, SWIN. 
hoe eggs in season, Reeves, Amherst, Golden, Silver, 
Ringnecks stock and eggs in season. PHILIP H. TROUT, 
Kingsbridge Road, Mt Vernon, N. Y. 

FOR SALE-MOTTLED JAVAS, GOLDEN WYAN- 
DOTTS. Black Wyandotts, White Minorcas single 
comb, White Guineas, Rouen Ducks, White Indian 
Games, $2 00 to $3.00 per pair ; Egyptian Geese, full 
plumage. JOHN BIRD. Lockport, N. Y. 

RINGNECK PHEASANTS FOR SALE. ISAAC 
SPENCER, 10 Wayne Ave., Ipswich, Mass. 

FOR SALE—ONE PAIR OF DEER. Bred regularly. 
Also one extrabuck. Will sell cheap or take pheasants, 
wild duck or pea fowl for part payment. OAK HILL 
FARM, Moline, 111. 

WE HAVE FOR SALE, 250 PAIRS OF STRONG 
hardy Ring Neck Pheasants, and 150 pairs of Mallard 
Ducks. All ready and in good condition for immediate 
shooting. Address DR. C. S. FOSTER, Treasurer, Kil- 
larney Game Breeding Association, Diamond Bank 
Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

FOR SALE— GROUSE. QUAIL AND PHEASANTS. 
Also mixed bantams for pheasant mothers. Nothing- 
better for the purpose. 50 cents each. O. R. AUSTIN, 
Foster Center, R. I. 



DOGS 

NORWEGIAN BEAR DOGS, IRISH WOLFHOUNDS, 
English bloodhounds, Russian wolfhounds, American fox- 
hounds, lion, cat, deer, wolf, coon and varmint dogs. All 
trained. Shipped on trial. Satisfacfion guaranteed or 
money refunded Purchaser to decide. Fifty page highly 
illustrated catalogue, 5 c. stamp. ROOKWOOD KEN- 
NELS, Lexington, Kentucky. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 
offer for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer hounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, bear and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaran'eed or money re- 
funded. Sixiy page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin, 



In writing to advenisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: 'Yours for Mote Giirae. 



106 



THE GAME BREEDER 



FOX, COON, SKUNK AND RABBIT HOUNDS 
broke to gun and field and guaranteed. The kind that 
are bred and trained for hunting by experienced hunters. 
Fox, coon and rabbit hound pups from pedigreed stock, 
and extra fine ones, price S5.00 each. Stamp for photo. 
H. C. LYTLE, Fredericksburg, Ohio. 

CHESAPEAKE BAY DUCK RETRIEVERS, PEDI- 
greed and Registered— Best hunting stock in America. 
Bred and raised on the Chesapeake Bay Shot over almost 
every day of the shooting season. Dogs and puppies for 
sale. JOHN SLOAN 7 , Lee Hall, Virginia. 



game: birds wanted 

i am in the market for california moun- 

tain partridges and masked Bob-whites. F. A., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New York. 

WANTED — TO PURCHASE BELGIAN HARES. 
State price for large and small lots. L. D HATFIELD, 
138 East 38th St., N. Y. City. 

WANTED, RUFFED GROUSE AND NORTHERN 
quail for breeding purposes. State price and number. 
LOUIS WILL, Syracuse, N. Y. 

PHEASANTS WANTED. ONLY RARE VARIETIES 

such as Tragopans, Manchurian, Firebacks, Impeyans, 
etc. Kindly quote price. A J. MERLE, Alameda, Calif. 

SWINHOES 
WANTED— Swinhoes. State price and number. R. A. 
" CHILES & CO., Mt. Sterling, Ky. 

WANTED— FANCY AVIARY PHEASANTS, RING- 
necks, peacocks, partridges, quail, prairie chickens, 
wood and mandarin ducks. Quote prices. ROBERT 
HUTCHINSON, Littleton, Colo. 



game: eggs 



WILD MALLARD DUCK EGGS— APRIL TO MAY 

15, 1916, $15.00 per hundred May 16 to July 5, 1916, 
$12 00 per hunded. Safely packed (send draft). Order 
at once. First come, first served (no limit, no discount) 
C. BREMAN CO., Danville, Illinois. 

CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATED PHEASANT BREED- 
ers offer; January, February, mallard eggs. Stamp for 
price list, pheasant, quail, duck, eggs and birds. F. D. 
HOYT, Sec, Hayvvard, Calif. 

ORDERS FOR RINGNECK PHEASANT EGGS FOR 
season 1916— Fine healthy stock — Birds not related — 
Price $3.50 for 15. DR. HOLMAN, Attleboro, Mass. 

PHEASANT EGGS FOR SALE; STRICTLY FRESH 
and fertile. I am now booking orders for spring and 
summer. Amherst, Golden, Silver. GRAY PHEAS- 
ANTRIES, Ward Street, Orange, New Jersey. ' 



GAMEKEEPERS 



SITUATION WANTED-HEAD GAMEKEEPER OR 
Superintendent of large estate or game preserve. Very 
capable man to show sport. Thoroughly experienced 
rearing pheasants, partridge, quail and wild ducks. 
Management of incubators hatching pheasant and duck 
eggs. Also breeding, training and handling high class 
shooting dogs. Excellent trapper, competent manager. 
Reference present employer. GAMEKEEPER, 157 East 
69th St., New York. 



SITUATION WANTED 
Wanted situation as gamekeeper. Experienced in 
wild duck rearing and pheasants; the trapping of 
vermin, and dog breaking. Apply H. H., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



GAMEKEEPER—WANTS SITUATION FOR NEXT 
season. Skilled in pheasant and duck rearing. Will be 
open for employment January 1st. Reason for changing 
position is desire to get a change of climate for family 
A. E. JAMES, care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., 
New York City. 

HEAD GAMEKEEPER, SCOTCH, WANTS SITUA- 
tion. Thoroughly experienced in rearing pheasants, 
wild ducks, turkeys and partridges; 26 years' experien e. 
Can be highly recommended. R. J. M., care of The Game 
Breeder. 150 Nassau Street. New York. 

GAMEKEEPER REQUIRES SITUATION, UNDER- 
stands all duties. Best references from Europe and 
this country. Address M. F. care of The Game Breeder, 
150 Nassau Street. New York. 



WANTED—SITUATION 
As Superintendent or Manager on a game farm or 
preserve. Experienced in game and poultry breeding. 
Good reason for desiring change of location. Would 
take an interest in a game farm to breed game com- 
mercially. Address C, McM., office of The Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New York City. 



SUPERINTENDENT.- Wanted, by experienced man, 
25 years, first-class references from large estates and 
game farms where 3,000 pheasants have been penned and 
20,000 raised yearly. Understand the raising of all kinds 
of game and wild duck, management of incubators, testing 
of eggs, trapping of vermin, training and management of 
dogs and all duties making of rabbit wa/rens. W. B., 
care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St , N. Y City. 

EXPERIENCED UNDER KEEPER WANTED FOR 

Private Estate. Single man, age 20 to 24. Applv to 

T. B., care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New 

York City. 

WANTED— A THOROUGHLY EXPERIENCED MAN 
to raise pheasants, who understands planning and pro- 
tecting quail. English or Scotch, married with striall 
family. Location, Virginia. — T. D.. caie of The Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New Yotk City. 



REAL ESTATE 



Robinson Crusoe's Island Outdone! 

ST. VINCENT ISLAND, FLA., in the Gulf of 
Mexico, containing over 13,000 acres of pine for- 
est, fresh -water lakes, grassy savannahs, wild boar, 
native Virginia and Osceola deer, also imported 
India deer, wild cattle, turkey, millions of ducks and 
all varieties of fish. The Island with bungalows, 
hunting lodges, yacht, boats and vehicles for sale 
to close an estate. Easily protected. Many thou- 
sand acres of forest pine trees. Booklet sent on 
request. For information inquire V. M. PIERCE, 
663 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 



GAME BREEDING FARM WANTED 
Wanted to purchase or rent a small place in one 
of the Eastern States where game breeding is legal. 
A small farm with a pond and stream is desired. 
State price and location. M. A. C, care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



WANTED PARTNER— TO TAKE AN INTEREST 
in a deer park and preserve near New York. 150 acres 
fenced with eight foot fence, containing deer and an 
abundance of ruffed grouse. Two trout streams and 
splendid water for wild duck breeding. G. B.. care of The 
Game Breeder. 150 Nassau St., New York City. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

"PHEASANT FARMING." AN ILLUSTRATED 
practical booklet on pheasant rearing, postpaid, fifty 
cents Circular, all necessary pheasant equipment free. 
SIMPSON'S PHEASANT FARM, Corvallis, Oregon. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



107 



WHITE'S PRESERVE— WILD CELERY AND ALL 
kinds of wild duck food, plants and seeds. Also enter- 
tain sportsmen. Waterlily, Currituck Sound, North Caro- 
lina. 



SEND 25 CENTS FOR INFORMATION AND 
Price List of the most profitable fur-bearing animal, — 
THE BLACK SIBERIAN HARE. SIBERIAN HARE 
COMPANY, Hamilton, Canada. 



THE AMATEUR TRAINER 

By Ed. F. Haberlein 

A practical trainer of over 30 years' experience, whose 
system is op to date and stands onequaled. 

Neiv Edition Jast Oat. Illustrated. 
A plain, practical and concise, yet thorough guide 
in the art of training, handling and the correcting 
of faults of the bird do? subservient to the gun 
afield. Written especially for the novice, but 
equally valuable to the experienced handler. By 
following the instructions plainly given, every 
shooter possessed of a little common sense and 
patience can train his own dogs to perfection. 

Paper cover, $1.00; best full cloth binding and gold 
embossed, $1.50. Address 

THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, N. Y. 



Subscribe to " The Game Breeder/ 
$1.00 per Year. 



OUR FEATHERED GAME 

A manual on American Game 
Birds with shooting illustrations in 
color, and bird portraits of all 
American Game Birds. 

By D. W. HUNTINGTON 

Editor of The Game Breeder 

PRICE $2.00 



Our Big Game 

A manual on the big game of 
North America with pictures of all 
big game animals. 

By D. W. HUNTINGTON 

Editor of the Game Breeder 



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In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



T he Game Breeder 

Published Monthly. Entered as second-class matter, July g, 1915, at the Post Office, New York City, 

New York, under the Act of March 3, 187^. 



VOLUME VIII 



JANUARY, J9J6 
SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER 4 



It Was Quite a "More Game" Dinner. 

The veJoute of wild cluck ; the venison ; 
the wild mallards, and the tame turkeys 
(not related to New York protected 
birds) all were excellent. 

The speeches were interesting and in- 
structive ; the music was good. The din- 
ner was an important event because rep- 
resentatives of the associations con- 
cerned with the preservation of wild 
game and the propagation and profitable 
increase of the species desirable for food 
met together to dine in harmony on such 
game as now legally can be served and 
eaten. 

We are informed that a statement has 
been made that the dinner simply was a 
scheme to sell wild game in New York. 
Nothing could be further from the truth. 
Some wild turkeys, produced on game 
farms and preserves and owned by the 
producers, were donated to The Game 
Conservation Society for the dinner. A 
few additional turkeys were purchased 
from the gentlemen who own them. 
When a suggestion was made that pos- 
sibly such food could not be served at a 
subscription dinner the matter promptly 
was referred to the state game officer of 
New York, who was asked if there was 
any legal objection to serving such game. 
When we were notified that there was a 
law protecting species related to New 
York birds and that the department was 
opposed to our serving wild turkeys on 
this account, the birds promptly were 
dropped from the bill of fare and the de- 
partment was notified of the fact and 
thanked for the information. 

The Game Conservation Society we 
are sure is fully as law abiding as any 
of the other associations which were 
represented at the dinner. We are quite 



sure the Game Conservation Society- 
does not want anything which is not 
favored by the newly created depart- 
ments of applied ornithology and game 
breeding recently created by the Audu- 
bon Association and by the American 
Game Protective Association. As we 
understand the matter all of these orga- 
nizations agree that wild game should 
not be sold as food but that the laws 
should encourage game breeders to sell 
the food they now produce abundantly. 
All agree that such sales should be regu- 
lated and that the penalties for viola- 
tions should be sufficiently severe to ef- 
fectually prevent the marketing of wild 
game. 

Many members of the Camp Fire Club, 
who now own game in other states and 
who would like to. send some of their 
game to New York, attended the dinner. 
The meeting was harmonious and there 
was no "scheme" excepting the laudable 
one of giving prominence to the work of 
the associations which recently have an- 
nounced their intention of encouraging 
game breeding. 

Game Breeders in California. 

Believing that it is to the interest of 
game conservation to foster the breeding 
of game birds and mammals in captivity, 
California Fish and Game stands ready 
to publish short notes regarding the suc- 
cess of breeders in this State. Should 
the amount of material warrant it, a 
special department will be formed where- 
in those interested can obtain an avenue 
of publication. If you desire informa- 
tion as to methods of rearing game birds 
in captivity or wish to give publicity to 
success which you have obtained, write 
the editor of California Fish and Game. 



110 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Game and the Motor. 

In some States complaints are heard 
about those who run about in automo- 
biles, stopping here and there to take a 
shot at the game in places where any is- 
known to occur. Michigan recently has 
prohibited the use of automobiles in hunt- 
ing partridges. Since game laws are con- 
tagious and automobiles are numerous 
in many States, it seems likely the activi- 
ties of those who put in their time secur- 
ing "more laws" may be directed to stop- 
ping the use of automobiles for shooting. 
Next ! 

An Automobile and a Deer. 

Charles C. Nobles, in Maine Woods, 
says : 

"For the first time in my life I bagged a 
deer with an automobile. This automobile, I 
may assure you, lest you have a disposition 
to doubt the existence and the capabilities of 
Violet, is not trained. It is just an ordinary 
car, and Fleming and I, one night before the 
hunting season was on, were driving up from 
Masardis. All of a sudden something streaked 
In front of our headlights and struck on our 
windshield. We saw at once that it was a 
■deer. It was so much injured that we killed 
it to put it out of its misery. 

"Next arose a quandary. Was it illegal to 
eat a deer killed by this means out of season? 
Although I was nearly famished for lack of 
fresh meat, having been living off salt bacon 
for four or five days, I agreed with Fleming 
that on this delicate point appeal should be 
made to the game warden of the county. His 
reply, after due deliberation, was that it was 
not illegal and that was about the best veni- 
son I ever tasted. 

Fatalities. 

Reports of the usual number of fatal- 
ities due to people being mistaken for 
deer in public woods are published from 
time to time in the daily papers. Eleven 
persons, including one woman, lost their 
lives in Maine. Maine has a law making 
the killing of persons by mistake when 
hunting, a crime punishable by a fine of 
$1,000 or imprisonment, and it is said 
there will be a number of prosecutions 
this year. 

Many deplorable accidents which re- 
sulted in those handling guns being killed 
or seriously injured also are reported. 
Thus far we have not heard of a single 
accident of any kind in the deer parks 



and preserves owned by readers of The 
Game Breeder. 

Massachusetts does not' permit the 
shooting of high-power rifles at deer and 
it seems reasonable that such shooting 
should be prohibited in farming regions 
in other States. The time will come, no 
doubt, when it will be necessary to regu- 
late the deer shooting in public forests 
and parks so that it will proceed in a 
more orderly manner and gunners in the 
woods may not be obliged to face un- 
known dangers. 

A Shot at the Teacher. 

A reader sends this about the danger 
in Minnesota: 

Carrie Brown, a school teacher in Aitkin 
County, just across the Mille Lacs County line, 
was on her way home from the school house 
when a city deer hunter took a shot at her, 
but missed her by a small margin. He was 
the third man to shoot at her since the big 
game season opened, November 10. 

Now Miss Brown has laid away her giddy 
masquerade suit as "no use." 

One chrome yellow waist with large black 
spots. 

One red and white striped skirt. 

One snow white felt hat with feather of 
robiri's-egg blue. 

One black silver spangled belt. 

One pair magenta gloves. 

One pair gray suede shoes. 

One parasol of sea green, bound with mauve 
ribbon. 

One black fox muff . with lavender ribbon 
neck support. 

John Elmhurst, a forest ranger, says, in 
addition to an outfit that looked like a riot in 
color Miss Brown carried tied around her muff 
a bell which tinkled loudly as she walked. 

He said that all over Northern Minnesota 
women school teachers and others who have 
had to be about much, have worn the "loud- 
est" obtainable colors as a means of saving 
their lives. 

Miss Brown, he said, kept adding a bit of 
color, from day to day, but nevertheless, when 
she had taken nearly everything in the rain- 
bow, a hunter still shot at her. 

"It's a wonder, there aren't dead men all 
over Northern Minnesota," Mr. Elmhurst 
said. "The Woods were full of city hunters 
shooting at each other and at everything that 
stirred. And the kill of deer was the smallest 
for a long time, though the woods were full 
of deer."— N. Y. World. 

Vermont. 

A fishing license law has been enacted 
in Vermont. Since much of the revenue 



THE GAME BREEDER 



111 



of the Game and Fish Departments is 
expended for fish hatcheries the sports- 
men often have urged in other States 
that the anglers should contribute. About 
6,000 deer were shot in Vermont during 
the open season. A yellow horse was 
also dropped in the shafts to the surprise 
of his owner, who was driving on a road. 
The game commissioner heard a story 
that a colt, which had just been placed in 
a barn to remain during the deer season, 
was killed by a stray bullet which came 
from a distance. 

The use of long-range rifles in heavy 
woods has been the cause of many deaths 
of sportsmen and others. It seems 
doubtful if rifles should be used in the 
farming regions of Vermont, where many 
farm animals are in the fields and where 
many travellers are on the highways. 

Cheap Pheasants. 

One of our California game breeders, 
writing to the Game Census, says most 
of our birds are sold by July or August. 
"The pheasant business," he adds, "is 
being ruined in California. Imported 
birds from Japan in cold storage here 
sell at $8.00 per dozen, so we can sell no 
more to the hotels. Politics may do the 
rest to finish the business." 

Cold storage birds from abroad have 
not been found to be very satisfactory in 
New York, and the hotels are paying ex- 
cellent prices for pheasants and ducks 
from the game farms and preserves. 
They cannot get nearly enough, and we 
hope it will not be long before California 
breeders have the same rights in the New 
York markets which foreign breeders 
and New York State breeders now have. 

The California Commission in a re- 
cent publication, California Fish and 
Game, offers to give advice to breeders 
and to publish information on game 
breeding, so we are inclined to believe 
there are good times coming for Califor- 
nia breeders. 

Trouble in Illinois. 

Members of the Farmers' Protective 
Association, composed of farmers of 
Coal Valley, Hampton and other points 



in Illinois, met last week to take action 
in relation to rabbit shooting at night. 
It was reported that many hunters now 
seek this game along the country high- 
ways, the animals being attracted by the 
dazzling glare from automobile head- 
lights. The hunters frequently kill live 
stock standing close to fences and which 
are not seen, owing to the darkness. It 
is maintained that this method of hunt- 
ing is illegal and a menace to public 
safety. Efforts will be made to have it 
suppressed. 

Farmers are making trouble for Illi- 
nois hunters. Many farms that were 
always open to hunters in the past are 
now barred, while a strict watch is kept 
to see that there is no trespassing. — The 
Sportsmen's Review. 

Trout in New Jersey. 

New Jersey state wardens have com- 
menced the fall distribution of brook 
trout and rainbow trout reared at the 
state fish hatchery at Hackettstown. A 
half-million of these game fish will be 
put in the inland waters of New Jersey 
before the end of the year, while several 
hundred thousand more will be sent out 
next spring. The Fish and Game Com- 
mission is following the policy of using 
only large fish for restocking the streams, 
which proved so successful this past 
year. The trout liberated measures from 
seven to fourteen inches in length. The 
restocking work is under the direction 
of State Protector James M. Stratton. 
Auto trucks of the commission are trans- 
porting the fish from the hatchery ponds 
to points of distribution in north Jersey 
counties. The trout will be shipped by 
train in carload lots to counties south of 
Mercer. The fish are sent out from the 
hatchery in cans of iced water, in which 
they reach their destination in any part 
of the state in prime condition. Reports 
from fisheries in all parts of the state 
where trout were liberated last year in- 
dicate that anglers are delighted with 
the results of modern methods in stock- 
ing streams. The rainbow trout is a 
new variety in New Jersey, but has done 
exceptionally well, where brook trout 



112 



THE GAME BREEDER 



rarely thrived. Another new fish soon 
to be introduced by the commission in 
New Jersey ponds and lakes is the fam- 
ous Chinook, or Pacific coast salmon. 

The Remington .22. 

At some of the game clubs which we 
visited recently we found a lot of .22 
Remington rifles and a good lot of cart- 
ridges. On one occasion some of the 
ladies present joined us in shooting at 
the targets. Such shooting forms a pleas- 
ing diversion and the small rifles are use- 
ful also, when ground vermin is about. 
We know a game keeper who is quite 
handy with a .22 when a rat makes its 
appearance. 

Pheasants and Zeppelins. 

While the protectors of London do not 
seem able to keep the Zeppelins from 
flying over the city, the people in the 
country districts are never at a loss for 
ample warning against the approach of 
these destroyers, according to Mrs. Cad- 
walader Jones, recently returned from 
aboad. 

Mrs. Jones had been staying in Hert- 
fordshire, England, a rolling country 
where the pheasants are plentiful and 
tame. They are now elevated to a sta- 
tion high above the usual plane of a game 
bird, for they can sense a Zeppelin fully 
half an hour before human ingenuity can 
detect one. 

"I do not know how to account for 
their power," she said, "but only a few 
nights before I left a servant came run- 
ning into our house and cried out that 
the pheasants were drumming, and half 
an hour later we looked out to see the 
Zeppelins high overhead." 



Preparedness in Texas. 
Our idea of preparedness is to face a 
hard winter with a smoke-house full of 
hams. — Galveston News. 



Nobody Home. 

A man is boss in his own home when 
the rest of the family are away. — Atchi- 
son Globe. 



Bringing Home the Game. 

By Conservation Commission, N. Y. 

During the open season for any game 
in this State, the actual and lawful taker 
of such game in another State may bring 
it into New York State by any means 
other than by common carrier or parcel 
post, provided he accompanies it. If ship- 
ment by common carrier, except parcel 
post, it must have a shipping permit at- 
tached by the taker at the initial point 
of shipment. The permits are issued 
upon application to the Conservation 
Commission. 

After the close of the season for any 
game, and between the sixteenth of Sep- 
tember and the first day of January fol- 
lowing, the game may still be brought 
into the State if lawfully killed more 
than fifty miles from the border of the 
State, and if accompanied by the taker, 
upon obtaining from the -Conservation 
Commission an importation license. The 
cost of this license is five dollars. If 
such game is to be shipped in by common 
carrier, except • parcel post, a shipping 
permit must be obtained in addition to' 
the importation license. 

Game for which there is no open sea- 
son, as doe deer, moose, elk and caribou, 
may be brought in and possessed, under 
an importation license and shipping per- 
mit, between the sixteenth of September 
and the first of January. 

Thus between the first of January and 
the sixteenth of September no game 
whatever may be imported, except vary- 
ing hares and cotton-tail rabbits, which 
constitute an exception to the general 
rule. Varying hares and rabbits may be 
brought in at any time, without license 
or permit. 

♦ 

MORE CRIME ZONES. 

The fifty-mile legal limit referred to 
above is ridiculous. No one knows 
where the line runs through the farms. 
It is absurd to say that game from one 
side of a field can come to New York, 
but not from the other side. Here we 
have crime zones fully equal to the na- 
tional Migratory Bird Law criminal 
absurdities. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



113 



A DAKOTA GAME FARM. 

By H. J. Jager. 



I have just returned from a trip 
through the Northwest and on my way 
I visited the Pickell Game Farm, con- 
ducted by one of the readers of The 
Game Breeder. I wish you could have 
been with me to see the many fat, sleek 
and happy web-foots tugging their prov- 
ender around the yards and teasing for 
the angle worms which their owner 
turned up for them with a spade, any- 
where. I remained as long as I could 
watching the flocks and listening to the 
greetings of all kinds of wild ducks that 
greeted Mr. Pickell whenever he came 
in sight of the birds. 

There were flocks of mallards, pin- 
tails, gadwalls, widgeons, teal and a few 
deep-water ducks, all hand-reared and 



as tame as kittens. Adjoining the duck 
yards are pheasant yards and pigeon 
yards, swarming with beauties of all 
varieties and sizes. There were some of 
the most beautiful pigeons I have ever 
seen. He has certainly made a great 
success of the game breeding business. 
Many varieties of wild geese must not 
be forgotten. I tried to get him to write 
his experiences for The Game Breeder, 
but he seems to be entirely too modest 
and says he is too. short of time since 
his game breeding has to be a side issue 
with him at present. But I simply can 
not keep still about it and I know you 
and your readers will be interested to 
know about his great success even from 
second-hand information. 



THE HEATH HEN ON MARTHA'S VINEYARD. 

By William Day. 
Superintendent of the Heath Hen Reservation. 



I am in receipt of a very interesting 
and useful book entitled Game Farm- 
ing, for Profit and Pleasure, issued by 
the Hercules Powder Company, which is 
much appreciated. 

. As Superintendent of the State Heath 
Hen Reservation on Martha's Vineyard, 
I thought perhaps some of the readers 
of your valuable paper, The Game 
Breeder, might be interested in a few 
up-to-date facts concerning a bird that 
was almost extinct, the heath hen. To 
Dr. George W. Field, Chairman of the 
Massachusetts Fish and Game Commis- 
sion, should be given the credit of real- 
izing the possibilities of bringing this 
valuable game bird back so that it is 
firmly established on Martha's Vine- 
yard. On May 2, 1907, only 21 of 
these birds were flushed, after a dili- 
gent search was made in places where 
they were most likely to be found. Dr. 
Field then carefully investigated the 
subject, and interested his friends, which 



enabled him to have laws passed for their 
protection. A game warden was ap- 
pointed to patrol the reservation. It is 
of interest to note that this was not the 
first time laws had been passed for their 
protection. Banks History of Martha's 
Vineyard quotes laws passed in 1824 
concerning heath hens by the voters of 
Tisbury. 

In 1907, 635 acres were purchased 
for a reservation ; five stops were con- 
structed, and land was cultivated for 
corn, sunflowers, rye, beardless barley, 
buckwheat and clover. The birds are 
very fond of all of these foods. In 1912 
an additional tract of 1,000 acres was 
leased to enlarge the feeding grounds, 
and give more protection, with the result 
the birds have responded quite readily 
to care and protection. I feel it is a 
very conservative estimate to state that 
there are fully 2,000 birds now. They 
can be found all over the island ; in fact 
have been reported in the trees at Vine- 



114 



THE GAME BREEDER 



yard Haven. It is common to flush 200 
or more in the feeding grounds on the 
reservation. They lie well to a dog, and 
weigh about two pounds, making an ex- 
cellent game bird. 

Now a word regarding vermin. Cats 
and marsh hawks are their chief en- 
emies. During the winter of 1913-14 
twelve cats were killed; in 1914-15 sev- 
enteen were shot, and three have been 
killed to date this fall. Considering the 
fact that we are four miles from any 
village, it shows the extent to which 



these pests travel. We expect to be able 
to keep them down now, having recently 
purchased a cat dog, through the efforts 
of Game Commissioner William C. 
Adams. Large numbers of marsh hawks 
are destroyed annually, the scrub oaks 
seem to attract and keep them here in 
summer, as the marsh hawks are far 
more numerous here than they are on 
the mainland. 

I would extend a cordial invitation to 
any and all bird lovers to pay the reser- 
vation a visit and view the birds. 



THE RING-NECKED PHEASANT. 

By Harold C. Bryant, 
Game Expert, Fish and Game Commission of California. 



[We would respectfully urge the game ex 
California to consider the question of vermi 
numbers. On the game farms and preserves o 
thousands of pheasants are liberated and sho 
vermin of all sorts and the game keepers ar 
the hawks, crows, foxes, snakes and many o 
have seen the keepers kill crows when they w 
when they were taking young pheasants; we h 
recently devoured young pheasants. How would 
publications of the Fish and Game Commissio 
dog" they are decidedly different from those 
able on this account. — Editor.] 

Of interest to everyone are the recent 
attempts to establish foreign game birds 
in the United States. These attempts 
have been so well advertised that the 
names of ring-necked pheasant and Hun- 
garian partridge are familiar to all. In 
reviewing the work accomplished along 
these lines it has been found that the only 
bird which has been successfully estab- 
lished anywhere in the United States is 
the Chinese ring-necked pheasant. 

The ring-necked pheasant in the Orient 
is distributed from western Siberia and 
Mongolia to Korea and eastern China. 
In its native habitat it is largely a bird of 
the mountain districts. It is therefore 
remarkable that this species when trans- 
planted to the Pacific Coast should take 
to the lowlands and become established 
there only. 

The first attempts to introduce this 
bird on the Pacific Coast were made by 



pert of the Fish and Game Commission of 
n and its relation to pheasants liberated in small 
wned by readers of The Game Breeder many 
t every year. A continual warfare is waged on 
e well aware they would have few pheasants if 
Lher vermin were not partially controlled. We 
ere stealing eggs ; we have seen them kill hawks 
ave seen them cut open snakes and take out 
it do to discuss this important question in the 
n? If California pheasants, "lie well to the 
we are familiar with and are especially valu- 

Hon. O. N. Denny in 1880. All but 
twelve cocks and three hens of the first 
shipment died during transportation 
from Shanghai. These few birds were 
liberated twelve miles from Portland. 
The following year ten cocks and eigh- 
teen hens were liberated in the Willa- 
mette Valley. These birds increased so 
rapidly and became so thoroughly estab- 
lished in the State that twelve years 
later, when a. shooting season of two and 
a half months was opened, 50,000 were 
reported as having been killed. 

The success attained in Oregon aroused 
general interest throughout the United 
States and thousands of these pheasants 
have since been liberated. Some have 
been imported, while others have been 
reared on game farms and on private 
preserves. But in spite of continued in- 
terest in the problem of establishing this 
bird, the only places where the ring- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



115 






necked pheasant is to be found at the 
present time in numbers large enough to 
justify an open season are in. the States 
of Oregon and Washington. 

California has spent thousands of dol- 
lars and has planted thousands of ring- 
necked pheasants, yet these birds are 
nowhere abundant enough to warrant 
even a short open season upon them. 
The places where the birds are most 
abundant in this State are in the vicini- 
ties of Yreka, Siskiyou County ; Eureka, 
Humboldt County; Fortuna, Humboldt 
County; Cloverdale, Sonoma County; 
Napa, Napa County; Carmel Valley, 
Monterey County; Snelling, Merced 
County, and Porterville and Lindsey, 
Tulare County. 

Where the birds have become estab- 
lished they seek shelter largely in the 
tules and willows along streams and 
about the margins of lakes. They forage 
in the neighboring open fields, feeding 
upon waste grain, grass-seeds, alfalfa and 
also to a large extent upon insects. 
Great numbers of grasshoppers, cer- 
tain beetles and other injurious insects 
are greedily devoured. It has been re- 
ported that upward of 1200 wireworms 
have been taken out of the crop of a 
ring-necked pheasant, also that two 
pheasants shot at the close of the shoot- 
ing season had in their crops 726 wire- 
worms, 1 acorn, 1 snail, 9 berries and 
3 grains of wheat. 

As a game bird the pheasant ranks 
very high. It is highly ornamental, lies 



well to a dog and is usually to be found 
in the open. Not only does it make ideal 
sport, but it furnishes a valuable addi- 
tion to the table. This bird is in great 
demand by hotels and clubs for use at 
banquets, and the usual price paid is 
$2.50 per bird. Since the ring-necked 
pheasant is easily reared in captivity, 
pheasant raising can be made a profit- 
able business. The recent breakup in 
trade between China and the United 
States because of the sale of American 
ships has limited the usual importation 
of cold storage pheasants, so that the 
market may be expected to improve. 

The state of California has done its 
best to improve game conditions by es- 
tablishing this foreign game bird. 
Thousands of ring-necked pheasants 
have been reared at the state game farm 
at Hayward and distributed to different 
parts of the state. Why the results 
have not been greater is hard to under- 
stand. One reason is apparent, and that 
is that in many localities where the birds 
have been planted people have taken so 
little interest in them that poachers 
have slowly cleaned them out. In addi- 
tion, it seems probable that the state of 
California does not furnish as good food 
and cover as does Oregon, and this may 
be a basic reason why the ring-necked 
pheasant is not more numerous in Cali- 
fornia at the present time. Time alone 
will tell what we are to expect from the 
ring-necked pheasant in this state. 



THE WORK OF LAST YEAR. 

By the Editor. 



In reviewing the progress of game 
breeding and the legislation encouraging 
the new industry we said last January: 
"There were not as many game breeders' 
laws enacted as there will be this year." 
Our prediction has been verified. 

Thirty-two States now permit and en- 
courage the production and sale of all 
or certain species of game. The absurd- 
ity of encouraging only the breeding of 



the more common species and denying 
the breeders assistance to species which 
most need it is becoming more evident 
and the laws, we predict, soon will be 
amended in every State, as they have 
been in some, so as to permit game breed- 
ers to rear and sell all species of game 
under simple regulations. 

The words "in captivity" still are used 
in some statutes, the claim being made 



116 THE GAME BREEDER 

that game on protected areas where .Hotel, an account of which was pub- 
game keepers are employed is under con- lished in The Game Breeder and in. the 
trol and comes within the meaning of Bulletin of the Association, 
the statute. There should be no doubt One of the most important events of 
about this matter, however, since cer- the year was the publication of a hand- 
tain birds when bred wild on game farms somely illustrated booklet on "Game 
and preserves are far better for sport Farming for Profit and Pleasure," by the 
and for the table than birds bred in small Hercules Powder Company, which has a 
enclosures are. We favor the laws department intended to encourage game 
which say "game bred on game farms breeding. This booklet had an enthusi- 
and preserves" to those which say "game astic reception throughout the country 
bred in captivity." and will undoubtedly give a great im- 

The industry has made considerable petus to the new industry, 
progress in some of the States which A bill introduced in New York giving 
have not enacted game breeders' laws the breeders of other States the right to 
and many thousands of quail, grouse, sell their foods in the best market met 
wild turkeys, wild ducks and other game with opposition from some of the old- 
birds and deer are properly looked after time game law protectionists who claimed 
by game breeders who shoot good bags to be opposed to the measure on account 
every season, but unfortunately they of its form and was defeated. Since 
cannot sell and ship birds even for propa- they admit the principle advocated by 
gation. the Game Conservation Society and The 

A game census taken by the game Game Breeder is right, it seems likely 

breeder shows that nearly an hundred that the breeders in other States may 

thousand game birds and deer are now soon be permitted to sell their game in 

owned by the game breeders who. re- New York as breeders in foreign coun- 

ported. This does not include many tries now do. 

thousands of birds and deer which are The U. S. Department of Agriculture 

properly looked after by breeders in issued regulations permitting the im- 
States where their ownership seems to . portation of quail from Mexico which, 

be doubtful. It does not include many in our opinion, are entirely too restric- 

readers of the magazine who are known tive. The requirement of a quarantine 

to have game but who neglected to send for wild trapped birds which are pre- 

in their reports prior to the annual meet- sumed to be healthy seems unreasonable 

ing and dinner of the Game Conserva- and the designation of only one port of 

tion Society. Reports are still comin°- entry on the Mexican border also is un- 

in; the total to date is 96,013. This in- reasonable. The dealers entertain the 

eludes 6,090 deer and 89,923 game birds, opinion that a prejudice exists against 

Massachusetts has the most breeders, but large importations. In spite of the regu- 

the total of game owned by New York . lations many thousands of quail now are 

breeders is larger than that of game being imported, and since they will be 

owned in Massachusetts. There are sold to those who will breed them a big 

more large clubs in New York State and increase in the quail crop will result, 

more small breeders in Massachusetts. The migratory bird law was declared 

The National Association of Audubon unconstitutional by several courts, and 

Societies has created a department of -one case has been taken to the U. S. Su- 

applied ornithology and will encourage preme Court and will soon be decided, 

profitable game breeding and has issued The law intended to protect migratory 

two bulletins on this subject. The birds during the breeding season unfor- 

American Game Protective and Propa- tunately delegated the making of regula- 

gation Association has created a depart- tions to the Department of Agriculture, 

ment on game breeding and preserving which has issued many ridiculous regula- 

and had an interesting and instructive tions intended to meet the whims of 

meeting March 1, at the Waldorf-Astoria prospective criminals, in various parts 



THE GAME BREEDER 



117 



of the country. The regulations are sug- 
gestive of the multitudinous State game 
laws, and their execution will require a 
large force of wardens. If, as it seems 
likely, these regulations are to be multi- 
plied as the State game laws have been, 
we are inclined to think the new law 
should be amended so as to simply de- 
fine a closed season throughout the coun- 
try during the breeding season and there 
should be, of course, a clause in the law 
excepting game breeders and owners of 
game from its provisions. 

A most important event was the wild 
duck dinner of the Game Conservation 
Society at the Hotel Astor, December 14, 
1915. One of the objects of the dinner 
was to bring, together representatives of 
the National Association of Audubon 
Societies, the Game Protective and Prop- 
agation Association and the many game 
breeding clubs, in order that they might 
dine together on such game as it is now 
legal to serve in New York. Since the 
wild turkey long has been extinct in New 
York and was dropped from the laws on 
that account, the Game Conservation So- 
ciety decided to add these birds to the 
menu, a number of birds having been 
donated by members of the society. The 
State game department, however, ruled 



that the turkey could not be served at a 
subscription dinner, because it was a 
relative of New York game birds, and 
the bird was omitted. Mr. Ernest Napier,. 
State Game Commissioner of New Jer- 
sey, who spoke at the dinner, invited the- 
association to dine in New Jersey in the 
future, where, he said, they seldom ar- 
rested anyone, and it seems likely the 
invitation will be accepted if the absurd 
New York law be not amended so as to 
permit the industrious wild turkey breed- 
ers to send this desirable food into New 
York. 

The war continues to put an end to the 
importation of pheasants and partridges 
from Germany and Austria-Hungary, 
and thousands of birds about to be 
shipped were held up. 

The prices for fresh killed game re- 
main up in New York, and it seems 
likely it will be several years before the 
markets are abundantly supplied at rea- 
sonable figures. Tens of thousands of 
eggs were sold last spring by advertisers 
in the magazine, many of whom reported 
they could not fill their orders. Hun- 
dreds of thousands of eggs soon will be 
for sale, but we predict the prices will 
remain up since new bree'ders and clubs 
are starting in many States. 



THE PRAIRIE GROUSE. 

(Seventh Paper.) 
By Dwight W. Huntington. 



From October to April, inclusive, Dr. 
Sylvester I. Judd says, in the bulletin 
referred to in previous papers, the prairie 
hen takes little but vegetable food. This 
element amounts to 85.89 per cent for 
the year. Fruit constitutes 11.79 per 
cent ; leaves, flowers and shoots 25.09 
per cent; seeds 14.87 per cent; grain 
31.06 per cent and miscellaneous mate- 
rial 3.08 per cent. 

Like the bobwhite and the ruffed 
grouse, the prairie hen is fond of rose 
hips, and the abundant roses of the 
prairie yield 11.01 per cent of its food. 



This fact perhaps may be a useful hint 
to anyone who attempts to introduce the 
bird or to improve its environment. The 
other fruit found was of little import- 
ance — merely 0.78 per cent. It was made 
up of domestic cherries, woodbine ber- 
ries, sumac, poison ivy, huckleberries, 
strawberries, partridge berries, mistle- 
toe, wild grapes. The berries of sola- 
tium and symphoricarpus and cornel 
(cornus asperifolia). Of the frugtiv- 
erous habits of the prairie hen Audubon 
writes : "In the western country, at the 
approach of winter, these birds frequent 



118 



THE GAME BREEDER 



the tops of the sumac bushes to feed on 
their seeds, often in such numbers that 
I have seen the bushes bent by their 
weight." 

It is important to note, Dr. Judd says, 
that often when deep snow causes scar- 
city of other supplies the sumac affords 
both the prairie hen and the bob white 
abundant food. As with the insect food, 
further investigation undoubtedly will 
extend the fruit list. 

The prairie hen eats a much smaller 
proportion of seeds, with the exception 
of grain, than the bobwhite, and in this 
respect is less useful than the latter bird. 
It is, however, a better weeder than any 
other grouse, and its services in this 
particular are worthy of consideration. 
As before stated, seeds make 14.87 per 
cent of the annual diet. Of these grass 
seeds form 1.03 per cent; seeds of va- 
rious polygonums, 8.49 per cent, and 
miscellaneous weed seeds 5.35 per cent. 
When the nature of the prairie hen's 
habitat is recalled it seems strange that 
the percentage of grass seeds is so small. 
The bobwhite, in contrast, takes 9.46 per 
cent of grass seed. Like the bobwhite 
and other granivorous birds, the prairie 
hen often eats the seeds of the various 
species of panicums, the paspalums, and 
pigeon grass. 

The seeds of different polygonums, 
or smartweeds, play an important part 
in the economy of the prairie hen. They 
form 8.49 per cent of the food. These 
plants grow profusely where illy drained 
regions of the plains are under water^ for 
a few months in the year. Black bind- 
weed and smartweed with the closely 
related dock are included in the bill of 
fare. 

Other foods, listed by Dr. Judd, are 
ragweed, wild sunflower, coreopsis, cas- 
sia and the hog peanut, prairie mimosa, 
seeds of water willow, the yellow false 
garlic and others of little importance. 

As a grain eater the prairie hen heads 
the native gallinaceous birds. Every- 
body who has gone "chicken" shooting 
knows how closely the bird is associated 
with stubble fields. The stomachs and 
crops examined in the investigation con- 
tained 31.06 per cent of grain. The 



stomach of a grouse, shot in June in 
Nebraska, contained 100 kernels of 
corn and 500 grains of wheat. J. A. 
Loring, formerly of the Biological Sur- 
vey, during December in Nebraska,- 
found prairie hens feeding in wheat 
stubble, about straw stacks, and along 
the edges of corn fields. Dr. Hatch, in 
Birds of Minnesota, writing of their 
granivorous habits says: "The grain 
fields afforded both food and protection 
for them, until the farmers complained 
of them bitterly, but not half so bitterly 
as they did afterwards of the bird de- 
stroyers who ran over their broad acres 
of wheat, oats and corn in the order of 
their ripening." 

Buckwheat, barley, oats and millet 
are relished, but corn appears to be the 
favorite cereal, amounting to 19,45 per 
cent of the annual food. Other grain, 
principally wheat, was in the ratio of 
11.61 per cent. Amos W. Butler re- 
ports that in Indiana, during September, 
fields of ripening buckwheat are favor- 
ite feeding grounds. There is reason 
to believe that sprouting grain is some- 
times injured. Audubon speaks of such 
injury in Kentucky, where the bird was 
extremely abundant. 

The prairie grouse likes mast, though 
naturally it obtains much less than the 
ruffled grouse. It swallows acorns 

whole. 

— ■ — ■♦ 

"And For Me The Game Breeder." 

The Game Breeder, 

Enclosed you will please find my check 
for $1.00 for which you may mail me 
your very valuable and interesting maga- 
zine. I am sure that I have been missing 
a rare treat by not having seen it before 
but this is the first copy I have had the 
pleasure of reading and me for The 
Game Breeder from now on. 

Compliments of the season, 

(Signed) Joe V. Prochaska. 

Arizona. 

> 

Little Sophie — Father, what is exec- 
utive ability? 

Prof. Broadhead — The faculty of 
earning your bread by the work of other 
people. — Credit Lost. 



THE GAME BREEDER 119 

THE WILD DUCK DINNER. 
Held at the Hotel Astor, N. Y., December 14, 1915. 

The Wild Duck Dinner of The Game discovered an ancient law protecting 

Conservation Society was the most im- birds related to New York birds. It 

portant meeting of sportsmen and nat- seems, the turkey is a relative of the quail 

uralists held for many years. The state and a game warden might, of course, 

game departments of several states make a mistake or at all events there is 

were represented by state officers. The some trouble about the relationship and 

American Game Protective Association those who rear wild turkeys must for the 

designated Mr. E. A. Quarles, chief of present caution their customers to eat 

its newly formed game breeding depart- them in New Jersey or some other state 

ment, to represent it. Professor T. Gil- where there is more freedom than there 

bert Pearson, the great leader in conser- is in New York. The Game Conserva- 

vation work spoke for the National As- tion Society standing strongly for obedi- 

sociation of Audubon Societies. Mr, ence to the laws no matter how absurd 

Clyde B. Terrell, of Wisconsin; Mr. R. they may be promptly notified the State 

A. Chiles, of Kentucky; Mr. Ernest Department that the wild turkeys would 

Napier, Chairman of the New Jersey not be served and thanked the State 

Game Commission and Hon. Harrison officers for calling attention to the ab- 

Glore, of Brooklyn, N. Y., were the surdity. Turkeys not quite so wild and 

other speakers. . not nearly so good as those donated for 

Over twenty clubs were represented by the dinner were substituted and filled the 

delegations, some of which had special gap made in the following : 

tables; there were many owners of MFNTT 
country places and preserves which now 

have an abundance of game. Many Cape Cod Oysters half shell 

members of the Camp Fire Club and V elout % ? f Wl l? P" ck ' S ^' 1 Hl ! b t r T t 

other similar organizations, which are 0h Y,es, Celery, Radishes, Salted Nuts 

more or less concerned about the game Flk ; ts of Kmgfish, a la Meuniere 

on public lands and waters, were well ^ Bermuda Potatoes, Persillade 

represented. It was a big, harmonious Escalopes of Venison, sauce Poivrade 

and enthusiastic meeting. Brussels Sprouts Puree of Chestnuts 

The object of the meeting was to bring . , r ^^ ™ of lurk ey 

together all of the important interests at with fresh Mushrooms en Coquil es 

a harmonious game dinner given to eel- *?*!* Mallard Duck > Currant Jelly 

cbrate the success of the more game Wlld Rlc ^ Salad Moderne 

movement advocated by The Game Con- ^ anc y ^ es 

servation Society, The Game Breeder, Assorted Cakes 

and now ably supported by the game ^ afe Woir 

breeding departments and committees During the dinner a choir which had 

of the national associations represented, been engaged to offset the sermons sang 

Venison and wild ducks were the only good music. 

game served. An abundance of wild The President of the Game Conserva- 

turkeys had been secured for the occa- tion Society, said a few words of wel- 

sion from game farms and preserves come and expressed the hope that in the 

where now they are raised abundantly, future those present would have a series 

Some were donated for the occasion by of game dinners every season that he 

game breeding members of The Game might attend as a private prepared to do 

Conservation Society in three states; full justice to the game. He said the game 

but the turkeys were not served at the rapidly was becoming plentiful in the 

dinner pursuant to a direction from the states which had enacted game breeder's 

state game officer of New York, who laws and that members of the society 



120 THE GAME BREEDER 

were prepared to furnish all the game Hubert K. Job had been placed at the 
for a series of dinners and there was no head of this department. He had ex- 
danger of extinction; the way to make pected to exhibit his moving pictures 
game abundant was to eat it in abund- but they had been shown in New Orleans 
ance, paradoxical as the statement might and were lost on their way north. He 
seem. It would be idle and repetitious, had been unable to locate them, 
the speaker said, for him to discuss the Mr. Clyde B. Terrell, an expert on 
objects of the Conservation Society this the natural foods of wild ducks and their 
evening; all present were aware that it planting, discussed this subject. He re- 
favored "more game and fewer game ferred briefly to the numerous plants and 
laws" and that it proposed quickly to said it was important not only to have 
make America the biggest game produc- suitable foods but also suitable covers in 
ing country in the world. Announcing places where wild ducks were propa- 
the game census taken by the publication gated or where we sought to attract 
of the Society, the speaker said it had them. He cited instances where canvas- 
been difficult to get full returns but those backs, red-heads, teal and other fowl had 
reporting had nearly an hundred thou- been restored to waters which they had 
sand deer and game birds and, the ratio ceased to frequent and where they had 
of increase being geometrical, the num- been induced to visit waters, where they 
ber would be a million or more within a had been unknown, simply by planting 
year. the suitable food. Wild fowl, like other 

Introducing Mr. A. A. Hill as toast- animals, including man, had a tendency 

master, Mr. Huntington said he was a to gather in places where there was an 

very busy man, the editor of two maga- abundance of good things to eat. He 

zines and an arctic explorer, but he invited,, those present to ask any ques- 

found time to advise the society and its tions they might desire to ask and a short 

publication. Sportsmen were much in- and interesting discussion followed, 

debted-to Mr. Hill. Mr. E. A. Quarles spoke about the 

Aftter telling a good little story about, great work being done by the American 
"more peach brandy," which illustrated Game Protective Association which he 
the "more game" idea, Mr. Hill said that represented. Within the year, he said it 
Professor Pearson, the first speaker, had had created a department on. game breed- 
informed him he could deliver his ser- ing and it had issued a bulletin contain- 
mon better if the choir would sing his ing much information about breeding 
favorite hymn before the discourse. The quail in captivity and about other matters 
choir promptly sang, "A Hot Time in of interest to game breeders. " He re- 
the Old Town To-night," and the Pro- ferred at length to the importance of 
fes.sor.with a smile of approval, but dis- game refuges where no shooting is per- 
claiming that he had called for the hymn, mitted and where game birds can breed 
proceeded to speak well and earnestly, in quiet and said his association took an 
as he always does when discussing the especial interest in this branch of con- 
conservation of birds. He said Mr. Hun- servation work. 

tington had told him a year or two ago He was gratified to observe that all 

that it would not be long before they those interested in game conservation and 

would dine on game at a public dinner, game breeding were working in harmony 

and that he was surprised and gratified and he felt sure that dinners similar to 

at the rapidity with which the prediction the one held tonight, would help the 

had been verified ; he had, as he had no movement for "more game" much, 

doubt the others had, enjoyed eating the Mr. R. A. Chiles of Kentucky said he 

evidence. He referred particularly to had travelled a long distance to attend 

the new department of applied ornithol- the dinner, and that he had come from a 

qgy created by his association, in order state where" they had more game laws 

to encourage game, breeding and said Dr. than game but he felt sure!, the proper 



THE GAME BREEDER 



121 



remedy for such conditions was coming 
their way. He referred to an unfortunate 
recent occurrence in his state, when a 
large lot of pheasants had been reared 
and were ready for the guns and the 
table, the state officers discovered it was 
illegal for the owner to shoot and eat 
his game. A poor way to encourage in- 
dustry surely ! Mr. Chiles told a lot of 
excellent stories which delighted his 
audience, and he made a bang-up good 
after-dinner speech — just what was 
needed after the more serious and in- 
structive sermons which had been de- 
livered. The speaker was hardly seated 
when the choir sweetly sang, "My Old 
Kentucky Home," and the diners rising 
to join in the chorus drank the health 
of the orator and hailed him with en- 
thusiasm. 

Mr. Ernest Napier, chairman of the 
New Jersey Game Commission made a 
short but most clever and excellent after- 
dinner address. He referred to the diffi- 
culties imposed on game protectors in a 
small state situated between the great 
metropolis, New York, and a good sized 
hamlet in Pennsylvania. He told about 
the remarkable work being carried on at 
one of the best state game farms in the 
country, and, in conclusion, referring to 
the well known fact that they seldom 
arrested anybody in New Jersey, he in- 
vited the Game Conservation Society to 
give its wild turkey dinners in his state 
where he assured them the diners would 
not be molested, promising to be on hand 
to see that all went well. This proposi- 
tion was hailed with delight. 

Mr. Harrison Glore said he was 
pleased to observe the harmonious gath- 
ering and to hear Professor Pearson tell 
about his experiences with the wild fowl 
at the Delta Club. He said at one time 
he had represented the feather dealers, 
referred to the fact that the ostrich was 
reared on account of the commercial 
value of its feathers and said no doubt 
other birds could be handled by breeders 
profitably on account of the value of the 
feathers as well as on account of their 
food value and their value to sportsmen 
as objects of health-giving pursuit. He 
hoped that all interested in birds might 



work together in harmony for better 
legislation and he could see that much 
good would come from the meeting to- 
night. 

Mr. J. W. Titcomb, the State Game 
officer of Vermont, who had promised to 
speak about game breeding in his state 
and the desirability of having the New 
York market opened to Vermont breed- 
ers, arrived just after the meeting ad- 
journed. He had been detained at Stam- 
ford, Connecticut for some hours on ac- 
count of the blizzard which stopped the 
trains. 

A number of New England sportsmen 
also, were belated and arrived during 
the night, much disappointed at not be- 
ing able to attend the dinner for which 
they had subscribed. Two, who had 
contributed wild ducks, were prevented 
from seeing them well served. 

The blizzard prevented many members 
of the New England clubs and many 
preserve owners, who had secured seats 
for the wild duck dinner given by the 
Game Conservation Society, from at- 
tending. 

Mr. Adams, one of the Massachusetts 
commissioners, arrived after the dinner 
was served, but writes that he enjoyed 
the meeting. Dr. Field, chairman of the 
Massachusetts Commission, did not reach 
the hotel until the morning after the din- 
ner. Telegrams from members of the 
Fishers Island Club and other New Eng- 
land sportsmen came during the evening 
expressing their regrets at being belated. 
Telegrams also came from Buffalo, Balti- 
more and other cities from sportsmen 
who subscribed for the dinner, but could 

not come. 

■ . »-^ 

"Waiter, is this veal?" 

"Yes, sir." 

"Well, I'll bet he gave his family lots 
of trouble. He certainly was a young 
tough." — Judge. 

♦ 

Mother — Why didn't you take your 
bath? 

Tommy — I thought there might be 
some mines in the water. — New York- 
Sun. 



122 



THE GAME BREEDER 




35eiB2^C8E3B5^«£r- 



DUCK POND AT THE CALIFORNIA GAME FARM. 
There are 32 Mallards; 20 Shovellers; 11 Pintails; 2 Cinnamon Teal; 2 Tree Ducks; 1 Widgeon; 

2 White-fronted Geese; 1 Snow Goose. 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 



A fine new pond has been constructed 
for wild fowl at the State Game Farm at 
Hayward, and this now affords a home 
for more than two hundred and fifty 
ducks and geese. The following species 
are represented: mallard, gadwall, bald- 
pate, green-winged teal, cinnamon teal, 
Bikal teal, shoveller, pin-tail, mandarin, 
red-head, lesser scaup, ruddy, lesser 
snow goose, white-fronted goose, ful- 
vous tree-duck, and mud-hen. 

Two methods were used this past 
spring and summer to stock the pond. 
Eggs were collected in the Alvarado 
marshes and hatched at the Game Farm, 
and downy young and floppers were cap- 
tured in the same locality and near Men- 
dota in Fresno County. 

Another year experiments will be car- 
ried on to determine the feasibility of 
breeding wild ducks and geese in cap- 
tivity. This past year a number of mal- 
lards were reared and a setting of eggs 
was obtained from a cinnamon teal which 
had been kept in captivity for more than 
a year. 

Only a few hundred ring-necked 
pheasants were reared this year. These 
are being planted in large lots in locali- 
ties where pheasants have already made 
a start. This should aid the birds to 
increase in those localities where it has 



been demonstrated that favorable con- 
ditions exist. 

Success has attended the efforts to rear 
California valley quail. Over three hun- 
dred birds hatched in incubators and 
reared in brooders are now nearing ma- 
turity. A few small plants will be made. 
The experiments have clearly demon- 
strated that the valley quail is not a dif- 
ficult bird to rear in captivity. 

Maggots. 

In a good booklet on Pheasant Farm- 
ing by Gene M. Simpson, Superintendent 
of the Oregon State Game Farm, the 
writer advises the use of the larvae of 
the common blue fly (maggots). "When 
this food is used," he says, "nothing else 
need be fed, except greens occasionally, 
until the birds are a month old." 

Mr. Simpson was a successful com- 
mercial breeder of pheasants before he 
became the Superintendent of the State 
Game Farm, and has reared many pheas- 
ants. 

We were of the opinion, however, that 
the use of maggots had been almost, if 
not entirely abandoned by most of the 
successful gamp keepers. Where grass- 
hoppers and other insects are plentiful 
as they should be in the rearing field, 
the pursuit of insects is excellent exer- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



123 



cise for the young birds which, of course, 
they do not get when fed on maggots. 
The insects are a natural food and are, 
we believe, all the animal food required. 
We shall be glad to have some letters 
from game keepers on this subject. 

Blackhead in Turkeys. 

Mrs. F. L. S., Ind., writes: "Please 
tell me what to do for my turkeys that 
are dying with some form of bowel 
trouble. The droppings are of a green- 
ish yellow. The edge of the mouth turns 
red while the head turns black and they 
rattle in the throat. My old gobbler died 
of this trouble and in about four weeks 
I lost my large turkey hen that had 
hatched the turkeys. They have full 
range." 

The trouble is known as black-head, 
or in other words severe indigestion, 
caused by eating too freely on fat-pro- 
ducing foods. If you will take the dis- 
ease while it is in its first stages you can 
cure it, but if you allow the turkeys to 
linger with the disease three or four days 
nothing will cure them. Give one tea- 
spoonful flours of sulphur, in about one 
hour give three teaspoonfuls of pow- 
dered charcoal. Have your tinner to 
make you a long necked funnel about 
the size of a lead pencil and of sufficient 
length to pass below the wind pipe. One 
about the length of an ordinary lead 
pencil will be about right. Dissolve one 
tablespoonful Epsom salts in two ounces 
of soft water and give three hours after 
you have given the charcoal. This will 
clean out the bowels and open the way 
for the liver to have free action. Con- 
tinue to give three teaspoonfuls of char- 
coal three times daily until the fowl is 
noticed to appear more active, then feed 
a light feed of wheat bread and provide 
water. If the fowl again appears slug- 
gish repeat the treatment. You can save 
nine out of ten with this method of 
treatment. — See Bulletin 141, Rhode 
Island State College Agr. Exp. Sta. 

A Deer Trouble. 

Referring to the article in The Game 
Breeder for November — my deer have 
been afflicted with what seems to be 



black tongue. The tongue and lips seem 
paralyzed and they are unable to eat. 
I give medicine by cutting an apple and 
placing it in the cut. I then place the 
apple well back in the mouth. The deer 
are very fond of apples and when sick 
seem to enjoy eating them. Most of 
my deer died when attacked with this 
trouble. 

Kansas. H. D. CoLtiNS. 

Lead Poisoned Mallards. 

Mr. W. L. Finley, writing for the 
Oregon Sportsman, says : 

"Two or three years ago my attention 
was called to some sick Mallards that 
were found on Government Island in the 
Columbia River. Two males were found 
swimming about on the lake, but they 
could not fly. Two dead birds were also 
picked up and examined. In the stom- 
ach of one of the dead Mallards we 
found forty-two shot. Some of these 
were the size of No. 6 shot ; others were 
as small as dust shot, showing that they 
had been worn down by the action of 
the stomach. For many years there has 
been a great deal of duck shooting along 
the Columbia. There is naturally a great 
deal of shot scattered about. In feeding ' 
along the mud bottoms of the ponds, 
ducks eat these shot, mistaking them 
for seeds or gravel. Mr. J. H. Boyles, 
of Tacoma, records the same thing on 
the flats surrounding the mouth of the 
Nisqually River where it empties into 
Puget Sound near Olympia. He exam- 
ined the stomachs of two Mallards and 
found one contained nineteen shot and 
the other twenty-seven. It seemed to 
be purely a case of lead poisoning. The 
Mallard seems to be the only species 
that is affected." 

We believe there are other records of 
birds being killed by eating shot. Prob- 
ably some of our readers can contribute 
something aout this. On a well-regulat- 
ed duck preserve or "shoot" the birds 
are not shot on or near the pond where 
they are fed, and there is no clanger of 

their being poisoned. 

• 

Advertisements in The Game Breeder 
produce results. 



124 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Dynamite to Stop Prairie Fires. 

Sounds queer, doesn't it, to suggest 
dynamite to stop a fire? However, it 
has been successfully used to blast 
ridges of fresh earth in the path of for- 
est fires and for years, it has been used 
to blast down buildings in the path of 
conflagrations in cities. 

Mr. Gove, the Massachusetts blaster, 
suggests an extension of the idea. He 
has used dynamite to stop a prairie fire. 
This is even simpler than stopping for- 
est fires or conflagrations in cities be- 
cause it is only necessary to blast a few 
feet of shallow ditch across the path of 
the fire. The fire will not ordinarily 
cross the fresh moist earth thus thrown 
up and dies out for want of fuel to 
feed on. — Du Pont Magazine. 



Will a Dog Run From a Rabbit? 

Will a dog run from a rabbbit? "Of- 
fice Appliances," in describing the trip 
of the Stationers' Convention through 
Glacier Park, says that several observers 
testified that they saw a rabbit chase a 
dog from its sojourning-ground in the 
park. Other members of the Convention 
derided the story, saying that the "rab- 
bit" was one of those pretty black and 
white animals that know well how to 
make themselves shunned. The original 
observers return to the attack by making 
affidavits that the rabbit was a real one, 
and by submitting a photograph of them- 
selves as men unlikely to prevaricate 
about a matter that did not concern busi- 
ness ! — Outlook. 

We once observed in a small garden 
in the rear of the studio of an artist 
friend, a young pointer which evidently 
was having some fun with a tame rab- 
bit. The dog pointed the rabbit as it 
sat behind a shrub and when the rabbit 
hopped away to another part of the 
garden the dog ran about apparently 
hunting it, casting to right and left, al- 
though I was quite sure he knew where 
the rabbit was all the time. From time 
to time he discovered his game and 
drew up carefully to a point. When the 
rabbit moved away the dog repeated his 
amusing search for it and again located 



it and pointed. At length, much to my 
surprise, the rabbit, (evidently having 
become tired of the game) sprang at the 
dog and appeared to bite it. Where- 
upon the pointer retired from the hunt, 
and coming to the porch where we were 
seated he dropped as if ordered to 
"charge" with his nose on his forelegs, 
and it seemed as if he was a little 
ashamed of his defeat. 



Wild Ducks for the Market. 

Mr. W. L. Finley, State Biologist, of 
Oregon, says: 

"The Mallard is one of the easiest 
ducks raised in captivity. It is not at all 
difficult to domesticate. It is surprising 
that farmers do' not raise more of these 
birds from a business standpoint. They 
not only bring a good price as decoys, 
but they always demand a good price 
for table use. Since the sale of ducks 
in the wild state was prohibited in Ore- 
gon, there is no reason why the demand 
cannot be partly supplied by wild ducks 
raised in captivity. The Oregon law 
permits this to be done by licensed 
breeders and sold when they are tagged 
under the authority of the Fish and 
Game Commission. A fat wheat-fed 
Mallard is a fit article for any table. The 
proof is in the eating." 

There is no reason why the Oregon 
market should not be fully supplied with 
wild ducks from game farms and 
"shoots." Oregon can send ducks to the 
best market — New York market — and 
get the best prices, when such industry 
is no longer criminal. 



More Dinners. 

Next winter The Game Conservation 
Society hopes there will be more game 
dinners. The president of the society 
expressed the hope that in the future 
they might be given jointly by the asso- 
ciations interested in making America 
a big game producing country. Mem- 
bers of The Game Conservation Society 
in many states can supply all the game 
needed for such dinners all duly identi- 
fied as produced by members of the 



THE GAME BREEDER 



125 



society. The game census, taken by 
The Game Breeder, indicates that over 
one hundred thousand game birds and 
deer are now owned by game breeders. 
Since the ratio of increase is geometrical 
when game is properly looked after, it 
safely can be said there will be over a 
million birds and deer by the time the 
next dinner is announced. We hope 
there will be a series of dinners instead 
of one.' Having "more game" we are 
sure it will be possible to much enlarge 
the list of invitations and that places may 
be set for all who have expressed a de- 
sire to attend. We hope the laws may be 
amended so as to encourage those who 
are breeding wild turkeys, quail and 
other game suitable for dinners. All 
naturalists favor the profitable produc- 
tion of game. The arresting of those 
who produce and serve game is a poor 
way to encourage production. 



James Edgar, game keeper for the 
Carrolls Island Club, writes that he has 
good luck with his wild ducks and that 
he had a fine lot of pheasants but lost 
a big lot of them during a storm. "All 
my coops," he says, "was floating like 
those in the picture you published re- 
cently in The Game Breeder. I picked 
up 925 pheasants, drowned. If it had 
not been for the flood I would have had a 
good season. My birds were about full 
grown and a picture of health and I have 
let the people of Maryland see that 
pheasants can be reared in that State." 



^ Malformed Deer Horns. 

The enclosed photograph is one of 
four malformed horns that have been 
mounted by F. D. Hoyt in the last three 
years. All of the four deer came from 
one district about four miles square and 
within twenty-five miles of the city of 
Oakland, Cal. 

All of the bucks were castrated, but 
whether this has anything to do with 
the malformation or how they became in 
that condition I leave it to breeders of 
big game and men who have studied the 
deer at close range to discuss. This deer 
with the freak head was killed by 




Malformed Horns. 

"Hooks" Rose, of Niles, Cal., so called 
from the fact that he has no hands, both 
being off at the wrists, and he handles a 
rifle with hooks strapped onto the stumps. 
The horns are in the velvet, the most 
symmetrical of any that have come under, 
my observation, with the main horn 
about eighteen inches long, with four- 
inch forks. The eye guards come out 
regular ' and curve back over the main 
horn touching the ears. The base of the 
horns are fifteen and sixteen and a half 
inches in circumference, and form an 
almost perfect hood of bone over the 
top of the head, while from their base 
to the fork, 202 small points from five- 
eighths to one and one-half inches long 
stick out in all directions. 

California. Fred D. Hoyt. 



It seems a pity that the National Gov- 
ernment should attempt to imitate some 
of the State game law nonsense. It has 
been proven beyond a reasonable doubt 
that the game cannot be made plentiful 
simply by enacting legal restrictions. 



Subscribe for The Game Breeder. 
Our slogan is "More Game and Fewer 
Game Laws." 



126 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T*?f Game Breeder 

Published Monthly 

_| 

Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 

NEW Y0ktC, JANUARY, 1916 



TERMS : 

10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, $1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc., 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R Peixotto, Treasurer, 

J C. Huntington, Secretary. 
Telephone, Beekman 36S5. 

TEMPORA MUTANTUR. 

Having hunted the bison, mounted on 
a swift cavalry mount and at other times 
when using Indian ponies taken from the 
Sioux; having hunted the swift antelope 
on the plains of Colorado with a pack of 
equally swift dogs, and stalked these ani- 
mals on the hills and prairies of Mon- 
tana; having ridden on a wagonload of 
quail and having often used a wagon to 
transfer the prairie grouse and wild fowl 
taken in a few days good shooting, we 
are prepared to admit when we revisit 
our old shooting grounds that the "Times 
have changed." 

No longer can we all be destroyers, 
even if we enact laws limiting the bag 
to only a very few birds per season. Na- 
ture's balance surely will be and remain 
upset if the increasing throng of sports- 
men persists in being shooters only and 
insists upon preventing the breeders of 
game from increasing its numbers. 

The time approaches when legislatures 
will meet again. When bills galore will 
be introduced shortening the seasons and 
the hours of the day when it is legal to 
shoot and limiting the bag and making 
closed seasons in entire states for terms 
of years. Young lawyers soon will ap- 
pear before legislative committees on 
fish and game and will recite their little 
pieces beginning "Where are the buffa- 
loes," and "Where are the wild pigeons," 



which have been used in legislative work 
for the last half century. The plea will 
be made to give the game remaining a 
chance to survive, which means if any 
attention be paid to natural laws that 
field sports must be prohibited. We have 
often pointed out shooting is a disastrous 
check to the increase of any species of 
game birds which cannot be tolerated to 
any extent without the result being ex- 
tinction, unless some of us look after 
the game and increase its numbers. 

So long as certain funds are available 
for the "Where are the buffalo" etc., 
legislative campaigns and many young 
lawyers can be found eager to make rep- 
utations in department work we have 
very little hope that the number of laws 
will be reduced; or that the number of 
game birds will be increased, excepting 
by game breeders who are not prevented 
by laws from keeping the game plentiful 
and profitable on the areas used for 
propagation. All we ask is that when 
the new prohibitions of sport are enacted 
that they be not applied to those who 
produce and shoot game in abundance 
every year. 

We know where there are enough, 
bison to fully restock, in short order, all 
of the fields whose owners may want 
"buffaloes." We are well aware, how- 
ever, these animals cannot be restored to 
the gardens and grain fields or even on 
the pastures which now occur where 
formerly we shot the bison in good num- 
bers. We are aware that many lakes 
and ponds where we made our best bags 
of wild fowl have been drained. We 
have observed vast prairies planted with 
wheat where we once shot thousands of 
grouse, but where not a grouse could 
survive to-day because of the loss of the 
natural covers and the winter foods 
which have been destroyed absolutely. 

Truly the times have changed and we 
must change with them. 



THE TROUBLE IN NEW JERSEY. 

One of the most important speeches 
at the Wild Duck Dinner of The Game 
Conservation Society was made by Mr. 
Ernest W. Napier, Chairman of the New 



THE GAME BREEDER 



127 



Jersey State Game Commission. In 
pointing out that they seldom made ar- 
rests in his state he invited the society 
to hold its next banquet in New Jersey 
and said the members could eat wild tur- 
keys produced by the industry of breed- 
ers in safety, promising again to attend 
the dinner. 

We had long known that New Jersey 
had a capable game commission and an 
able and popular chairman. The trouble 
in New Jersey, as in some other states, 
is not with the game officers sworn to 
do their duty, but with the "fool laws" 
they are obliged to execute. 

New Jersey is especially afflicted with 
the old fashioned, rotten moiety system 
which encourages informers to seek their 
share of the ridiculously high fines 
which seem to have been provided for 
their benefit. 

Mr. Napier was a popular figure at 
the dinner where he met many old 
friends and made some new ones. 



Correspondence. 

I wish to again congratulate you on 
the great success of your banquet and 
meeting on Tuesday night. While I did 
not arrive in time to break bread with 
you, I did hear all of the discussion "and 
considered it a very valuable contribu- 
tion to the cause. 

If we in Massachusetts can be of any 
help to you in carrying on the work, 
please command us. 

With best wishes for your continued 
prosperity, I am, Very truly yours, 
William C. Adams. 

Game Commissioner Massachusetts. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

During 1912 I bought a number of 
wood ducks together with some widgeons 
and pin-tails, and put them into a large 
pond on my father's place in New Jer- 
sey. They were bought merely as orna- 
mental water fowl and with no intention 
of selling. A few mallards, which we 
already had there, we ate during the 
game season. We have now raised so 
many mallards that it would seem best 



to sell them, and we applied for a game 
breeder's license, which we expect to re- 
ceive shortly. On a recent reading of 
the game law of New Jersey we get the 
impression that to have had this breeding 
stock in our possession without a license 
was illegal, even though we had no inten- 
tion of selling. Also, inasmuch as it 
seems to be illegal to kill or to sell wood 
ducks at any time, we also get the im- 
pression that it is illegal to have wood 
ducks in our possession, even though we 
had a breeder's license. 

If this is so, we want to dispose of 
our wood ducks, and as we cannot kill 
them or sell them in the State, or trans- 
port them out of the State, and as they 
are pinioned so that we cannot let them 
fly away, we would like to inquire what 
one can do with such creatures if it is 
against the law to possess them. 

I should also particularly like to know 
whether it is illegal to possess out of 
season fowl which are never in season, 
such as wood ducks owned purely for 
ornamental purposes. We cannot pre- 
vent their increasing by themselves, and 
if we do not help them by hatching their 
eggs under chickens the rats and turtles 
destroy the young. 

We have also a couple of swans in the 
pond, but I presume that is nothing to 
worry about in their case. 

If you can tell me what we should do 
in the matter in order to comply with the 
law, I should very much appreciate it. 

A. C. F. 

New York. 

We are pleased to observe there has been 
"a revolution of thought and a revival of com- 
mon sense," since the dean of sportsmen, in 
another letter to The Game Breeder, men- 
tioned this important matter. We believe it 
is now safe to let the wood ducks live and 
swim about and breed. We hope it will not 
be long before you can shoot and eat these 
delicious food birds and sell some of them, if 
you wish to do so, to help pay the food bill. 

A few years ago we would have advised 
you to put the wood-ducks in the furnace 
some dark, stormy night, when no game 
wardens were out, and to destroy the evidence 
of your crime. The effect of the game laws 
was then to "protect the game off the face of 
the earth," as the eminent naturalist, Dr. 
Shufeldt. pointed out in a letter which we pub- 
lished. — Editor. 



128 



THE GAME BREEDER 



The Lost Game. 

How dear to my heart is the quail on the toast ; when fond recollec- 
tion presents it to view. The roast grouse, the woodcock, the teal and 
the curlew, and all the loved game which my infancy knew. Walt Mason 
should know since he lives in the land where prairie grouse nourished; 
where wild ducks were at hand for all who would shoot them and pluck 
them and eat them, but where now, alas ! there is nothing but sand with 
some pastures and wheat fields, corn and green truck; but where are the 
antelope, bison and buck deer which once were so plentiful ? Any sports- 
man by chance, fond of an outing or shooting romance could fill up his 
larder and give the plump quail to a friend, if he wished to, without 
going to jail. Game laws in abundance have been placed in the books: 
little game they preserved for our foxes and rooks. ;!• 



Visitor — How much rent do you pay Angler — I'll give you 50 cents for 

for this dump ? those bass ! 

Subbubs — I own it! Boy — I git a dollar fer lettin' city 

Visitor—Ah, I knew you were too fellers hold a string like that while bein' 

sensible to rent such a place ! photographed ! 



WILD COTTON-TAIL RABBITS 

WILLIAM A. LUCAS, Naturalist, WOODHAVEN, L. I., N. Y. 

I offer for immediate delivery 3000 Northern Cotton-Tail Rabbits. Legal 
animals for restocking State Game Refuges and Game Preserves. 

I guarantee rabbits to be in prime condition. Live arrival guaranteed. 
Order now for sure delivery, Correspondence invited. 

I offer also a fine lot of Ring-Necked Pheasants of prime quality for 
breeding purposes; Bob- White Quail ; Wild Turkeys ; Reeves Pheasants ; 
Golden Pheasants ; Lady Amherst Pheasants ; China Ring-Necked Pheasants 
and Mongolian cross breeds. I also carry a full line of ornamental Land and 
Water Fowl. Order now for sure delivery. 

"Grey Wild Mallard Ducks a Specialty" 

Although my prices are higher than those of some competitors, I, however, 
deliver nothing that is not of prime quality, my expenses are therefore high, 
but my buyers have certain and good results. 



WILLIAM A. LUCAS 



WOODHAVEN, L I., NEW YORK 



THE GAME BREEDER 



129 



Our business is 
making guns. 




For over 50 years we 
have made big guns, 
little guns, good guns — 
The "OLD RELIABLE" 
Parker Guns. 




Send for catalogue and 20 bore booklet. FREE. 

PARKER BROS, Meriden, Conn. SiV^TS. 



Our Wild Fowl and Waders 

A PRACTICAL BOOK ON DUCK BREEDING 
PRICE, $1.50 

THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, New York City 



O^A-IRIBO PEOTIE" 

IP aljem/b e cL 

SPECIAL DEER FEED 




^^ 



^ 



SEDUCE YOURFEED BILL 

WITH 



One of our Customers writes us: 

Eldred, New York, October 26th, 1915. 

Sugar Land Feed Co. , 

445 West 45 th Street, 

New York City. 

Gentlemen: — I am pleased to state that your Carbo 

Protin, special deer feed, gave me extreme satisfaction. 

The deer like it very much and they look splendid, much 

better than when fed with oats and corn, which is too heavy. 

Yours very truly, 

GUIDO BISCHOF, 
Eldred Deer Park, Sullivan Co., N. Y. 

We deliver even small quantities for the 

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Sugar Land Feed Co. of New York, Inc. 

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FEEDS BEST, COSTS LESS 



^ 



130 



THE GAME BREEDER 



STONY LONESOME GAME PARM 

Mallard Ducks and 
Mongolian Pheasants 

We offer for immediate delivery (limited number) of 

Mallard Ducks and Mongolian Pheasants 

and will take orders for eggs, delivery in the spring. 

- — ADDRESS 

129 Front Street, New York City, 

or JOHN FOSTER, West Hartland, Connecticut 



Ringnecks, 
Mongolians and 

Mallards 



Special attention given to selecting 

suitable brood stock for 

our customers 



Egg orders accepted for 
spring delivery 



RIVER LAWN FARM 

Ralph H, Sidway 

210 Franklin St., Buffalo, N. Y. 



NOW IS THE TIME 

If you expect to have fertile eggs next Spring, 
to buy your Birds; don't wait until midwinter or 
next spring; you will be disappointed. 

We Offer For Immediate Delivery. 

Silver, Goldens, Ringnecks, Lady Amhursts, 
Reeves, Elliotts, Mongoiians, Swinhoes.Versicolors, 
Impeyans, Manchurian Eared and Melanotus 
Pheasants. We are now booking orders for eggs 
for Spring and Summer delivery of any of the above 
varieties. We quote Ringneck eggs $3.50 per 
dozen, $25.00 per hundred ; Green head mallard 
eggs $3.50 per dozen, $25.00 per hundred. We also 
otter for sale Single Comb Buff and Blue Orping- 
tons, Rhode Island Reds, Japanese Silkies and 
Longtails, Wild Turkeys, Blue, White Japanned and 
Specifier Peafowls, as well as the following Ducks : 
Greenhead and black mallard, pintail, redhead, 
gadwall, wood, mandarin and Formosan teal, 
shovelers, baldpate and Blue Bill and green wing 
teal. .,'-.., 

WANTED 

White Peahens. In Pheasants, any of the 
tragopans, firebacks, cheer, sommering Elliotts, 
white crested Kalij, Peacocks. Anderson's Lineatus. 
Also Garganey and ring teal. In writing quote 
number, sex and lowest cash price. 

Send 30 cents in stamps for our new 1916 color- 
type catalogue of pheasants and rearing of pheas- 
ants. If you do not like it return in 48 hours after 
receiving, and your money refunded ; and if you 
make a purchase of us to the amount of $5.00 you 
can deduct price of catalogue. 

CHILES <& CO. 



Mount Sterling:, 



Kentucky 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



131 



Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Hungarian Partridges 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders 
for these birds and for years I have filled 
practically all of the large State orders for both 
Partridges and Pheasants. 




UV- 



^Hy s^^Tri 




Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck. Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners 

I carry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 best 
Royal Swans of England T have fine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES. PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneckand fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have fiO acres 
of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER, LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere — it will pay you to do »o. Your visit solicited. 
I am only 60 miles from New York and 30 miles from Philadelphia. 



f«r.'i»« i 




::\ 


I ' \ 




v3§..j 


, . ■ 




' -wfliP 



WM. J. MACKENSEN 



Department V. 



YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letterj: "Yours for More Game." 



132 



THE GAME BREEDER 



/<. . 



*l **-■ 



w-S 



■ v.- 



Wild Water Fowl 

"Our Specialties/' 

Wood Duck-;, Mandarins, Wild Black 
Mallards for slocking game preserves. 
Safe delivery guaranteed. 500 Can- 
ada Wild Geese, $8.00 to $10.00 per 
pair. Australian, South American, 
Carolina Swans. 200 trained English 
Decoy Ducks, guaranteed Callers and 
Breeders, $5.00 per pair. Eggs, 15 for 
$2.00. Mallards and Canada Geese 
must be bought NOW to breed this 
Spring. For prices of other wild fowl 
apply to 

WHEALTON WILD WATER-FOWL FARMS 
Chincoteague Island, Virginia 




FISHEL'S FRANK 



The Best in 
Pointers 

Puppies, Broken Dogs 

and Brood Bitches, by 

Champion Comanche 

Frank, Fishel's Frank 

and Champion Nicholas 

R. 

Write me your wants, please. 

U. R. FISH EL 
Box 35 HOPE, IND. 



M. G. and F. G. L 

Can you guess it? 








t^j&SftKffi 



THE LURE OF WILD RICE 

bring Ducks hundreds of miles— my Wild Rice 
Seed for planting is the finest of the year— also 
Wild Celery, Wapato, and other natural foods 
that Ducks love. 

Terrell's Famous Wild Fowl 

Strong, healthy, fresh from their native haunts — 
for breeding or stocking purposes. I have the 
Wild Fowl that are considered best in the 
country. Mallards, Black Ducks, Canvasbacks, 
Wood Ducks, Pintails, Teal, Geese, Pheasants, 
etc., and Wild Mallard eggs in Spring from 
birds of strong flying strain. 

Write tor My Free Instructive Booklet. 

CLYDE B. TERRELL 

Naturalist 
Department P OSHKOSH, WISCONSIN 



Game Birds 

I am offering for immediate delivery 
the following hand-reared birds. These 
birds are in every way extra choice, being 
thoroughly acclimated, requiring no 
housing in the winter and most desirable 
for breeding in the coming Spring. 

Genuine WILD Mallard ducks $5.00 per pair 

Decoy Mallards 3.00 " " 

Wood duck 16.00 " " 

Mated Canadian geese 10.00 " " 

Also Pintails, Black duck, Widgeon, 
Red-heads*, Blue-bills, Greet.- and Blue- 
Winged Teal, etc., and several varieties 
of Wild Geese. 

RING NECK Pheasants $5.50 per pair 

Golden Pheasants 15.00 " " 

Also Silver, Amherst, Reeves Pheas- 
ants and Common Bantams for pheasant 
rearing. 

Safe Delivery Guaranteed. 

JOHN HEYWOOD 
Box B Gardner, Mass. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



1M 



DALCARLIA GAME FARM 

Wild Turkeys, English Pheasants, Quail, Plymouth Rock, 
Rhode Island Red and Brown Leghorn Chickens, White 
African, Pearl and Lavender Guineas. 

Located at HANCOCK, MARYLAND 

Address all communications to 
HENRY P. BRIDGES, 1109 Calvert Building, BALTIMORE, MD. 



THE PORTAGE HEIGHTS GAME FARM 

ROBERT J. MoPHAIL, Head Keeper 
Portage Heights, Akron, Ohio 

Ring-Necked Pheasants Eggs For Sale 

PRICES : 

For delivery prior to May 1 5, $25.00 per hundred For delivery after May 15, $20.00 per hundred 

$3.00 per dozen 

All our pheasant hens are mated with imported cocks. 



J. R. GAMMETER, 



Portage Heights, Akron. Ohio 




Established 1 860 Telephone 4569 Spring 

FRED SAUTER 

Leading Taxidermist of America 
42 Bleecker Street New York City 

Corner Lafayette Street Subway Station at the Door. 

Specialist in All Branches of Taxidermy 

Write for Illustrated Catalogue 



[BO 



GUN 
CLEANER 



[B0 



has been found satisfactory to a large 
army of sportsmen and trap-shooters. 
You will find it so if you will give it 
a trial. It is a lubricating nitro solvent 
and rust and lead remover of the 
highest efficiency. Sold as follows: 
bottle of Gun Cleaner, 25 cents ; 
handy package containing cleaner and 
oil. 25 cents, and large pint club cans, 
$2 00. We will send a 25 cent pack- 
age by mail anywhere in the United 
States, and the can plus 25 cents to 
pay parcel post or express. 

LBO is endorsed by J. S. Fanning 
of the Du Pont Powder Company of 
New York, and Fred Gilbert of Spirit 
Lake, Iowa. 



LBO COMPANY 

PORT RICHMOND NEW YORK 



134 



THE GAME BREEDER 




Midwinter Fun 
with a Scatter Gun 



Don't hibernate. Don't be a bear. e New Year right. 

Get a gun and get out in the open. Fill your lungs full of the 
crisp healthy air. Develop, your arms, your eye and your aim. Get 
your share of the sport of sports. Try your skill with the frisky 
clay- pigeons. Begin 

TRAPSHOOTING 

Trapshooting is a real man's game filled with vigor, vim and 
exhilaration. Every target holds a challenge to your skill and judg- 
ment. And every shot jnst makes you crave for more. 

Join your local gun club now. Get in the game. If a club's 
not handy get a 



aUPONP Hand Trap 



Its tantalizing targets will give you sport galore. John B. 
Burnham says it's great practice for both experts and beginners and 
develops crack field shots. $4.00 at your dealer's. If he can't supply 
you, send it prepaid anywhere in the United States upon receipt of price. 

Write for booklets, "The Sport Alluring," and 
"The Du Pont Hand Trap, No. 354." 

E. I. Du Pont de Nemours & Company 



WILMINGTON 



ESTABLISHED 1802 

Pioneer Powder Makers of America 



DELAWARE 



THE GAME BREEDER 



All the Wild Game 
You Want 

FOR many years we in America have spent much 
time bemoaning the disappearance of our feath- 
ered game. But the fact that we have little game 
to shoot and little to eat is due solely to our own lack 
of initiative. We should have an abundance of game 
in the fields and on the market. We may obtain such 
an abundance by creating a supply equal to the de- 
mand. This can be done by increasing nature's out- 
put through game farming. And moreover, the de- 
mand may be much greater than at present, and still 
be easily met. 

We have the land available to make America the 
greatest game producing country in the world. Uti- 
lize it, and everyone will have more opportunities to 
indulge in field sports. There will be more shoot- 
ing for all of us, whether or not we have access to a 
preserve, because game that is raised for sporting 
purposes can not be confined in any restricted area. 
Wherever game is intensively cultivated, we find 
improved shooting in all the surrounding territory. 

To anyone who has a small amount of land, game farm- 
ing- will prove profitable. The demand for eggs and for 
breeding stock is much greater than the supply, and will be 
for years to come. Pheasant eggs sell today at from $20 to 
$25 a hundred. Live birds bring from $5 to $7 a pair. 

To those who own large acreage, game farming will either 
provide sport, or profit from those who will pay for the sport. 

To the city man, it opens the possibility of enjoying good 
hunting near home. 

To everyone who shoots, it will bring increased pleasure 
afield. 

Game farming means an addition to our food supply that 
will be welcome to all. 

But this subject is too big to be properly treated in this space. 
Write for the book, "Game Farming for Profit and Pleasure," which 
will be sent to you without cost. It tells of the subject in a most in- 
teresting and informative manner. Fill out the coupon below and a 
copy will be mailed you at once. 

Game Breeding Department, Room 200 

HEUfULBS POWDER CO. 

Manufacturers of Explosives; Infallible and "E.C." Smokeless Shotgun Powders; L. A R. Orange 
Extra Black Sporting Powder; Dy.iamite for Farming. 

Wilmington, Delaware 



Game Breeding Department, Room 200, 

Hercules Powder Company, Wilmington, Del. 

Gentlemen: — Please send me a copy of Game Farming for Profit 
and Pleasure. I am interested in game breeding from the 



Rind-Necked 

Pheasant. 

First imported 

from China in 

1881. Now beimj 

bred in "Fairly 

lar^e numbers 




136 



THE: GAME BREEDER 



*\ 



REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 

Beautiful Farm 

Plainfield, Hampshire County, Mass. 

Suitable for Game Farm or 
Preserve — at Villa View, a noted 
Summer Resort for 30 years. 
Fifteen miles North of Williams- 
burg. 

^" 1&* 9&* 

Trout Ponds and Trout Streams 

Orchards bearing a great variety 

of Fruits — Berries abundant 

ijr* t&t i£^ 

Excellent Farm and Wood- 
lands, House, including Furni- 

« 

ture, Barns, Ice Houses, Hen Houses, Carriage Houses. 

HORSES /. COWS 
SWINE IMPLEMENTS 

JAMES F. GURNEY, Owner 

Care GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, New York City 




The above is an old stamping ground of The Dean of American 
Sportsmen, Charles Hallock, who says it will make a most desirable 
shooting box for some reader of The Game Breeder.— Editor. 



V 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yoursfor More Game. 




UM C 

Rifles and Cartridges 
for Real .22 Sport 

IN the .22 caliber as in the 
high-power arms, your 
shrewd sportsman selects his 
rifle and cartridges for results. 

And when you start to be critical, there's no- 
where to stop short of Remington- UMC. 

Made in Single Shot models — in Slide-Action 
models, with the famous Remington-UMC solid 
breech— and now, the Autoloading model that 
succeshdly handles 16 Remington Autoloading rim- 
fire cartridges without reloading. 

For real .22 sport, get your rifle and cartridges from the 
dealer who displays the Red Ball Mark of Remington-UMC. 



Grand Prized 



est Possible Honors- v 1/ 1 Firp^rm^ 

„„rded ,0 testaM ..uMc ^Modern AntS 



he Panomo-Pocilic Exposition 



and 
Ammunition" 



Remington Arms- Union 
Metallic Cartridge Co. 

Wool worth Building New York City 

233 Broadway 



.22 Autoloading 
Rifle 



T! 22R6HINCT0N 

U I AUTOIOAOINO 

/. SMOKElISS 









.22 Slide Action 
Repeater 



SPRATT'S 
Pheasant Food 

No. 3 

is rich in ingredients composed of 
and supplying carbo-hydrates and 
frame-building elements and which 
are very easily assimilated into the 
system. 

Being a cooked food it is part 
pre-digested. It is best prepared 
with hot water and then allowed to 
cool, feeding it to the birds as the 
warm soft food. 

The natural adjuncts to this highly vitalizing meal are 

SPRATT'S CRISSEL 

a perfect substitute for insect life and Ants' eggs and the purest 
form of meat obtainable. 

SPRATT'S CARDIAC OR GAME SPICE 

which contains valuable stimulating and appetizing properties 
.and should be added to staple food during raw and inclement 
.weather, and 

SPRATT'S PHEASANTINA 

A fine mixture of choice meals scientifically blended to 
supply the elements necessary for the formation of bone, body 
and muscle. It can also be used as an appetizer when the birds 
are off their feed. 

We also manufacture the following: 

SPRATT'S PHEASANT MEAL No. r 2 (for Pheasants, Part- 
ridge and quail chicks). 

SPRATT'S PHEASANT MEAL No. 5 (for young Pheasants). 
SPRATT'S MAXCO (the most nourishing food obtainable). 
SPRATT'S WILD DUCK MEAL (the best food for Ducklings 1. 

Send 25c for " Pheasant Culture." "Poultry Culture " sent on receipt of 10c. 

SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED 



NEWARK, N. J. 



iiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiii, 



#122 PerYear 



r.illllllllllllllllMllllllllillllllllillllllllHIUIIIIIIII 





Single Copies 10 <l 

t m i M iiiiiiiiiii u iiii i i i i i iiii i i i iiiii ii ii i i H iii n i ii i ii ii 




^.U<j -y |_ J ^ 



GAH E BBE 




VOL. VIII. 



FEBRUARY, 1916 






\**»#Jll||fc:r 



The- Object op this magazine is 
to Make- North America the- 5iggest 
Game Producing Country in the World 



AMERICAN WOODCOCK. SEE PAGE 147. 



dy 



PUBLISHED B1" 

THE GAME CONSERVATION SOCIETY, Inc. 

NEW YORK CITr 0.4.A S»J>.ev/j-/S 

iiiiiiiiiifiiiHiiiiiifiiii 



N 






mik 



11 LAS 



l-S« 



*ft 






WIRE - COOPS - TRAPS 

Wire 

For Deer Parks, Rearing Fields and Kennels 

Coops and Hatching Boxes 

Traps 

For Ground and Winged Vermin 

Egg Turners, Egg Boxes for Shipping 

And all Appliances for Game Farms and Preserves 



I shall be pleased to correspond with game breeders 
who wish to purchase wire, coops, traps or any appli- 
ances for the game farm and preserve. 

Special advice given to all contemplating the game 
breeders' industry. 



F. T. OAKES 

Room 622 
150 Nassau Street New York, U. S. A. 

I do not sell live deer and game birds, or eggs 



THE GAME BREEDER 



137 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 2 cents per word. 1 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 ceuts. Postage stamps accepted in payment. " 



THE GAME 

150 Nassau Street 



BREEDER 

New York City 



LIVE GAME 



PHEASANT AND JAPANESE PHOENIX FOWL 
Eggs for sale: several varieties. S V. REEVES, 114 
E. Park Ave., Haddonfield, N. J. 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 
other animals. See display advertisement in this issue. 
WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
■antry and Game Park. 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now — the surest way to start 
breeding; this species. We are the oldest and largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country Black and White 
S^ans.Wild Ducks, etc , for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island. Va. 

WILD TURKEYS — For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County, Pa. 

FOR SALE — Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (iot) 

FOR SALE — GINSENG AND GOLDEN SEAL 
plants and seed ; Amhersts, Goldens, Silvers, Ring- 
necks HELEN BARTLETT, Cassopolis, Michigan. 

FOR SALE— LIGHT BRAHMAS; BLACK LANG- 
shans ; Cochin Bantams; Rhode Island Reds; Guineas; 
Peacocks ; Shepherd pups, $3.00. JOHN TALBOT, South 
Bend, Indiana. 

FOR SALE— GOLDEN AND SILVER PHEASANTS. 
Splendid birds. This year's hatch. Prices right. 
GENE RAHLMAN, Santa Ana, Calif. 

FOR SALE BUFFALO AND ELK IN CAR LOAD 
lots or single. Deer, Antelope, Beaver. Mink, Mountain 
Lion, Pheasants and Game Birds. Eggs in season. 
KtCNDRtCK PHEASANTRIES, Coronado Building, 
Denver, Colorado. 7-/6 

FORSALE- WILD MALLARD DUCKS. $i.2 5 EACH, 
3 for $3.50. Eggs for sale in season. A. J. APPLEBY, 
Mgr., Cherry Farm, Chester, N. J. 

5 VARIETIES OF PHEASANTS. Wild Mallards, 
Wild Geese and game. Fourteen varieties of stand- 
ard Poultry, including Turkeys. Also Elk. List free. 
G H HARRIS, Taylorville. 111. 

GOLDEN AND ENGLISH RINGNECK PHEASANT 

eggs for hatching. May to August. W.S.ALLISON, 

Mernmacport, Mass 7-76 

WILD MALLARDS DIRECT FROM CANADIAN 

Marsh Laid Eggs. Best of specimens ready to breed 

now. E. F. WATSON, 129 Michigan Ave., Detroit, 

Mich. - 2-/6 

WANTED-RUFFED GROUSE AND QUAIL. WILL 

take either in any number from one pair up. Address 

O'li > Fish & Game Division, Columbus, Ohio. 2-/6 



DEER FOR SALE 
S»-ven Tame Northern Wiscon-in Deer. Bucks and 
Does. $25 00 each. F. FERRON, 416 Wisconsin 
Avenue. Oak Park, Illinois. 



PURE BRED WILD WATERFOWL AT FOLLOW- 
ing prices: Mallards, $3.00 per pair. Pintails, $2.50 per 
pair. Green Wing Teal, $4.00 per pair. Blue Wing Teal, ' 
$3 00 per pair. Also redheads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Canvasbacks, Spoonbills, at reasonable prices, for propa- 
gating and scientific purposes. GEORGE J. KLEIN, 
Ellinwood, Kansas. 

FOR SALE— MELANOTUS, MONGOLIAN, SWIN. 
hoe eggs in season, Reeves, Amherst, Golden, Silver, 
Ringnecks stock and eggs in season. PHILIP H. TROUT, 
Kingsbridge Road, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

FOR SALE-PAIR GOLDEN, PAIR SILVER PHEAS- 

ants, $5.00 each this month. Mallard ducks, $5 00 per 

pair, eggs $2.00 per dozen. Stamp for inquiry. A. S. 

COOPER, Howell, Mich. 3-16 

GOLDEN PHEASANTS— $10.00 A PAIR. EGGS 30c 

each. FRANKLIN J. PITTS, 14 Webster St., Taunton, 

Mass. 7.76 

FOR SALE — A QUANTITY OF SILKIES AND 

other bantams for hatching pheasants and quail. Apply 

BEAL, Route 1, En?lishtown, New Jersey 2-/6 

WE HAVE FOR SALE, 250 PAIRS OF STRONG 
hardy Ring Neck Pheasants, and 150 pairs of Mallard 
Ducks. All ready and in good condition for immediate 
shooting. Address DR. C. S. FOSTER, Treasurer, Kil- 
larney Game Breeding Association, Diamond Bank 
Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

DEER WANTED— Wanted, one pair of adult fallow deer. 
State price. A. C. C, care of The Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



DOGS 



NORWEGIAN BEAR DOGS, IRISH WOLFHOUNDS, 
English bloodhounds, Russian wolfhounds, American fox- 
hounds, lion, cat, deer, wolf, coon and varmint dogs. All 
trained. Shipped on trial. Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded. Purchaser to decide. Fifty page highly 
illustrated catalogue, 5c. stamp. ROOKWOOD KEN- 
NELS, Lexington, Kentucky. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 
offer for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer hounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, beat and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin, 

FOX, COON, SKUNK AND RABBIT HOUNDS 
broke to gun and field and guaranteed. The kind that 
are bred and trained for hunting by experienced hunters. 
Fox, coon and rabbit hound pups from pedigreed stock, 
and extra fine ones, price *5.00 each. Stamp for photo. 
H. C. LYTLE. Fredericksburg, Ohio. 

WANTED— BRACE OF RETRIEVER PUPS, GOOD 

breed, also a brace of (lumber spaniel pups. Apply 

BEAL, Route 1, Englishtown, New Jersey. 2-/6 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your Inters: ''Yours for Mote Game." 



138 



THE GAME BREEDER 



game: birds wanted 

i am in the market for california moun- 

tain partridges and masked Bob-whites. F. A., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New York. 

WANTED — TO PURCHASE BELGIAN HARES. 
State price for large and small lots. L. D. HATFIELD, 
138 East 38th St., N. Y. City. 

WANTED, RUFFED GROUSE AND NORTHERN 
quail for breeding purposes. State price and number. 
LOUIS WILL, Syracuse, N. Y. 

PHEASANTS WANTED. ONLY RARE VARIETIES 

such as Tragopans, Manchurian, Firebacks, Impeyans, 

etc. Kindly quote price. A. J. MERLE, Alameda, Calif. 

SWINHOES 
WANTED — Swinhoes. State price and number. R. A. 
CHILES & CO., Mt. Sterling, Ky. 

WANTED— FANCY AVIARY PHEASANTS, RING- 
necks, peacocks, partridges, quail, prairie chickens, 
wood and mandarin ducks. Quote prices. ROBERT 
HUTCHINSON, Littleton, Colo. 



GAME EGGS 

RING NECK PHEASANT EGGS FROM CHOICE 

stock. Order now for early delivery. $2 50 per setting 

of 15 eggs. EDWARD W. DOLAN, Worthington. 

Minn. 5-16 

WILD MALLARD DUCK EGGS— APRIL TO MAY 

15, 1916, $15.00 per hundred. May 16 to July 5, 1916, 
$12 00 per hunded. Safely packed (send draft). Order 
at once. First come, first served (no limit, no discount). 
C. BREMAN CO., Danville, Illinois. 

CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATED PHEASANT BREED- 
ers offer; January, February, mallard eggs. Stamp for 
price list, pheasant, quail, duck, eggs and birds. F. D. 
HOYT, Sec, Hayward, Calif. 

ORDERS FOR RINGNECK PHEASANT EGGS- FOR 

season 1916— Fine healthy stock — Birds not related 

Price $3.50 for 15. DR. HOLMAN, Attleboro, Mass. 

PHEASANT EGGS FOR SALE; STRICTLY FRESH 
and fertile. I am now booking orders for spring and 
summer. Amherst, Golden, Silver. GRAY PHEAS- 
ANTRIES, Ward Street, Orange, New Jersey. 

EGGS FROM RINGNECK PHEASANTS, MALLARD 

ducks. All the popular breeds of high grade chickens. 

MILL ROAD POUITRY FARM, Apple Grove. 

Virginia. j. T (, 

RINGNECK PHEASANS EGGS FOR SALE. 
ISAAC SPENCER, 10 Wayne Ave., Ipswich, Mass. 3-ib 



GAMEKEEPERS 



SITUATION WANTED-HEAD GAMEKEEPER OR 
Superintendent of large estate cr game preserve. Very 
capable man to show sport. Thoroughly experienced 
rearing pheasanis, partridge, quail and wild ducks. 
Management of incubators hatching pheasant and duck 
eggs. Also breeding, training and handling high class 
shooting dogs. Excellent trapper, competent manager. 
Reference present employer. GAMEKEEPER, 157 East 
69th St., New York. 



SITUATION WANTED 
Wanted situation as gamekeeper. Experienced in 
wild duck rearing and pheasants; the trapping of 
vermin, and dog breaking. Apply H. H., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



GAMEKEEPER—WANTS SITUATION FOR NEXT 
season. Skilled in pheasant and duck rearing. Will be 
open for employment January 1st. Reason for changing; 
position is desire to get a change of climate for family 
A. E. JAMES, care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., 
New York City. 

UNDERKEEPER— WANTED A GOOD MAN WHO 
thoroughly understands pheasant rearing, willing and 
obliging. Age about 24 years. Send full particulars of 
references to REARER, care of The Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St , New York City. 7-/6 

GAMEKEEPER REQUIRES SITUATION. UNDER- 

stands all duties. Best references from Europe and 

this country. Address M. F.. care of The Game Breeder, 

150 Nassau Street. New York. 



WANTED- SITUATION 
As Superintendent or Manager on a game farm or 
preserve. Experienced in game and poultry breeding. 
Good reason for desiring change of location. Would 
take an interest in a game farm to breed game com- 
mercially. Address C. McM., office of The Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New York City. 



SUPERINTENDENT.— Wanted, by experienced man, 
25 years, first-class references from large estates and 
game farms where 3,000 pheasants have been penned and 
20,000 raised yearly. Understand the raiding of all kinds 
of game and wild duck, management of incubators, testing 
of eggs, trapping of vermin, trainine and management of 
dogs and all duties making of rabbit warrens. W. B., 
care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 

EXPERIENCED UNDER KEEPER WANTED FOR 

Private Estate. Single man, age 20 to 24. Applv to 

T. B., care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New 

York City. 

WANTED— A THOROUGHLY EXPERIENCED MAN 

to taise pheasants, who understands planting and pro- 
tecting quail. English or Scotch, married with small 
family. Location, Virginia.— T. D.. care of The Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau Street, New Yoik City. 



REAL ESTATE 



Robinson Crusoe's Island Outdone! 

ST. VINCENT ISLAND, FLA., in the Gulf of 
Mexico, containing over 13,000 acres of pine for- 
est, fresh water lakes, grassy savannahs, wild boar, 
native Virginia and Osceola deer, also imported 
India deer, wild cattle, turkey, millions of ducks and 
all varieties of fish. The Island with bungalows, 
hunting lodges, yacht, boats and vehicles for sale 
to close an estate. Easily protected. Many thou- 
sand acres of forest pine trees. Booklet sent on 
request. For information inquire V. M. PIERCE, 
663 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 



GAME BREEDING FARM WANTED 
Wanted to purchase or rent a small place in one 
of the Eastern States where game breeding is legal. 
A small farm with a pond and stream is desired. 
State price and location. M. A. C, care of The 
Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



WANTED PARTNER— TO TAKE AN INTEREST 
in a deer park and preserve near New York. 150 acres 
fenced with eight foot fence, containing deer and an 
abundance of ruffed grouse. Two trout streams and 
splendid water for wild duck breeding G. B.. care ot The 
Game Breeder. 150 Nassau St , New York City. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

"PHEASANT FARMING," AN ILLUSTRATED 
practical booklet on pheasant rearing, postpaid, fif'.y 
cents Circular, all necessary pheasant equipment free. 
SIMPSON'S PHEASANT FARM, Corvallis, Oregon. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



13£ 



WHITE'S PRESERVE -WILD CELERY AND ALL 
kinds of wild duck food, plants and seeds. Also enter 
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140 THE GAME BREEDER 



CONTENTS 



Survey of the Field — The Annual Game Law Outrage— Let Her Go Gallagher 
— And Happy Boots Wilson Also — Quite A List of Prisoners—Let Her Go and 
the Turkeys — A Dangerous Overflow — Game Breeders' Advantages — The Tanen- 
baum Outrage — Upland Shooting in Ohio — Amend the Laws — California — 
Westward the Course of Empire — Mallards — Mosquitoes — Esoteric News. 

The Prairie Grouse - ■ - - - D. W. Huntington 

The Vanishing Woodcock - Illustration, American and European Woodcock 
A Deer Experience - - - - - - J. B. Foote 

The Band-Tailed Pigeon ----- Stanley G. Jewett 

Game Farming vs. Commercial Fishing - Fred D. Hoyt 

Notes from the Game Farms and Preserves. 

Editorials — An End to Foolishness — Birds for Propagation — Money in Prairie 

Chickens — The Annual Outrage. 

Correspondence — Book Notices, Trade Notes, Etc. 



To THE GAME BREEDER, 

150 Nassau Street, New York. 

Please send me THE GAME BREEDER, for one year. 

$1.00 enclosed. 

Name 

Street 

City 

State 



N. B.— Write Name and Street Address plainly and state if you 
wish hack numbers of the magazine to the first of the year. 



T he Game Breeder 

Published Monthly. Entered as second-class matter. July a, 1915, at the Post Office, New York City, 

New York, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



VOLUME VIII 



FEBRUARY, J9J6 
SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER 5 



The Annual Game Law Outrage. 

There seems to be something radically 
wrong with the game laws under which 
a number of respectable citizens of this 
State have been victimized of late. 
Either the law is pernicious or its ad- 
ministration is oppressively harsh. In- 
deed it rather looks as if both conditions 
existed. 

As matters stand, a citizen does in one 
State a perfectly legal act for which he 
is penalized immediately upon his en- 
trance into another. It is idle to say 
that bringing the game one has shot into 
New York is a separate proceeding from 
the killing of it. This is only so as a 
fiction of law. The game is killed for 
use and enjoyment and the transporta- 
tion of it to one's home is all part of one 
continuous responsibility. The infliction 
of a penalty for the final acts necessary 
to the completion of a hunting trip is 
unreasonable and unjust to a preposter- 
ous degree. 

This is the reason why so many repu- 
table people are caught in the nasty trap 
which their State and its officials lay for 
them. The law is so incredible that 
many persons do not suspect its exist- 
ence. The man who has killed or even 
bought a bird or animal in innocence 
cannot believe that his own State has a 
pack of spies waiting to waylay him on 
his arrival home to rob him of his prop- 
erty and inflict a fine equal to that im- 
posed in courts for serious offences. 

There is, unfortunately, no doubt as 
to the power of the Legislature to pass 
this law. But there is equally little 
doubt as to the injustice of it. It would 
seem as if there could not be too much 
haste in amending it so as to admit to 
the State unpenalized at least the bag of 



each individual hunter shot in a State 
where the killing was legal and still re- 
maining in his own control. Whatever 
may be said of commercial importation, 
this much at least is demanded by com- 
mon sense. — N. Y. Evening Sun. 

Let Her Go Gallagher. 

We presume one of the official reports 
of the "outrage," sent to Albany, read 
something like this : 
To Hon. George D. Pratt, 

Game Conservation Commissioner of 
New York: 

I arrested a New York lady as she 
stepped from the train, upon her return 
from her Southern farm where she rears 
game. I took her quail away from her, 
threatened her with a jail sentence; I 
settled with her for $50 (amount in- 
closed), which was about all I thought 
she would stand for, and then I Let Her 
Go- 
Gallagher, 
Division Chief Game Warden, 
Southern District, N. Y. 

A wonderful performance that for a 
high salaried official ! The Evening 
Sun, N. Y., mildly referred to it as "the 
annual game law outrage" and let it go 
at that. 

And Happy Boots Wilson Also. 

The excellent story of "the annual 
game law outrage," printed in the Sun, 
N. Y., says that Happy Boots Wilson 
and his employer were surprised at the 
conduct of Let Her Go Gallagher and 
his band. It seems that a squirrel was 
legally killed on a Southern plantation 
and that Happy Boots, traveling with 
his employer, was legally possessed of 
the food until he ran across the New 



142 



THE GAME BREEDER 



York game banditti, who legally are en- 
titled to dispossess people of the food 
they own provided they decide to take 
it home to eat. We thought the infested 
region of New Jersey, where similar out- 
rages occurred at one time, abundantly, 
was the limit. The State game officer, 
however, issued permits to some of the 
writer's friends giving them a reasonably 
safe journey through the infested region 
until the band was broken tip. New 
York now is . entitled to first honors 
when it comes to . working "the annual 
game law outrage." 

Quite a List of Prisoners. 

The article in the Sun gives the names 
ojE quite a long list of prominent people 
who were shaken down for various sums 
(about what they would stand) in order 
to avoid going to jail. They lost the 
food they owned ; .they paid in order to 
avoid going to jail. There are cities in 
the United States where such outrages 
are not tolerated. No regular policeman 
could be found willing to perform the 
nasty work the game police do. No self- 
respecting sheriff or constable could be 
found willing to perform as the game 
police are required to perform. Hence 
it is we must have an extraordinary 
force, operating independently of the po- 
lice, sheriffs and constables, whose 
duties only require them to arrest people 
who are guilty of wrongdoing. This ele- 
ment of wrongdoing is absent in most of 
our so-called game law crimes. 

Is it a crime to rear food birds? To 
have food legally procured in possession ? 
To take it home and eat it? Certainly 
not! "Truly," said the dean of Amer- 
ican sportsmen, Charles Hallock, "we 
need a revolution of thought and a re- 
vival of common sense." 

Let Her Go Gallagher and the Turkeys 

It was Gallagher who informed us 
that we could not eat the wild turkeys, 
reared by industrious game breeders and 
donated to the Game Conservation So- 
ciety for its dinner. Of course we did 
not wish to have unsuspecting guests of 
the society taken to the jails for such 
crime and we gracefully submitted, using 
tamer turkeys for the dinner. We can 



readily understand that the average game 
policeman might make a mistake since 
the wild turkey undoubtedly is related to 
the quail and the quail is being "pro- 
tected off the face of the earth," by game 
laws, as the distinguished naturalist, Dr. 
Shufeldt, has well said. 

We do not quite understand how it is 
that turkeys not quite so wild as those 
donated for the dinner are exempt from 
"fool" game laws while the others (also 
produced by industry) are not exempt. 
To be logical it occurs to us the statutes 
should protect the tame turkeys "off the 
face of the earth." Blackstone says 
criminal laws should be uniform, uni- 
versal and easily to be understood. Why 
it is a crime to eat one turkey produced 
by industry and not another, which re- 
sembles it more than it does a quail, we 
fail to understand. 

A Dangerous Overflow. 

A man who called at the office of the 
Game Breeder a few days ago said that 
one of the gamekeepers at a club in 
which we are interested told him the 
following interesting little story. 

A neighbor remarked to the keeper 
one day that he was tempted to shoot 
one of the pheasants which overran his 
place, evidently coming from the club 
grounds. The keeper said he had heard 
Mr. Huntington say that was what the 
"overflow" was for, and that he was sure 
there would be no objection if he shot 
pheasants on his land, provided the game 
officers did not object; the club certainly 
would not. A few days later the neigh- 
bor returned to say that he saw a bird 
moving in some tall grass ; thought it 
was a pheasant and fired, but he found 
he had killed one of his own Plymouth 
Rock hens. He wished to know if the 
keeper thought the club would pay dam- 
ages for the mistake which was due to 
the advice given him by the keeper. 

Game Breeders' Advantages. 

Everyone now seems to agree to the 
fact that game producers should have 
some advantages ; otherwise there would 
be no game breeding and in most places 
there would be nothing but game laws. 
Simply jailing people for having their 



THE GAME BREEDER 143 

stock birds "in possession" was not en- surprised that people can be found who 

eouraging. seem to delight in performing such duty. 

It is an advantage to shoot in the early A Connecticut dealer had some live 
autumn, during the glorious Indian sum- wild wood ducks in his possession at the 
mer weather when it is a pleasure to be poultry show. How does it happen that 
out of doors. It is an advantage to some must be fined and others not? 
make a good full bag when the oppor- Please explain, Mr. Game Commissioner, 
tunity offers and to feel that there is no = 
danger of extinction, but, on the other Upland Shooting in Ohio. 
hand, that birds which leave the "noisy Morris Ackerman, of Cleveland, Ohio, 
sanctuary" may be shot by those who do says, the woods are full of ruffed grouse, 
nothing to help increase the game supply, quail are plentiful or fairly so, Hun- 
It is an advantage to feel that no irate garian partridges and ring-necked pheas- 
farmer will take the field to order one an t s , introduced by the Fish and Game 
off, but, on the other hand, he will be Department, are doing wonderfully well, 
well pleased to join the sportsman and "But!" he says, "Our upland bird 
praise his dogs and his good shooting, shooting is closed until the fall of 1917." 
All these advantages are due to the in- Let us imagine that it be deemed 
dustrious members of the many game safe to permit shooting, even a very little, 
shooting clubs which in some States shoot in 1917, what will happen? Undoubtedly 
their game as freely as trap shooting club the history of the past will be repeated, 
members shoot their clay targets on lands Quickly the game will be reported scarce, 
which they own or rent. The farmers will be retold the story 

It is an advantage to have something about the quail that ate 8,425,675 weed 

good to eat. Something worth giving to seeds for breakfast and they will be 

a friend at the end of the day afield. urged to stop shooting again for a period 

= of five or ten years. Sportsmen who 

The Tanenbaum Outrage. h ave bought pointers or setters will 

Mr. Tannenbaum, a prominent New again find it difficult to dispose of the 
York business man, sent a tame wood animals which have been made worth- 
duck, which he owned and which died, less. How about the sales of guns and 
to New York to ascertain the cause of its ammunition? When can this industry 
death in the hope that he might prevent expect to resume business in Ohio with 
the loss of his fowls in the future. Fine any assurance of permanency? 
threatened $60; lowest cash offer to set- = 
tie, up to date, $15! A man should be Amend the Laws. 

proud to be engaged in the perpetration The New York laws should be 

of such outrages as a means of liveli- amended promptly so as to provide: 

hood. 1. That Game Breeders in other 

A Massachusetts judge, when called States may market their game in New 

upon to decide a somewhat similar crimi- York when properly identified, 

nal action, where a boy had a wild goose 2. That New York citizens who 

in his possession, said he was of the breed game in New York can no longer 

opinion the goose was probably tame — be held up by a lot of grafting special 

case dismissed. More common sense in police because they have the food which 

Massachusetts than there seems to be in .they own in their possession. These spe- 

New York. It is high time the laws cial police are compelled by law to ap- 

were changed in New York so as to pre- pear like a band of grafting banditti. It 

vent the numerous legal outrages which is no wonder that often it is difficult to 

are perpetrated every season. The peo- get respectable people to' serve. 

pie are in the habit of settling easily, The snatching of food from the hands 

simply calling the officers grafters. As of gentlemen and ladies who have pro- 

a matter of fact it seems the officers are duced it in States where there is more 

simply performing their duty. We are freedom than there is in New York; the 



144 



THE GAME BREEDER 



threatening of such people with a night 
in the Tombs if they do not put up 
about what the officer thinks they will 
stand, are not creditable performances. 
They are shocking! disgraceful! out- 
rageous ! 

California. 

Some of our California readers have 
formed the opinion that the game politi- 
cians of California are opposed to game 
breeding. We had supposed the State 
game officers of California were wide 
awake. If they show any hostility to 
the new food producing industry they 
should be bounced at once for incom- 
petence. But remember this : When you 
do get a good game commission (if the 
present one is as reported) hold on to it. 
See that it be not changed every year or 
two. We are much surprised at the re- 
ports from California. We will give 
some special attention to this State. 

"Westward the Course of Empire." 

"B'rer Possum" has arrived in Cali- 
fornia and is said to be thriving. Mr. 
Joseph Grinnell, in a contribution from 
the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, 
University of California, says, possums 
to the number of fully 200 have been re- 
ported as captured. They are presumed 
to be descended from a few animals 
which escaped from persons who im- 
ported them. Five of the possums got 
away at the game farm Oct. 13, 1914. 

Mr. Grinnel says: "It is doubtful if 
we are to consider ourselves lucky in 
having acquired this addition to our 
mammal fauna. * * * The fondness of 
the possum for fruit, eggs and poultry 
can scarcely be offset by the fact that 
some_ people consider it good to eat and 
that it is somewhat of a scavenger and 
destroyer of vermin." 

Mallards and Mosquitoes. 

Dr. Samuel G. Dixon, the Pennsyl- 
vania Commissioner of Health, writing 
for the American Medical Association 
Journal, says: "For some years I have 
been using ducks to keep down mosqui- 
toes in swamps that would have been 
difficult and expensive to drain, but I 
never fully appreciated the high efficiency 



of the duck as a destroyer of mosquito 
life until the test was made." 

He divided the swampy places into 
two equal parts, each about fourteen 
hundred square feet in area. One was 
stocked with goldfish, and the other was 
left as a feeding ground for ducks. Both 
were ideal breeding places for mosqui- 
toes. In .the fish division, mosquito 
larvae flourished, while in the side with 
the ducks, larvae were entirely absent. 
When ten mallards were placed in the 
fish pond, within 48 hours only a few 
small larvae were left. The Doctor con- 
siders that many larvae were drowned 
owing to the commotion the birds raised 
in the water. r .«_: 

Esoteric News. 

One of our New York readers send- 
ing the clipping from the New York 
Herald quoted below, says : "Here is 
some esoteric news. No one excepting 
the ones on the inside know what is 
meant by that reference to the foxes and 
hawks. I wonder they did not include 
the snapping turtles and otters which eat 
up all of my big trout. Another reader 
had just called us up on the 'phone to 
read the item and ask what it meant. 
He also mailed it to The Game Breeder 
with the request that we publish it. Here 
it is. Possibly some Connecticut reader 
can solve the riddle. 

(Special despatch to The Herald.) 

Greenwich, Conn., Friday. — One hundred 
and seventy-nine acres of Greenwich land 
were appropriated to-day by the State of Con- 
necticut for the establishment of a State game 
preserve for the propagation of game and 
game birds. The territory, which belongs to> 
Dr. Robert T. Morris, will be added to the 
tract of 165 acres obtained from the same 
holder in Stamford, 100 acres leased from 
John Wendle and 220 acres from S. W. Tay- 
lor. Each property owner receives a nominal 
fee for the State lease, not more than $5. 

The Superintendent of the State Fish and 
Game Commission will protect and encourage 
the breeding of foxes, skunks, raccoons, wild 
cats, minks, weasels, hawks and owls. The 
district will be posted and it will be illegal to 
shoot or trap game on the highways adjacent 
to the preserve. It borders on the Mianus 
River and is an ideal spot for such a feature. 



Advertising rates in The Game Breeder 
made known on application. 



THE GAME BREEDER 145 

THE PRAIRIE GROUSE. 

Eighth Paper. 
By D. W. Huntington. 

The red grouse of Europe, a grouse of machinery and. wires '(both the telegraph 
the open country which is somewhat and telephone wires and the wire fences) 
similar to our prairie grouse, sharp-tailed are additional causes of destruction and 
.grouse and heath hens, is bred abundant- many birds and eggs are destroyed an- 
ly in a wild state and thousands of birds nually by fires and floods, 
-are sent to the markets every season. It has been proved conclusively every- 
Since the discovery was made that the where in America that the prairie grouse 
red grouse quickly responds to the con- cannot withstand the additional checks 
trol of its natural enemies,' which are due to civilization and any shooting un- 
termed vermin by sportsmen and game- less the birds be properly looked after 
keepers, and that hundreds of thousands and protected from their natural ene- 
of birds can be shot every season without mies. Grouse shooting has been pro- 
danger of extinction, lands which were hibited, properly, in most of the States 
almost worthless have been utilized for where the birds still occur and it is quite 
grouse breeding and made valuable. On evident that when the shooting is again 
the moors of Scotland, where sheep are opened even for a very short season with 
reared, the grouse have been made an very small bag limits the disasters of 
additional and most valuable food. On the past will be repeated and if the shoot- 
farms where wheat and other grains are ing be not quickly stopped the grouse 
raised the grouse also have been found will be exterminated. It must be evident 
Well worth preserving. Since the birds to all intelligent sportsmen that the 
procure practically all of their food in grouse never will be restored to Ohio, 
their rambles over moors and stubbles Kentucky, and other States where form- 
they are reared inexpensively, far more erly they were plentiful until the laws 
so than pheasants can be reared, the encourage the profitable introduction and 
gamekeepers wages being the chief item propagation of these splendid food birds 
of expense. by private industry. 

Our prairie grouse thrived on the vast Besides the numerous foods mentioned 

prairies where it occurred in countless in the preceding papers the prairie 

numbers a few years ago, eating the grouse eats many flowers, leaves and 

many foods listed in Dr. Judd's excel- shoots. Like the other grouse, Dr. Judd 

lent bulletin from which I have quoted says, the prairie hen is an habitual brows- 

freely in this series of articles. Twenty er, to the extent of 25.09 per cent, of its 

tons of grouse have been sent to the food. This is divided as follows : Twigs 

New York markets at a single consign- or shoots, 0.55 per cent. ; flowers, 9.34 

ment. I have shot these birds when they per cent., and leaves, 15.20 per cent. This 

were sufficiently abundant to make it an is only half the amount of similar food 

easy matter for a few guns to shoot a taken by the ruffed grouse. Naturally 

wagon load in a day. the prairie hen is much less given to 

The birds were always most plenti- budding than ruffed grouse, but it has 

ful in places where the more important been known to pluck buds of poplar, 

foods were abundant, but they remained elm, pine, apple, dwarf birch (Betula 

in great numbers on farms where grain glandulosa), and black birch (B. lenta) . 

was planted so long as any suitable "I have counted more than 50 on a single 

nesting places remained, and the birds apple tree," writes Audubon, "the buds 

were not too much persecuted by gun- of which they entirely destroyed in a 

ners, dogs, cats and rats, in addition to few hours. * * * * They were, in 

their numerous natural enemies. Farm fact, looked upon with more abhorence 



146 



THE GAME BREEDER 



than the crows are at present in Massa- 
chusetts and Maine, on account of the 
mischief they committed among the 
fruit trees of the orchards during win- 
ter, when they fed on their buds; or 
while in the spring months, they picked 
tip the grain in the fields." This mis- 
chief, Dr. Judd well says, was due large- 
ly to the abundance of the birds, a con- 
dition never likely to return. He might 
have added that at the time Audubon 
wrote there were comparatively few or- 
chards, fruit trees and grain fields and 
that the vast "multitudes of grouse gath- 
ered where the buds and the grain could 
be obtained easily. 

The fact that the grouse, like the 
pheasants, the wild ducks and some other 
game birds and mammals may do some 
damage on a farm where they are made 
over abundant should not be used to make 
it illegal for a farmer or sporting land- 
owner to make and keep the wild food 
birds and deer plentiful on his own land 
if he wishes to do so. There can be no 
doubt there are many places where it 
would be more profitable to have grouse 
than it would be to have fruit and it- is 
not a difficult matter to employ scare- 
boys, as they do in other countries, to 
keep the game out of orchards and fields 
during tlie short periods when game may 
do some damage if produced abundantly 
for the market or for sport. The land- 
owner should decide if he wishes to have 
game for profit and he should not be 
liable to arrest for food producing which 
is a crime unknown in all countries ex- 
cepting America, where the effect of 
such crime-making has been, as often we 
have pointed out, to exterminate a tre- 
mendously valuable supply of desirable 
food animals. 

I have referred to the fact that 1 shot 
these birds and also the northern sharp 
tailed grouse when they were tremend- 
ously abundant. I have seen thousands 
of grouse in the air at a time late in the 
season when they were forming in packs 
and becoming too wild to afford good 
sport with the dogs. The lesser prairie 
hen, a bird very similar in pattern and 
markings to the common prairie grouse 
but a little smaller and lighter in color. 



was equally plentiful in the southwest, 
its range being Texas, Louisiana and 
Southwestern Kansas and Oklahoma. 
Mr. W. S. Colvin, in Outing, records 
these birds as plentiful in parts of Kan- 
sans and Oklahoma, as late as 1906. and 
he deplores their rapid extermination. 
"In the eighties," he says, "a man by the 
name of Hatch nested in the sand hills 
just inside the Kansas line in Seward 
County. Here he planted a grove of 
black locust trees and spread out his 
broad fields of maize and kaffir corn. 
The Texas bobwhites and lesser prairie 
hens soon learned that this man was a 
friend of the birds, and straightway 
made it their rendevous. Here, each fall. 
the chickens gathered by the thousands, 
and each spring spread out over the vast 
prairies, nesting and rearing their young. 
In the fall of 1904 my brother estimated 
that he saw in a single day fifteen to 
twenty thousand chickens .in and around 
this one grain field." 

In 1906, the same writer says: "In a 
cane field we saw a flock of five hundred 
or more and when they arose it seemed 
that a hole had been rent in the earth. I 
was for stopping and shooting a few. 
but Dillard said: 'Come along, those are 
only rovers, I'll show you some chickens.' 
"Soon the shooting was lively. Chick- 
ens were flushing everywhere, and droves 
of fifty to a hundred would take down 
the corn rows sounding like a moving 
avalanche as they touched the blades of 
corn." In one field, the writer says, Mr. 
Ward and I estimated there were from 
three thousand five hundred to four 
thousand chickens. In conclusion, the 
author says, he told his friend that lie 
would be, "lucky to find a few chickens 
to shoot five years from now and that is 
the truth." 

I have see-n the chickens equally abun- 
dant in North Dakota and in oilier West- 
ern States and it seems too bad that the 
birds are being actually exterminated". 
slowly in some cases, but surely, by law. 
Let the Mr. Ward referred to ( or any 
other resident where a few birds still 
occur) know that he or they can quickly 
make the birds more plentiful than they 
ever were without danger of going to 



THE GAME BREEDER 



147 



jail if he sells some of them to pay ex- 
penses, and it will not be long before the 
prairie grouse are abundant and all who 
wish to procure stock birds and eggs can 
do so. Any good sized grouse ranch 
easily should make $10,000 or $20,000 a 
year for its owner without detriment to 
the grass and grain which can be pro- 
duced on the same ground. 

In the next paper I shall describe in 
detail how the grouse on a farm or 
ranch can be made to yield from $10,000 
to $20,000 a year in the States where it 
no longer is criminal to profitably pro- 
duce wild food birds on a farm. The 
best places for grouse breeding undoubt- 
edly are places where a few grouse still 
occur. But the industry quickly can be 
made profitable in Ohio, Indiana, Ken- 
tucky, Michigan and some other States 
where grouse formerly were abundant 



but where now they are extinct, or nearly 
so. 

The law is all right in Indiana, we are 
told, but a number of "fool" sections 
must be eliminated in some of the other 
States before any industry can safely be 
undertaken. We would imagine that 
there should be no objection to introduc- 
ing grouse for profit in States where they 
are not mentioned in the laws because the 
birds have become extinct. We were told 
recently, however, that we could not eat 
wild turkeys in New York which were 
legally produced in other States, and it 
may be there are some absurd statutes 
in many States which prohibit farmers 
from introducing and breeding grouse. 
It will not be long, however, we predict, 
before all of the "fool" laws are re- 
pealed or at least amended so as to en- 
courage game breeding. 



THE VANISHING WOOD-COCK. 




American Woodcock. 

From The Cuvier 

Not lung ago the Biological Survey, 
United States Department, published a 
bulletin on "Two Vanishing Game 
Birds — The Wood-duck and the Wood- 
cock."' Breeders of wood-ducks are now 
successful in breeding this splendid wild 
fowl and there is no more danger of its 
becoming extinct in America than there 
is of its becoming extinct in Holland 
and Belgium where it was introduced 
and made plentiful by breeders from 
whoi 



n we now secure 



stock. 



European Woodcock. 
Club Collection. 

The wood-cock responds nicely to the 
practical protection given to other birds 
on game farms and preserves. I have 
observed the wood-cock breeding in 
quiet and safety on club grounds and 
game farms where wild ducks are bred 
in abundance, The control of the hawks, 
snakes, crows, dogs, cats and other ver- 
min in order to prevent them from de- 
stroying wild ducks and eggs results in 
the wood-cock finding safe nesting 
places and when there are more game 



148 



THE GAME BREEDER 



farms and preserves there will be more 
wood-cock. 

It now pays to preserve many small 
wooded swamps for both wood-duck 
and wood-cock. The big refuges for 
game in the South where shooting is 
prohibited afford safe winter quarters 
for wood-cock and the bird no longer 
should be referred to as the vanishing 
wood-cock. In foreign markets wood- 
cock are sold in the markets as food. 
We have no doubt these birds soon will 
be restored to our American markets as 
they should be as soon as they become 
plentiful on game farms and preserves 
where they are properly looked after. 



Since the birds are migratory and the 
country is big the sportsmen who do 
nothing towards practical game preserva- 
tion will undoubtedly find good wood- 
cock shooting on public lands and on 
wild lands which are not posted. They 
also may find good cock shooting on 
many farms when they obtain the 
farmer's permission to shoot. 

It is highly important that all the little 
ponds and wooded swamps where wood- 
cock can find food and cover should not 
be drained. They will not be when it 
is learned they can be made valuable for 



game. 



WILD ROSES. 

' [One of the best covers for game is a patch of wild roses. The birds will eat the rose 
hips in. winter. Our readers will be interested in the following from Rural New Yorker.— 
Editor.] 



The statement of K. that no one 
should think of planting our wild roses 
except for some very special purpose, 
should also, I think, be modified. His 
general argument would probably be that 
European or horticultural varieties 
should generally be planted, a position 
that we are rapidly progressing away 
from. If there is only room on the home 
grounds for a couple of dozen shrubs, 
perhaps single specimens of particularly 
beautiful ones would exclude most of 
the natives. But where any mass effect 
can be had, the native shrubs should cer- 
tainly have the preference. Aside from 
the laurel (which we ought to be able 
to transplant ourselves, for it is offered 
■ by the carload from Southern woods, 
and than which perhaps nothing in the 
world is more magnificent in bloom), we 
have Azaleas, perhaps next to the laurel 
in beauty, and then an enormous choice 
between thorns, Viburnums, cornels, 
elderberry, down to the bright-berried 
shrubs for winter decoration, than which 
perhaps none is more brilliant than our 
common Winter-berry or black alder. I 
have myself planted Rosa lucida and R. 
blanda in shrubberies where no culti- 
vated rose would have taken their place, 
and where their haws are very decorative 



in autumn. I think many of your read- 
ers would find it very interesting to start* 
collections of native plants, and no doubt 
the variety and beauty of those from 
which choice could be made would be a 
revelation to most of them. I am now 
planning the planting of my own home 
grounds, which will need some 500 or 
600 shrubs. Eighty per cent, or more 
will be native to the Eastern United 
States. The Arnold Arboretum, Jamai- 
ca Plain, Mass., is chiefly responsible for 
calling attention to the beauty and value 
of our native plants, and anyone inter- 
ested in the subject should get their 
bulletins. Ellicott D. Curtis. 

Connecticut. Rural New-Yorker. 



The Game Census. 

Belated returns for the game census 
still are coming. Members of the Game 
Conservation Society undoubtedly now 
own nearly if not quite 200,000 game 
birds and it is evident they will have 
over a million if the approaching breed- 
ing season is a good one. We will have 
an abundance of game of many species 
for our game dinners next winter. We 
hope we can hold all of them in New 
York. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



149 




Scene of The Experience. 



A DEER EXPERIENCE. 

By J. B. Foote. 



Some time ago you wrote me asking 
me to relate my experience with deer. 
About that time a dear experience with 
this same animal prevented my doing so. 

My interest in deer was first aroused 
about twenty years ago while visiting 
friends near Atlantic, Iowa. One after- 
noon while out for a drive I was very 
much surprised to see a herd of from 
forty to seventy-five deer. Of course I 
expected my host to be equally aston- 
ished but found they had no more effect 
upon him than a herd of cattle would 
have. Always interested in our native 
animals and the more so at this time be- 
cause of their seemingly strange ap- 
pearance in this place, I began asking 
questions concerning the deer. It seems 
that a few years previous to this time 
one of the wealthy men of that vicinity 
had decided to raise a herd of deer. 

He had succeeded in raising about 
twenty when the high waters tore away 
the fence from his deer enclosure and 
the animals escaped. He was unable to 
capture them and did not wish the ani- 
mals to be harmed. Being influential he 
succeeded in having a law passed, pro- 



viding for their protection and for the 
payment of damages by the State in case 
they should do any damage. 

A few of the deer were killed and the 
offenders were heavily fined. Shortly 
afterwards it was discovered that the 
deer had damaged some corn belonging 
to a man in the neighborhood. The 
neighboring farmers gathered to com- 
pute the loss. Their computation was so 
much larger than that of the officer sent 
by the State to compute the loss that it 
brought ridicule upon the head of the 
man whose damage loss amounted to 
comparatively nothing. No more com- 
plaints have been made and now the deer- 
roam about the country and enjoy a life 
of ease and plenty. It has been esti- 
mated that between five and fifteen 
thousand deer inhabit the banks of the 
Skunk River. Oftentimes they are seen 
grazing with the herds of cattle. 

While rabbit hunting with my host 
after this it was no uncommon experi- 
ence to see the antlers of a buck rise 
above the snow. As the deer raised his 
back and lowered his antlers we did not 
stop to dispute with him but left him 



150 



THE GAME BREEDER 



mentally agreeing that, as his manner 
suggested, truly he was "Monarch of all 
he surveyed." 

I obtained a pair of deer from that 
part of the country believing that the 
natural conditions of our State of Ohio 
were favorable for raising the animals. 
Each year they have given me the 
natural number of young, one fawn 
from the two-year-old and two after- 
wards. This year we were agreeably 
surprised to find hidden in the long 
grass two little spotted fawn from each 
doe although not all due by age. Only 
two of these lived for six weeks, at that 
time dying within an hour of each other. 
After this my three youngest and my 
oldest buck died. I thought at the time 
that my misfortune was perhaps due to 
the lack of range for grazing purposes 
and also lack of variety in food. I as- 
certained later that a gentleman at Ur- 
bana had a herd of fifty enclosed on a 
few acres and had raised deer there for 
several years without any trouble. 

I changed my deer recently to an en- 



closure having a larger variety of trees 
and shrubbery. Previously to this time 
I had never been able to get the deer to 
approach a building but a few days after 
they had been changed to their new 
quarters, three of them entered a small 
door, passed through several dark alleys 
out into the barn and thence chose the 
path of the prodigal. For a while great 
excitement prevailed in the surrounding- 
country over the strange appearance of 
wild deer until it was generally known 
that some of my deer were missing. Two 
of these I was able to get back again. At 
present I have Virginia does and a Fal- 
low buck and would be glad to hear from 
any reader who has crossed the two suc- 
cessfully. I never heard of my escaped 
deer being shot at, which proves to my 
mind the theory that deer could be rais- 
ed as profitably in Ohio as in Iowa. My 
deer generally became poor in summer 
and fattened after they had rubbed the 
velvet off of their horns. This year the 
buck instead of fattening- died. 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 



Wild Duck Enemies. 

Editor Game Breeder : 

The party for whom you are seeking 
instructions in catching snapping turtles 
is, undoubtedly, raising ducklings. He 
may know to a certainty that it is tur- 
tles that are making havoc with his 
brood. Large water snakes and eels are 
both guilty of the same offense. I knew 
of a party two years ago on the Mohawk 
near Utica that missed many young- 
ducklings or chickens. He laid it to 
mink and sat up one night determined 
to catch the marauder. The stillness was 
broken soon by a rumpus in one of the 
coops and to his surprise found a large 
eel had one of the ducklings and was 
making for the river in the damp grass. 
He was finally rewarded by getting two 
more eel- all on the same job. The coops 
were several rods from the river. 

The steel trap for catching snapping 



turtles in my judgment would be our No. 
12 Jump Trap, price 35 cents, plus post- 
age on 19 ounces. The trap should be 
set with the jaws running lengthwise of 
the runway the turtle takes, and it is 
well to put a twig or stake on either side 
of the runway as seen in accompanying 
sketch so as to avoid his passing over 
the center of either jaw, as in such case 
in springing the jaw has a tendency to 
throw the animal out of the trap. The 
trap should not be set in center of run- 
way but at least three inches either side 
of center as they travel wide. 

Turtles can also be caught with small 
short stocky fish hooks with an eye in the 
shank. Do not use copper wire, as a 
large snapper will bite it off, but instead, 
use fine steel wire. Bait with a small 
fish. 

1 also enclose a sketch of a home- 
made trap which speaks for itself. 

M. T. Newhouse. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



151 



Meal Worms. 

>ne of our subscribers writes for in- 
formation about meal worms; where he 
can procure them and how they are prop- 
agated. 

These worms are used in feeding small 
birds but we have never seen them used 
on any of the American game farms and 
preserves. We shall be glad to hear 
from game keepers and others who may 
have information on this subject. 

Replying to your letter of Jan. 4th, 
we beg to advise that meal worms can 
be grown by the following method: 

"Obtain an old barrel and place in the 
bottom a few pieces of bread over which 
sprinkle sufficient water to make it damp 
but not soppy. Over this place a thick 
piece of paper and on top of same two 
or three layers of old white rags. The 
meal worms must be placed in the bot- 
tom of barrel with the bread. They can 
be obtained from almost any bird store 
and those wishing to follow these in- 
structions can grow their own worms 
without much difficulty." 

In addition to the bread, some people 
sprinkle a small quantity of wheat bran 
On same. 

We are making inquiries in regard to 
Hue Pit Game and shall write to you 
further upon the subject. 

We presume that you will send us 
contract for current year for our sig- 
nature and files in the near future. 
Yours faithfully, 

Spratt's Patent, Ltd. 



Are Muskrats Vegetarians? 

Mr. J. H. Tubbs, writing to the 

Rural New-Yorker says: 

"I have just read with surprise Prof. Mas- 
sey's statement that muskrats are 'entirely 
vegetarian' in their eating'. It seems almost 
like an impertinence to take issue with so 
eminent an authority as Prof. Massey, but I 
know positively that he is mistaken in this 
matter. 1 myself have seen a muskrat grab 
a wild duck and take it to his den in the 
bank of a stream. I remember, too, of read- 
ing somewhere that they are very destructive 
to young wild water fowl of all kinds; also 
that they are yreat egg eaters." 

Most naturalists believe the muskrat 



is largely if not wholly a vegetarian. 
We have referred to the fact that wild 
ducks often are abundant on ponds 
where muskrats are abundant. We 
know a gamekeeper, however, who says 
he has seen a muskrat take a good sized 
duck and now Mr. Tubbs says he has 
seen a muskrat "grab" one. 

Probably there are muskrats and 
muskrats, just as there are hawks and 
hawks, some having perverted appetites. 
The marsh hawk was pronounced a 
"beneficial" hawk, but the keepers on 
Martha's Vineyard, say he takes many 
heath hens and is, in fact, one of the 
worst enemies of this grouse. It may 
be that the muskrats in some places, and 
possibly in all, take more ducks than 
they are believed to take. Gamekeepers 
soon find out what is destroying their 
game and soon put an end to the vermin 
or reduce its numbers sufficiently to 
show a big increase in the numbers of 
the game birds. 

We shall be glad to print anything our* 
readers may say about muskrats and 
ducks. Since there were no muskrats in 
the ponds where we have reared wild 
clucks, we have had no personal experi- 
ence with this subject. We have, how- 
ever, often seen wild ducks swimming 
about where the muskrats did not seem 
to alarm them, and it occurred to us the 
ducks would show fear if the muskrats 
were in the habit of destroying them. 
The safe rule on a game farm or pre- 
serve is to see what they do and act 

accordingly. 

♦ 

The Sale of Venison in Maine. 

Chief Game Warden Frank M. Per- 
kins of Bangor, made a few remarks on 
the law applying to the sale of deer meat 
as follows : 

"A marketman or provision dealer 
having an established place of business, 
selling deer meat under a license may 
have in his possession at the close of the 
season three deer to cut up and sell to 
his local customers, but must not buy 
any more after the season closes. No 
deer shall be transported out of the State 
by a resident of Maine after 12 o'clock 
p. m. Wednesday, Residents arc allow- 



152 



THE GAME BREEDER 



ed a reasonable time to get deer from 
the woods to his own home but not other- 
wise." 

Speaking of the term "reasonable 
time," Mr. Perkins said that he at one 
time consulted a supreme court justice 



as to what he considered was meant by 
the law in this case, and he gave the 
opinion that three or four days was a 
reasonable time for men to ship their 
game from the woods.- — Maine Woods.. 



THE BAND-TAILED PIGEON. 

By Stanley G. Jewett. 

[The band-tailed pigeon should be made very abundant on big game farms and preserves,, 
just as the wood-pigeon has been made abundant in England. The owners easily can pre- 
vent the birds doing damage. — Editor.] 



Occasionally a report is sent in to our 
office to the effect that wild pigeons are 
destroying crops in some of the coast 
counties. To ascertain the facts regard- 
ing the food habits and abundance of 
these birds, Mr. Jewett spent the greater 
part of the month of May in 1913 in 
Tillamook county. He was in the field 
• each day from May 2 to and including 
May 25 and collected the following data : 

The wild pigeons arrive in Tillamook 
County from the south about the first 
week in April and become common about 
the 20th of the month. At this time 
most of the farmers are sowing oats, and 
the pigeons congregate in flocks of from 
twenty to one hundred, and from the 
evidence I gathered, they feed mainly on 
oats picked up from the surface of the 
ground. All the pigeons I saw were in 
the agricultural districts where they re- 
main until the elderberries are sufficiently 
grown to offer them food. I was told by 
several local farmers and sportsmen that 
elderberries, huckleberries, salal and cas- 
cara berries are the main food supply of 
the pigeons during the summer and early 
fall months. 

The food supply appears to be the 
main controlling factor in the distribu- 
tion of the pigeon. In early spring when 
the oats are first sown or just sprouting, 
the birds are to be found in the fields, a 
little later they will be found along the 
rivers and foothills where the elderberry 
is plentiful, and in the fall on the open 
hills along the coast where they find an 
abundance of huckleberries. 

Several complaints reached me of the 



damage done by pigeons to the oat crop 
in Tillamook County, but upon interview- 
ing several reliable farmers, I came. to 
the conclusion that most, if not all, of 
these reports were greatly exaggerated. 
For example, on May 5 a farmer living 
along \Vilson River about five miles 
from Tillamook sowed a ten-acre field, 
to oats; next day I saw some fifty or 
sixty pigeons about this field. I again, 
visited the place on May 24, and found 
a good stand of oats about three inches 
high. I never knew of this bird pulling- 
up rooted grain, although some kernels 
with sprouts as long as three-quarters of 
an inch were found in the crop. It is a 
well-known fact that grain lying on the 
ground in wet climates will sprout, but 
one or two days' sunshine will shrivel 
it up and make it entirely worthless, so 
the pigeons should be welcome to it. 

Their method of feeding is very in- 
teresting. A flock will circle over a field 
several times before lighting, when all 
at once they drop to the ground, and in- 
stead of spreading out, keep close to- 
gether, alternately walking and flying, 
some in the air all the time, others walk- 
ing along picking up kernels of oats left 
on the surface of the ground. Then all 
at once the flock rises and flies off to 
some tall, dead spruce or alder tree to 
rest awhile before the performance is 
done all over again. 

On rainy days I believe the pigeons 
feed off and on all day, but on clear days 
most of the feeding is done during the 
early morning hours and just before sun- 
down in the evening. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



153 



Data in regard to the nesting habits of 
the. band-tailed pigeon are greatly de- 
sired. I met two persons, only, in Tilla- 
mook County who had seen their nests. 
Mr. A. Biggs told me of seeing "a nest 
in a vine-maple tree on Sutton Creek 
some years ago," and his son-in-law 
says : "I saw two nests placed in alder 
trees near Tillamook River; both were 
high up and contained young late in the 
summer." On May 4, I shot a female 



from which I took a fully developed egg 
with a soft shell. Several females shot 
from May 5 to May 10 showed every 
evidence of breeding. 

The flesh of the band-tailed pigeon is 
delicious and compares favorably with 
that of other game birds. The average 
weight of ten* birds killed in May was 
three-quarters of a pound each, weighed 
shortly after being shot. 



Table Showing the Results of Examination of 22 Crops and Stomachs of Band- 
tailed Pigeon (Columba fasciata) From Tillamook, Oregon. 



Collector's 


Date 


t 






No. 


Sex. 


1913 




Crop. 


Stomach — 


1496 


Male 


May 


3 


848 oats 


Partly digested oats 


1498 


Female 


a 


4 


Empty 


Oat hulls 


1499 


Female 


a 


4 


65 oats 


Oat hulls 


1500 


Female 


a 


4 


Empty 


Oat hulls 


1501 


Male 


it 


4 


85 oats 
2 wheat 


Partly digested oats and hulls 


1502 


Male 


u 


5 


112 oats 
1 wheat 


Partly digested oats and hulls 


1503 


Female 


a 


6 


247 oats 


Partly digested oats 


1504 


Female 


a 


6 


Empty 


Few oat hulls 


1505 


Male 


it 


6 


Empty 


Partly digested oats 


1506 


Male 


it 


6 


Empty 


Oat hulls 


1511 


Female 


it 


10 


631 oats 

25 wheat 
1 unidentifiec 
seed 


Partly digested oats 
I 


1512 


Male 


ti 


11 


49 oats 

2 unidentifiec 

seeds 


Oat hulls 


1513 


Male 




11 


Empty 


Few oat hulls 


1514 


Female 




11 


Empty 


Oat hulls 


1516 


Male 




11 


Empty 


Oat hulls 


1518 


Male 




12 


Empty < 


Partly digested oats 


1519 


Male 




12 


Empty 


Oat hulls 


1520 


Male 




12 


390 oats 
19 wheat 


Partly digested oats 


249 


Male 


it 


12 


341 oats 
3 wheat 
1 unidentified 
seed 


Partly digested oats and hulls 


250 


Female 


it 


12 


Empty 


Oat hulls 


251 


Male 


ti 


12 


593 oats 
3 wheat 


Partly digested oats and hulls 


252 


Female 


a 


12 


Empty 


Oat hulls 



-The Oregon Sportsman. 



154 



THE GAME BREEDER 



GAME FARMING vs. COMMERCIAL FISHING. 

By Fred D. Hoyt. 



After many years of experimenting 
with the fish and game laws, in the great 
State of California, the year 1914 finds 
us as far from a solution of the question 
as in the beginning. That our laws have 
been beneficial, as to the conservation of 
the fish and game, no one will question ; 
but at the same time most of our law£ 
as passed have been for the benefit of 
the few, either for pleasure or profit, and 
against the great majority of the people. 

Why not make the fish and game laws 
an asset to the revejuie of the State? 

The Bowman Act as passed by the 
last Legislature provided for game farm- 
ing, or the raising of the different kinds 
of wild game, as found in the State, and 
many others that are not native; pro- 
vided that you first take out a yearly li- 
cense of twenty-five dollars, and pay 
three cents a tag for every bird sold on 
the market, thus deriving a revenue for 
the State on a business that costs the 
breeder from hundreds to thousands of 
dollars to launch and finance. He pavs 
about 2 per cent, taxes on this invest- 
ment, which is in sight to be assessed 
at all times, and with his twenty-five 
dollar yearly license and three cent bird 
tags, makes him pay pretty high inter- 
est on the investment and income. 

The Fish and Game Commission have 
been spending one half the revenue de- 
rived from the sale of hunting licenses 
for propagation and protection of the 
fish, running half a dozen hatcheries, 
many collecting stations and from the 
Sissons Hatchery alone in 1912, planted 
over six million salmon in the Sacra- 
mento river. From Mill Creek station 
eight and one-half millions, and from the 
Federal stations twenty-four million 
more were distributed. Striped bass, 
shad, and other fish have been imported 
and protected until now they form one 
of our most prolific food supplies. 

The State started, financed and main- 
tains this great fishing industry and is 
paying sixty or seventy thousand dol- 
lars a year, according to the 1912 printed 



report, for the benefit of a few million 
dollar corporations, and four thousand 
and five hundred men. Over half of this 
number are aliens and 90 per cent, of 
the balance had to be naturalized. This 
the State has been doing for many years 
and is still doing, making the sportsman 
with his hunting and fishing license pay 
for the making of million dollar corpor- 
ations and the support of 4,500 aliens, or 
near aliens, whose -only interest in the 
industry is "catcha the fish and getta de 
mon." Where will you find a business 
or factory, giving their output to any- 
one that comes along and picks them up. 
Yet this is what the State is doing. The 
Bowman Act allows a man to start in 
the business of game farming if he first 
obtains a license, which costs him twen- 
ty-five dollars a year, pays his own 
money for his equipment, raises his 
quail, pheasants, ducks, and other birds, 
and begs the privilege of paying the State 
three cents on every bird he sells. On 
the other hand we have the State, financ- 
ing the business of propagating, protect- 
ing, and importing the great food fish 
supply, which they have done very suc- 
cessfully, raising millions of pounds of 
fish for the consumption of the people 
and millions more which are exported 
to all parts of the world. They have been 
more than successful in maintaining this 
great industry, financed by the sports- 
man's money; but instead of making the 
fisherman pay something for the fish the 
State has raised, they give him the out- 
put of this great fish factory for the ask- 
ing, and then have to pay many deputies 
and run patrol boats to make him ob- 
serve the few laws governing the taking 
of fish. Surely if we can make laws 
making the game raiser pay so much a 
head for his birds, which he has paid 
for the raising of, we also can make 
laws making the fisherman pay so much 
for the fish which the State has raised. 
There are enough deputies employed 
by the Fish and Game Commsision to 
man an office in every place where fish 






THE GAME BREEDER 



165 



are landed and then leave plenty to do 
the outside work. Let the fish be handled 
by the commission, and the State derive 
so much a pound revenue, thereby mak- 
ing the business of raising fish by the 
State at least self-supporting and using 
the money contributed by the sportsman 
for the upbuilding of the sport. You 
make him pay a high rate on the small 
amount of game, and the few pounds of 
fish he catches on a day's vacation in the 
year. Were the sportsmen who take out 
about 150,000 licenses to get what their 
permits entitle them to shoot in one day 
there would not be enough game in the 
State of California to last a week, yet we 
raise fish for the alien, and let him catch 
as many as he can 365 days in the year, 
and if he catches so many that the price 
would be within reach of the poor man, 
he sends the over supply to the glue 
factory for two cents a pound, so he may 
get 20 cents per pound for the balance. 
\\ hen there is an over supply of pota- 
toes the poor man lays in a supply at 25 
or 35 cents a sack, or even takes them 
away for nothing to save dumping them 
into the bay. When there is an over 
abundance of fish the poor man pays 20 
cents a pound just the same and the 
chicken raiser buys fish scrap for 3y? 
cents. This may be all right for the 
chicken, but it don't make any differ- 
ence in price to the consumer of eggs 
and fish. Germany settled the food fish 
question by sending out government 
boats and going into the fishing business. 
Last year the fish, lobsters, scallops, 
clams and sardines caught in the State 
of Maine were valued at $8,000,000. 
Over 200,000,000 pounds of fish, includ- 
ing shell fish, were taken in this State. 
-Had the State of Maine received the 
small rate of l /i cent a pound on the 
entire catch it would more than pay 
all the expenses of its Fish and Game 
Commission. The salmon which with the 
help of the U. S. Government we are 
propagating by the millions, is the most 
abundant, and with the help of other 
fish, wholly within the jurisdiction of 
the State, would at l / 2 cent a pound more 
than pay all the expenses of this great 
industry. We have tried giving these 
aliens our fish for nothing, and the price 



of salmon has steadily advanced until 
now 20 cents a pound is the price, while 
at the same time you can buy a pound 
of California salmon that has gone 
through the process of cleaning, cooking 
and canning for 10 cents retail. Our 
herring, clams, sardines and crabs are 
rated the same way. Surely the price 
of fresh fish would not be changed if we 
made aliens and big corporations pay for 
the running of the fish factory. It would 
work no hardship on the fisherman; if 
he caught no fish he would have no rev- 
enue to pay, if he caught a lot he ought 
to be more than glad to pay for his luck. 
It is only justice to the people of the 
State that the men who are reaping the 
money from the industry should pay the 
expense of maintaining it. 

The State of Minnesota owns and 
controls all the water power within its 
border, improves and maintains the 
same, deriving its greatest source of 
revenue from its sale. If all the fish 
propagated by the State and caught 
by the fishermen were handled through 
the Fish and Game Commission at so 
much per pound, besides being a great 
source of revenue, would give the com- 
mon people, when there was an over 
catch of fish, a chance of eating them 
instead of their being consumed by the 
glue factory and the chickens. 

As the Bowman Act makes the Com- 
mission practically handle the game 
farming industry, so should the people 
of the State make the Commission han- 
dle the fish industry, and they who have 
made such a success in the propagation 
of our food and game fish, can surely 
make it financially self-supporting and 
an asset to the State. That this state 
of affairs is in no way the fault of 
the Fish and Game Commission, must 
be truly admitted. They are but carry- 
ing out the Fish and Game laws, as 
made by our legislators. 

This article summed up gives us the 
following results. The sportsmen, nine- 
ty per cent, of whom are native born 
citizens of the United States, with their 
bunting and fishing licenses paying into 
the State many thousand dollars to main- 
tain and protect the fishing industry, 
which is controlled by a few rich cor- 



156 



THE GAME BREEDER 



porations, and carried on by a bunch of 
people, 50 per cent, aliens and at least 
90 per cent, of foreign birth, for which 
they pay $25,000 a year to sell to the 
State at a high price the fish that the 
State has produced. In other words, 
the State is receiving $25,000 for some- 
thing that costs it many times that 
amount to produce. 

The State with its Bowman Act de- 
rives a revenue from the game farming 
and domestic fish culture business, and 
that same State propagates and protects 
millions of fish to give away to the com- 
mercial fisherman. The State in 1913 
planted over fifty million salmon in Cali- 
fornian streams. The state in the same 
year paid 20 cents a pound for millions 
of salmon that they had themselves 
propagated. The State, with the sports- 
man's money, planted the fish for the 
commercial fisherman, the State making 
the sportsman plant the fish for sport 
fishing. 

Let the people through the initiative, _ 
which, thanks to the present administra- 
tion we have, pass the following laws, 
and the Fish and Game Commission, who 
have so successfully solved our food fish 
supply, if given that power, will just as 
successfully put the business on a solid 
financial basis : 

1. That the money derived for the 
sale of licenses be placed in three funds, 
namely, hunting, sport fishing, and com- 
mercial fishing, and the money collected 
placed in the fund, and used only for 
the purpose for which it was paid. 

2. That the Fish and Game Commis- 
sion shall collect enough revenue from 
the commercial fisherman to make it self- 
supporting, and an asset to the State. 

3. That it is a misdemeanor to sell 
food fish in good condition for other 
purposes than for human consumption. 

4. That a willful violation of any of 
the fish and game laws carry with it the 
forfeiture of license. 

— Hayward Journal 



Subscribe for The Game Breeder. 
Our slogan is "More Game and Fewer 
Game Laws." 



Some Fun in the Michigan Law. 

William R. Oates, State Game War- 
den of Michigan, writing to one of the 
readers of The Game Breeder says : 
Dear Madam : — 

We are in receipt of your letter of recent 
date, asking for a permit to sell blue quail. 
We are enclosing permit for that purpose, 
herewith. 

I also note what you say about the Indiana 
law which has been passed recently, a copy of 
which you enclose in your letter. From our 
theory of the situation this would not be a 
proper law to pass in Michigan. If we are to 
propagate pheasants and other birds in an en- 
closure and afterward liberate them in a field 
as a game bird, we must have some protection 
by which these birds can be looked after in 
the future. If people were permitted to raise 
them in captivity and handle them in any way 
they see fit, there would be no way of pro- 
tecting the wild bird, and until our people 
are educated a little more along the line of 
wild things the temptation would be too great 
to give them as broad and liberal a law as 
the one which the people of Indiana have 
recently passed. 

The Indiana law certainly is an im- 
provement on the Michigan law, if we 
understand the last named. Farmers 
Bulletin 692 informs us that deer raised 
"in captivity" (in Michigan) may be 
killed at any time for owner's consump- 
tion. If Michigan has game officers 
similar to those in New York who ar- 
rested a man for eating a grouse sent by 
a friend in Scotland, they no doubt 
would arrest the owner's wife if she took 
a slice of the venison. The law seems a 
little narrow when compared with the 
Indiana law sent to the Sate Warden by 
Miss Helen Bartlett. 

By the same bulletin we are informed 
that game raised "in captivity" may be 
sold alive within the State (Michigan) 
and "under a $1.00 permit alive or dead 
without the State." The statement 
would seem to indicate that the Michi- 
ganders are required to eat their quail 
alive. If this be the situation the India- 
na folk will have a right to say : Goosey I 
Michigander !" 

Another gem in the Michigan law 
(same Bulletin 692), is this: "Land 
owners and members of clubs owning- 
game preserves may take out as hand 
baggage, during open season, under a $10 
permit from State Warden, 20 ducks or 






THE GAME BREEDER 157 

other migratory birds killed by them on killed at so early a date. We found in 

their own premises." many sections of the State that the fawns 

We think it would be cheaper to raise were not weaned or able to take care of 

a few migrants in Indiana where game themselves until as late as October, that 

"in captivity" in exempt from all game the does were poor and the weather so 

law "foolishness" as Mr. Talbot would hot that to permit them to be hunted 

say. with dogs simply brought about a use- 

*"• less destruction of this species we are so 

A New Deer Law for Louisiana. anxious to protect. 

After a consultation with the leading "The commission believes that no deer 

sportsmen and conservationists of the should be permitted to be hunted m the 

State, President M. L. Alexander, of the State before the first of October but, in 

Conservation Commission of Louisiana, a desire to meet the wishes of certain 

has announced the new regulations just sportsmen m the State, we decided to 

passed by his board in respect to the permit still hunting from September 15th 

killing of deer. to October 15th, and general . hunting 

The open season is set from Septem- with dogs from October 15th to January 
ber 15th to January 5th, of each year. 5th. The first five days in January were 
Does are protected until Oct. 15. Still allowed so as to permit sportsmen to en- 
bunting, for bucks only, and without the gage in a New Year's Day Hunt, 
use of dogs, is allowed between the 15th "To succeed in bringing about an m- 
of September and the 15th of October, crease of the deer of Louisiana many 
Bucks and does are allowed to be taken appreciable way, the Conservation Lom- 
and killed and hunted with dogs from mission realizes that it will be necessary 
the 15th of October until the 5th of Tan- to put such restrictions on their hunting 
nary. The new law provides that no so as to make it hard rather than easy 
deer shall be killed for sale, offered for to kill them." t 
sale, or had in possession for sale at any 

time. It allows one person to take five Rabbits. 

such wild deer in an open season and to We are glad to observe that the clubs 

possess but two carcasses or parts there- and preserves are taking our advice to 

of at one time. turn down rabbits. There can be no 

The new law does not affect the pre- doubt about the fact that rabbits are a 

vious laws that prohibit the killing of protection to the more valuable game 

wild deer between the hours of sunset birds. They will furnish some good 

and sunrise; or when in the water; or sport for those who have beagles. A day 

when driven to high land by high water with the merry beagles always provides a 

or overflow ; or the use of guns that pleasing diversion on any shoot. Mr. 

have any device for deadening the sound Lucas, who advertises rabbits, guarantees 

of the explosion, commonly known as a live arrival, 
"silencer." The snaring or trapping of 

wild deer is also prohibited, and fawns Night Law School Suggested. 

ar ^, 0t all , owe( 2 t0 be killed at any time The following newspaper clipping was 

There has been such a difference of sent tQ The Game Breeder by a reader, 

opinion as to the season in which deer ^ m knQw the name of the paper; dear 

should be permitted to be killed that reade when send g0od things for 

the question of adjusting the season so blicat ' ion . We wish to give credit: 

as to protect the deer has been one of This year more than ever there is nee d for 

the hard problems for the commission to the sportsman to take a course at a night law 

decide," said President Alexander. school before he sets out to bag duck along 

"Our experience of last year in per- the shore or to trail the big game in the 

mit-tintr flip QMQnn-tn nnm Anmnf 1 fttVi northern woods. More than 240 new game 

nutting the season to open August lMn , aws were enacted bv the legislatures of 1915, 

forcibly demonstrated to the commission no f ewer tnan forty states passing new laws 

that no deer should be permitted to be or revising old ones. 



158 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T 1 ?? Game Breeder 



Published Monthly 



Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 



NEW YORK, FEBRUARY, 1916 



TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy— $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, $ 1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc., 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotto, Treasurer, 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary 
Telephone, Beekman 3685. 



AN END TO FOOLISHNESS. 

One of our readers, sending an ad- 
vertisement of live game for sale says: 
"I have spent on game protection in the 
last six years not less than $10,000 — ■ 
most of it foolishly as I see it now, and 
your paper opened my eyes. 1 now want 
an outlet for my surplus game and wish 
to help create an interest in game breed- 
ing." 

How well the foregoing fits in with 
the memorable oft-quoted statement of 
the Dean of Sportsmen, "Truly we need 
a revolution of thought and a revival of 
common sense." 



regulations, breeders should, of course, 
sell live quail and all other game at all 
times for propagation, and during long 
open seasons as food. 

Game rapidly is becoming abundant in 
many parts of the country where good 
game breeding laws have been enacted. 
The people evidently are fond of game 
to eat, pay good prices for it. and be- 
come friendly to the sport which often 
produces the food. The money paid for 
the game is' used to produce more game. 



BIRDS FOR PROPAGATION. 

Members of the Game Conservation 
Society and readers of The Game Breed- 
er should see that all new game breeders 
laws contain a provision that breeders 
be permitted to trap live birds for prop- 
agation. They should be permitted to 
take live birds instead of shooting the 
same number. How absurd it seems to 
permit any one who pays a dollar for a 
shooting license to shoot 25 or some other 
number of birds per diem and to refuse 
the breeders the right to save a similar 
number of birds for breeding purposes ! 

All game breeders laws should be 
amended so as to permit licensed breed- 
ers to trap any game on their places for 
propagation purposes. Under proper 



MONEY IN PRAIRIE CHICKENS. 

Many of the prairie States now per- 
mit the profitable breeding of prairie 
chickens. The birds sell readily at from 
$10 to $20 per pair. They can be reared 
on protected farms much cheaper than 
ordinary poultry, provided proper grass 
covers and foods, wild sunflowers and 
others be planted. Prairie chicken eggs 
are worth $1 each. No doubt the birds 
will persist in laying if a few eggs be 
taken from the nests. We will send 
some substantial orders for a big lot of 
prairie chickens and eggs to any farmer 
who will offer them for sale. It should 
be an easy matter to make $5,000 or $10,- 
000 a year on a good big farm or ranch, 
simply by killing the hawks, crows, 
snakes and other vermin and by trapping 
the chickens and selling them alive. 

The Game Breeder will tell any farm- 
er or farmer's boy how he can make a 
lot of money with prairie chickens. 



THE ANNUAL OUTRAGE. 

Outrage is a mild term to apply to the 
performance required by the New York 
game laws. Reputable citizens who are 
engaged in breeding game birds, a ran >st 
desirable food, are arrested as they re- 
turn home because they have their prop- 
erty in their possession. The game is 
seized and officers say they give it to 
hospitals. Jail threats are made and the 
citizens settle, paying good sums of 
money, about what the banditti, operat- 
ing in the name of the law. think they 
will stand in each case. We have rec- 
ords where the monev demanded was 



THE GAME BREEDER 



159 



far more than the fines imposed for real 
crimes. 

There is a better way. The State 
Game Department should have the right 
to issue permits to all game breeders 
in other States giving them the right to 
sell the game they produce in the New 
York market, when .properly identified. 
Permits should also be issued to sports- 
men returning home with game legally 
taken in other States. Any one of the 
people recently held up easily could show 
that the game was taken legally. Legal 
nonsense has been rampant long enough ! 



CORRESPONDENCE. 

Game Breeder : 

I have sold all of my ducks that I 
wish to sell. Your paper must have a 
large circulation for I received letters 
from all over the country, sometimes two 
or three in one day, asking the price of 
wood ducks and mallards. 

Glenn Chapman. 

Connecticut. 

Editor Game Breeder: 
^ I have now read two issues of The 
Game Breeder and to say that I am 
pleased with it is putting' it mildly. I 
am entirely in accord with your views 
and hope the day is not far off when 
they will be carried out all over the 
United States. 

G. D. Can field. 
South Carolina. 

Game Dinner Echoes. 
Editor Game Breeder: 

I thoroughly enjoyed every moment 
of the game dinner at the Astor. Not 
only was the provender of peculiar ex- 
cellence but the whole trend of the 
speechmaking was of a whole lot of 
value to me as I am. as you know, deeply 
interested in the subject of game propa- 
gation. 

You have my deepest thanks for your 
courtesy in persuading me to attend' this 
exceptional gathering and I want to say 
that the character of the attendance 
spoke even more strongly than the ex- 
cellent speeches for the strength of the 



movement which you have so efficiently 
fostered. 

Sincerely, 

T. L. Briggs, 
Advertising Manager 
Remington Arms-Union Metallic 
Cartridge Co. 

Mr. A. A. Hill, 

Vice-President Game Conservation 
Society : 

After having partaken of a very en- 
joyable dinner of the Society on Dec. 14 
last, and having heard the objects of the 
Society outlined in the speech of several 
speakers, I find that I am heartily in 
sympathy with the movement, and would 
like to become more closely associated 
with it. 

I would be pleased, therefore, to have 
you send me such information as you 
may have, so that I may make proper 
application for membership in the Game 
Conservation Society. 

Yours truly, 
New York. R. B. 

[This and other similar letters are gratify- 
ing. We are glad always to have the work 
of the Society appreciated. Contributing mem- 
bers pay $5.00 per year; life members $100.00. 
Subscribing members pay $1.00 per year. 
Money received from contributing members and 
life members is used in our efforts to reform 
the game laws. — Editor.] . 

Editor Game Breeder : 

It was my good fortune to have at- 
tended the dinner of the Game Consei na- 
tion Society at the Hotel Astor, Dec. 14. 

I have formed many new ideas re- 
garding the protection of game and am 
very much impressed with the new work 
of producing "more game." 

I am to address a sportsmen's club 
and wish that you would kindly mail me 
a copy of the census report which you 
read at the dinner, also the story of the 
"turkey deal." C. S. Rogers. 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

[The story of the "turke\ deal" (will 
named, it was raw) is as follows: Many 
members of the Game Conservation Soci< I 
now own and produce an abundance of w 
turkeys for sport. Some were donated for tin 
dinner by their owners. A suggestion un- 
made that possibly there rhighl be some "ft 
law in New York which would prevent out 



160 



THE GAME BREEDER 



eating such food. The matter was referred 
to the State Game Department. A "fool" 
statute was discovered which protects birds 
related to New York game. The turkey has 
been extinct in the State for many_ years, but 
it is said to be related to the quail, and the 
department was unwilling to have the food 
served, so we dropped it from the bill of fare, 
substituting turkeys not quite so wild or so 
good to eat as those donated. The Game 
Census figures indicate that members of the 
Game Conservation Society now own about 
an hundred thousand game birds and they will 
have over a million within the year, using very 
little ground for their industry. There is room 
enough in America for every one who wishes 
to do so to have an abundance of game so he 
can shoot for six months every year, provided 
it be lawful to breed all species. — Editor.] 

Editor Game Breeder : 

The Game Breeder is a source of 
great enjoyment to me and I would like 
to suggest that you publish a list of 
"Dont's," for the amateur gamekeeper 
as a prevention of a great amount of 
trouble and loss. 

Ohio. J. B. Foote. 



Our Game Law. 

We were glad to see the following let- 
ter from the New York Conservation 
Commissioner in the New York Sun. 
We did not believe it possible that Mr. 
Pratt would favor the performances 
complained of. We do not believe he 
will favor the prevention of the sale in 
New York of food produced by indus- 
try in other States so long as similar 
food produced in foreign countries and 
similar food produced in New York is 
sold in the New York markets. — Editor. 

To the Editor of The Evening Sun — Sir: 
Your article of January 11 entitled "The An- 
nual Game Law Outrage," has been called to 
my attention and I write to say that I heartily 
agree with your findings. 

This law was drafted when the "Non-sale 
of Game Law" in New York State first went 
into effect and when it was very necessary^ to 
throw the strictest safeguards about the im- 
portation of game. It was hard for the public 
at large and many sportsmen to appreciate that 
wild game cannot exist on a commercial basis ; 
and in many cases it was necessary that the 



WILD COTTON-TAIL RABBITS 

WILLIAM A. LUCAS, Naturalist, W00DHAVEN, L. L, N. Y. 

I offer for immediate delivery 3000 Northern Cotton-Tail Rabbits. Legal 
animals for restocking State Game- Refuges and Game Preserves. 

I guarantee rabbits to be in prime condition. Live arrival guaranteed. 
Order now for sure delivery, Correspondence invited. 

I offer also a fine lot of Ring-Necked Pheasants of prime quality for 
breeding purposes ; Bob-White Quail ; Wild Turkeys ; Reeves Pheasants ; 
Golden Pheasants ; Lady Amherst Pheasants ; China Ring-Necked Pheasants 
and Mongolian cross breeds. I also carry a full line of ornamental Land and 
Water Fowl. Order now for sure delivery. 

"Grey Wild Mallard Ducks a Specialty" 

Although my prices are higher than those of some competitors, I, however, 
deliver nothing that is not of prime quality, my expenses are therefore high, 
but my buyers have certain and good results. 



WILLIAM A. LUCAS 



W00DHAVEN, L I., NEW YORK 



THE GAME BREEDER 



161 



honest sportsmen should suffer certain restric- 
tions that seem now unreasonable. 

It is the intention of the present commission 
to use every effort to have this law amended so 
that hunters who take game lawfully in other 
States may bring it into New York State at 
any time, provided the game be accompanied 
by the taker, who shall have procured from 
the commission an importation license. 

We must protect the game of New York 
State, and the original law was properly drawn 
in order to protect it under the circumstances 
which then existed. The commission is doing 
everything to see that laws such as this are 



corrected, that there may be no unnecessary 
hardchip on the honest sportsman. 

George D. Pratt, 
Conservation Commissioner. 
Albany, N. Y., January 18. 



Downtown — Here comes Blinkers. 
He's got a new baby, and he'll talk us to 
death. 

Uptown — Well, here comes a neighbor 
of mine who has a new setter dog. Let's 
introduce them to their fate. — Life. 



THE PORTAGE HEIGHTS GAME FARM 



i[ROBERTjJ. McPHAIL, Head Keeper ,j 

Ring-Necked Pheasants Eggs For Sale 

^SP PRICES: 
For delivery prior to May 1 5, $25.00 per hundred m&mt For delivery after May 15, $20.00 per hundred 

$3.00 per dozen 

All our pheasant hens are mated with imported cocks. 



J. R. GAMMETER, 



Portage Heights, Akron, Ohio 



Wild Turkey Eggs 

EARLY EGGS, $15.00 per dozen 
Later, $12.00 per dozen 

These eggs are from true Wild Turkeys. Orders 
will be filled in the order in which they are received. 
Early orders for two or more dozen eggs will be ac- 
cepted at the rate of $12.50 per dozen. I also have a 
few extra fine gobblers for sale, write for prices. 

MARY C. WILKIE 



BEAVERDAM 



VIRGINIA 



162 



THE GAME BREEDER 



STONY LONESOME GAME EARM 

Mallard Ducks and 
Mongolian Pheasants 

We offer for immediate delivery (limited number) of 

Mallard Ducks and Mongolian Pheasants 

and will take orders for eggs, delivery in the spring. 

ADDRESS — 

129 Pront Street, New York City, 

or JOHN FOSTER, West Hartland, Connecticut 



PHEASANTS 

EXTRA SELECTED 
BROOD STOCK 



RINGNECK COCKS, 
RINGNECK HENS, 
MONGOLIAN COCKS, - 



- $2.50 

- 3.00 

- 5.00 



Also a few MALLARDS for 
Breeding. Pair, $5.00 



We are Booking Orders for 
Eggs for Spring Delivery 



RIVER LAWN FARM 

Ralph H. Sidway 

2 1 Franklin St., Buffalo, N. Y. 



NOW IS THE TIME 

If you expect to have fertile eggs next Spring, 
to buy your Birds ; don't wait until midwinter or 
next spring ; you will be disappointed. 

We Offer For Immediate Delivery. 

Silver, Goldens, Ringnecks, Lady Amhursts< 
Reeves, Elliotts, Mongo.ians,Swinhoes,Versicolors> 
Impeyans, Manchurian Eared and Melanotus 
Pheasants. We are now booking orders for eggs 
for Spring and Summer delivery of any of the above 
varieties. We quote Ringneck eggs $3.50 per 
dozen, $25.00 per hundred ; Green head mallard 
eggs $3.50 per dozen, $25.00 per hundred. We also 
offer for sale Single Comb Buff and Blue Orping- 
tons, Rhode Island Reds, Japanese Silkies and 
Longtails, Wild Turkeys, Blue, White Japanned and 
Specifier Peafowls, as well as the following Ducks : 
Greenhead and black mallard, pintail, redhead, 
gadwall, wood, mandarin and F-ormosan teal, 
shovelers, baldpate and Blue Bill and green wing 
teal. 

WANTED 

White Peahens. In Pheasants, any of the 
tragopans, firebacks, cheer, sommering. Elliotts, 
white crested Kalij, Peacocks. Anderson's Lineatus. 
Also Garganey and ring teal. In writing quote 
number, sex and lowest cash price. 

Send 30 cents in stamps for our new 1916 color- 
type catalogue of pheasants and rearing of pheas- 
ants. If you do not like it return in 48 hours after 
receiving, and your money refunded ; and if you 
make a purchase of us to the amount of $5.00 you 
can deduct price of catalogue. 



CHILES & 

Mount Sterling:, 



CO. 

Kentucky 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



163 








Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Hungarian Partridges 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders 
for these birds and for years I have filled 
practically all of the large State orders for both 
'•vJ^S civ - '^^ Partridges and Pheasants. 

Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck, Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners 

I oarry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 best 
Royal Swans of England. I have fine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS, CRANES. PRAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have 60 acres 
•f land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER. LLAMAS. RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere— it will pay you to do so. Your visit solicited. 
I am only 60 miles from New York and 80 miles from Philadelphia. 




Department V. 



WM. J. MACKENSEN 

YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "You's for More Game." 



164 



THE GAME BREEDER 




Wild Water Fowl 

"Our Specialties." 

Wood Duck-, Mandarins Wild Black 
Mallards for stocking game preserves. 
Safe delivery guarantee!. 500 Can- 
ada Wild Geese, $8.00 to $10.00 per 
pair. Australian, Soulh American, 
Carolina Swans. 200 trained English 
Decoy Ducks, guaranteed Callers and 
Breeders, $5.00 per pair. Egys, 15 for 
$2.00. Mallards and Canada Geese 
must be bought NOW to breed this 
Spring. For prices of other wild fowl 
apply to 

WHEALTON WILD WATER-FOWL FARMS 
Chincoteague Island, Virginia 




The Best in 
Pointers 

Puppies, Broken Dogs 
and Brood Bitches, by 
Champion' Comanche 
Frank, Fishel's Frank 
and Champion Nicholas 
R. 

Write me your wants, please- 

U. R. FISHEL 
Box 35 HOPE, IND. 



M. G. and F. G. L, 

Can you guess it? 



Hatching Results from 

Terrell's 
Wild Mallard Eggs 

Will Please You 




Early Eggs Are Best 

ORDER NOW 

Early Eggs from High Class Birds 

$3.50 per setting (13) 
$25 per hundred 

CLYDE B. TERRELL 

Naturalist 
OSMKOSH WISCONSIN 



Game Birds 

I am offering for immediate delivery 
the following hand-reared birds. These 
birds are in every way extra choice, being 
thoroughly acclimated, requiring no 
housing in the winter and most desirable 
for breeding in the coming Spring. 

Genuine WILD Mallard ducks $5.00 per pair 

Decoy Mallards 3.00 " " 

Wood duck 16.00 " *' 

Mated Canadian geese 10.00 " 

Also Pintails, Black duck, Widgeon, 
Red-heads, Blue-bills. Green- and Blue- 
Winged Teal, etc., and several varieties 
of Wild Geese. 

RING NECK Pheasants $5.50 per pair 

Golden Pheasants 15.00 '* " 

Also Silver, Amherst, Reeves Pheas- 
ants and Common Bantams for pheasant 
rearing. 

Safe Delivery Guaranteed. 

JOHN HEYWOOD 
Box B Gardner, Mass. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



165 




Midwinter Fun 
with a Scatter Gun 



Don't hibernate. Don't be a bear. Start the New Year right. 
Get a gun and get out in the open. Fill your lungs full of the 
crisp healthy air. Develop your arms, your eye and your aim. Get 
your share of the sport of sports. Try your skill with the frisky 
clay pigeons. Begin 

TRAPSHOOTING 

Trapshooting is a real man's game filled with vigor, vim and 
exhilaration. Bvery target holds a challenge to your skill and judg- 
ment. And every shot jnst makes you crave for more. 

Join your local gun club now. Get in the game. If a club's 
not handy get a 



OUPDNp Hand Trap 



Its tantalizing targets will give you sport galore. John B. 
Burnham says it's great practice for both experts and beginners and 
develops crack field shots. $4.00 at your dealer's. If he can't supply 
you, send it prepaid anywhere in the United States upon receipt of price. 

Write for booklets, "The Sport Alluring," and 
"The Du Pont Hand Trap, No. 354." 

E. I. Du Pont de Nemours & Company 

DELAWARE 



WILMINGTON 



ESTABLISHED 1802 

Pioneer Powder Makers of America 



166 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Blue -Winged Teal — Green -Winged Teal 
and Other Wild Fowl 

For Sale, for stocking purposes only, a fine lot 
of Blue-winged and Green-winged Teal ; also a few 
pin-tailed ducks and some wild bred mallards. These 
are legal birds, shipped with State Permit. They 
are exempt from game law restrictions and they can 
be shipped safely to all parts of the United States 
where game breeding is legal or where it is legal to 
have live birds in possession. 

For particulars and prices, write to 

GAME PRESERVER, Care of The Game Breeder 

150 Nassau Street New York, N. Y. 



Pheasants, All Species 

Peacocks and White 

African Guineas 

For Sale 



For prices, address 

JOHN TALBOT 

South Bend Indiana 



/ will purchase Amherst and Reeves 
Pheasants and Pea Fowl. 



Established 1860 



Telephone 4569 Spring 



FRED SAUTER 

LEADING TAXIDERMIST 
OF AMERICA 

42 Bleecker St., New York City 

Corner Lafayette Street 

Subway Station at the Door 



Specialist in all Branches 
of Taxidermy 



Write for Illustrated Catalogue 



THE GAME BREEDER 



167 



All the Wild Game 
You Want 

FOR many years we in America have spent much 
time bemoaning the disappearance of our feath- 
ered game. But the fact that we have little game 
to shoot and little to eat is due solely to our own lack 
of initiative. We should have an abundance of game 
in the fields and on the market. We may obtain such 
an abundance by creating a supply equal to the de- 
mand. This can be done by increasing nature's out- 
put through game farming. And moreover, the de- 
mand may be much greater than at present, and still 
be easily met. 

We have the land available to make America the 
greatest game producing country in the world. Uti- 
lize it, and everyone will have more opportunities to 
indulge in field sports. There will be more shoot- 
ing for all of us, whether or not we have access to a 
preserve, because game that is raised for sporting 
purposes can not be confined in any restricted area. 
Wherever game is intensively cultivated, we find 
improved shooting in all the surrounding territory. 

To anyone who has a small amount of land, game farm- 
ing- will prove profitable. The demand for eggs and for 
breeding stock is much greater than the supply, and will be 
for years to come. Pheasant eggs sell today at from $20 to 
$25 a hundred. Live birds bring from $5 to $7 a pair. 

To those who own large acreage, game farming will either 
provide sport, or profit from those who will pay for the sport. 

To the city man, it opens the possibility of enjoying good 
hunting near home. 

To everyone who shoots, it will bring increased pleasure 
afield. 

Game farming means an addition to our food supply that 
will be welcome to all. 

But this subject is too big to be properly treated in th 
Write for the book, "Game Farming for Profit and Pleasure," which 
will be sent to you without cost. It tells of the subject in a most in- 
teresting and informative manner. Fill out the coupon below and a 
copy will be mailed you at once. 

Game Breeding Department, Room 201 

HERCULES POWDER CO 

Manufacturers of Explosives; Infallible and "E.C." Smokeless Shotgun Powders; L. & R. Orange 
Extra Black Sporting; Powder; Dy.iamite for Farming. 

Wilmington, Delaware 



Game Breeding Department, Room 201, 

Hercules Powder Company, Wilmington, Del. 

Gentlemen: — Please send me a copy of Game Farming for Profit 
and Pleasure. I am interested in game breeding from the 



ste^-iv 



Wm 



St' 



Ring-Necked 
Pheasant. 

First imported 

from China m. 

1881. Now bein^ 
bred in fairly 
. lar^e numbers 



i.l>! 





168 



THE GAME BREEDER 



r 



"\ 



REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 



Beautiful Farm 

Plainfield, Hampshire County, Mass. 

Suitable for Game Farm or 
Preserve — at Villa View, a noted 
Summer Resort for 30 years. 
Fifteen miles North of Williams- 
burg. 

tgr* Jr^ *5^ 

Trout Ponds and Trout Streams 

Orchards bearing a great variety 

of Fruits — Berries abundant 

^3" ^" v^ 

Excellent Farm and Wood- 
lands, House, including Furni- 
ture, Barns, Ice Houses, Hen Houses, Carriage Houses. 

HORSES /. COWS 
SWINE IMPLEMENTS 

JAMES F. GURNEY, Owner 

Care GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, New York City 




The above is an old stamping ground of The Dean of American 
Sportsmen, Charles Hallock, who says it will make a most desirable 
shooting box for some reader of The Game Breeder. — Editor. 



V 



J 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or stg-n your letters: "Yours for More Game.* 



•'i^wr- - 



■■;: / ■'■'■"r --■" :■- 



- v./ 1 - : I: ■:;- 1 • 





Metallics 



The Modern 
Arms and Ammunition 
of American Sportsmen 

HERE are the four leaders in the Sporting Arms 
business in this country today. 

Undoubtedly there are other good guns. But the 
feeling among sportsmen seems to be that if a rifle or 
gun is not a Remingion-UMC it is not a modern sport- 
ing arm. 

And as to Ammunition, no matter what make of arms 
a sportsman may own he is likely to be a stickler for 
Remington- UMC Ammunition. 

You may be one of the millions of American Sportsmen 
who are using Remington-UMC arms and ammunition — 
if so, then you knoiv. 

And you undoubtedly know many other sportsmen who 
are as strong for Remington-UMC as you are yourself. 

In your community, there is at least one of the 80,000 
dealers who are featuring Remington-UMC — and you 
know him and he knows you. He knows what you 
want, and he probably has also a very good under- 
standing of Tvhy you want Remington-UMC Arms 
and Ammunition. 

That Red Ball Mark of Remington-UMC on his 
store is his Sign and yours that he is Sports- 
men's Headquarters. 

The Remington Arms Union 
Metallic Cartridge Co., Inc. 

Woolworth Building 

NEW YORK 




y«c 



U.S. PAf. 



S* Y 



ShotShefls 




< .- 




r n 



Anyone can hatch pheasant chicks, but it takes 
experience to rear them successfully. 



DO YOU KNOW THE VALUE OF 

SPRATTS 

Pheasant Meals Nos. 5 & 12 

AND 

CHICGRAIN 

These foods are used by the 
leading Game Breeders through- 
out the world and there is noth- 
ing on the market that can take 
their place. 

If your dealer cannot supply 
you, write to us for prices and 
further particulars. 

Send 2c. stamp for " Dog Culture," 10c. for " Poultry Culture," 
and 25c. for " Pheasant Culture." 




SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED 

NEWARK, N. J. 

San Francisco St. Louis Cleveland Montreal 



L. 



MAtf 12 1921 



f>loo perYear 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliuillliiillliiliilir-s 



Single Copi es IO C. 

'»""' iiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim iiiiiuii 



TH& 



Q AH E DUEEDEK 



VOL. VIII. 



■T%ir*i-? 






. , .^ *«*, 



MARCH, 1916 



No. 6 



The- Object op this magazine- is 

to Make- North America the- 5iggest 

.Game Producing Country in the World 



v**~ 



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^' 



.«*^l 



HAND-REARED MALLLARDS. 



iMimi 



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Ji\ 



PUBLISHED BY 



m 



THE GAME CONSERVATION SOCIETY. Inc. 



JEW YORK CITY U.S.A 



'JJ**<"J -'S 



MMMiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiHiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiniiMiiiiiNiiiiinmiMiinminMiiMiiiMiimiiiiiiMiiiMiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiimmiifiK 



ARE YOU INTERESTED 
IN .22 CALIBRE RIFLES? 

Here are a few of the 

Remjiftton, 

.22 calibre single shot, repeating and autoloading rifles that won the Grand 
Prize for Modern Firearms at the Panama-Pacific Exposition. 




Gallery Special," Model No. 12B. 




Autoloading, Model No. 16A. Standard Grade. 




Military Model, Single Shot, No. 4S. 




Repeating Rifle, Model No. 12A. Standard Grade. 



The critical sportsman selects his rifle for results. He wants accuracy and depend- 
ability — also beauty of lines. All of these are embodied in the solid breech of Remington 
UMC firearms. 

The Remington UMC Dealer in your town is the man to go to. He knows what's 
happening in the sport today. You'll know him by the Red Ball Mark of Remington UMC— 
and his store is Sportsman's Headquarters. Send for firearms catalogue. 

The Remington-Arms Union Metallic Cartridge Co. 

WOOL WORTH BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY 



THE GAME BREEDER 



160 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



Announcements inserted under this head in small type for 2 cents per word. 
If displayed in heavy type, 5 cents per word. No advertisement accepted for less 
than 30 cents. Postage stamps accepted in payment. 

THE GAME BREEDER 



150 Nassau Street 



New York City 



LIVE GAME 



PHEASANT AND JAPANESE PHOEVIX FOWL 
Eggs for sale: several varieties. S V. REEVES, 114 
E. Park Ave., Haddonfield, N. J. 

QUAIL, PARTRIDGES, WILD FOWL, DEER AND 
other animals. S.ee display advertisement in this issue. 
WM. J. MACKENSEN, Proprietor Pennsylvania Pheas- 
antry and Game Park. 

CANADA WILD GEESE AND THEIR GOSLINGS— 
A limited number for sale now — the surest way to start 
breeding this species. We are the oldest and largest 
breeders of Canadas in this country. Black and White 
Swans.Wild Duoks, etc., for sale. WHEALTON WATER 
FOWL FARMS, Chincoteague Island. Va. 

WILD TURKEYS— For prices see display advertisement 
in this issue. W. J. MACKENSEN, Yardley, Bucks 
County, Pa. 

FOR SALE — Pheasants and eggs. Everything in the 
pheasant family. Pamphlet with order free. BUCK- 
WOOD PHEASANTRIES, Dunfield, Warren Co., New 
Jersey. (iot) 

BRED FEMALE MINK, SKUNKS, FOXES, OPOS- 
SUMS Pigeons, dogs. Particulars free. TARMAN, 
Box G, Quincy, Penna. 

k 

FOR SALE BUFFALO AND ELK IN CAR LOAD 
lots or single. Deer, Antelope, Beaver, Mink, Mountain 
Lion, Pheasants and Game Birds. Eggs in season. 
KENDRICK PHEASANTRIES, Coronado Building, 
Denver, Colorado. 7-16 

FOR SALE- WILD MALLARD DUCKS. $1.25 EACH, 
3 for $3.50. Eggs for sale in season. A. J. APPLEBY, 
Mgr., Cherry Farm, Chester, N. J. 

5 VARIETIES OF PHEASANTS. Wild Mallards, 
Wild Geese and game. Fourteen varieties of stand- 
ard Poultry, including Turkeys. Also Elk. List free. 
G. H. HARRIS, Taylorville, 111. 

GOLDEN AND ENGLISH RINGNECK PHEASANT 

eggs for hatching. May to August W S.ALLISON, 

Merrimacport, Mass. 7-16 



DEER FOR SALE 
Seven Tame Northern Wisconsin Deer Bucks and 
Does. $25 00 each. F. FERRON, 416 Wisconsin 
Avenue, Oak Park, Illinois. 



PURE BRED WILD WATERFOWL AT FOLLOW- 
ing prices: Mallards, $3.00 per pair. Pintails, $2.50 per 
pair. Green Wing Teal, $4.00 per pair. Blue Wing Teal, 
■$3 00 per pair. Also redheads, Gadwalls, Widgeons, 
Canvasbacks, Spoonbills, at reasonable prices, for propa. 

fating and scientific purposes. GEORGE J. KLEIN, 
llinwood, Kansas. 

FOR SALE-PAIR GOLDEN, PAIR SILVER PHEAS- 

ant9, $5.00 each this month. Mallard ducks, $5.00 per 

pair, eggs $2.00 per dozen. Stamp for inquiry. A. S. 

COOPER, Howell. Mich. j-/6 

GOLDEN PHEASANTS— S10.00 A PAIR. EGGS 30c 
each. FRANKLIN J. PITTS, 14 Webster St., Taunton, 

Mass. 7- ib 



CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATED PHEASANT BREED- 
ERS. Pheasant. Quail, Mallard price list. FRED D. 
HOYT, Hay ward, Cal. 

WE HAVE A FINE LOT OF PINIONED PHEAS- 
ANTS for sale Prices on application. THURSTON 
COUNTY GAME FARM, Olympia, Wash. H. W. 
Myers, Supt., R. F. D. No. 1. 

PHEASANTS. VERSICOLOR COCKS. LADY AM- 
HERSTS, Goldens, Chinese Ring Necks. Eggs in 
season. All pure bred stock. Pearl Guinea Fowl, Fancy 
Pigeons. ROBINSON BROTHERS, Aldershot, Ontario, 
Canada. 

FOR SALE — A QUANTITY OF SILKIES AND 

other bantams for hatching pheasants and quail. Apply 

BEAL, Route 1, Englishtown, New Jersey. 2-ib 

WE HAVE FOR SALE, 250 PAIRS OF STRONG, 
hardy Ring Neck Pheasants, and 150 pairs of Mallard 
Ducks. All ready and in good condition for immediate 
shooting. Address DR. C. S. FOSTER, Treasurer, Kil- 
larney Game Breeding Association, Diamond Bank 
Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

DEER WANTED— Wanted, one pair of adult fallow deer. 
State price. A. C. C, care of The Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



DOGS 



NORWEGIAN BEAR DOGS, IRISH WOLFHOUNDS, 
English bloodhounds, Russian wolfhounds, American fox- 
hounds, lion, cat, deer, wolf, coon and varmint dogs. ' All 
trained. Shipped on trial. Satisfacfion guaranteed or 
money refunded. Purchaser to decide. Fifty page highly 
illustrated catalogue, 5c. stamp. ROOK WOOD KEN- 
NELS, Lexington, Kentucky. 

THE BLUE GRASS FARM KENNELS, of Berry, Ky., 
offer for sale setters and pointers, fox and cat hounds, 
wolf and deer hounds. Coon and opossum hounds, var- 
mint and rabbit hounds, bear and lion hounds, also Aire- 
dale terriers. All dogs shipped on trial, purchaser to 
judge the quality, satisfaction guaranteed or money re- 
funded. Sixty page, highly illustrated, instructive and 
interesting catalogue for ten cents in stamps or coin. 

FOX, COON, SKUNK AND RABBIT HOUNDS 
broke to gun and field and guaranteed. The kind that 
are bred and trained for hunting by experienced hunters. 
Fox, coon and rabbit hound pups from pedigreed stock, 
and extra fine ones, price $5.00 each. Stamp for photo. 
H. C. LYTLE, Fredericksburg, Ohio. 

WANTED— BRACE OF RETRIEVER PUPS, GOOD 

breed, also a brace of Clumber spaniel pups. Apply 

BEAL, Route 1, Englishtown, New Jersey. 2-/6 



GAME BIRDS 'WANTED 

WANTED— MONGOLIAN AND RINGNECK PHEAS- 
ANTS and deer for breeding. Also cub bear. Give 
description and prices. CLARE WILLARD, Allegany. 
New York. 

WANTED, RUFFED GROUSE AND NORTHERN 
quail for breeding purposes. State price and number 
LOUIS WILL, Syracuse, N. Y. 



In writing to airerrisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for M«ic <".i»r««." 



170 



THE GAME BREEDER 



PHEASANTS WANTED. ONLY RARE VARIETIES 

such as Tragopans, Manchurian, Firebacks, Impeyans, 

etc. Kindly quote price. A.J MERLE, Alameda, Calif. 

WANTED —WHITE PEAFOWL, EITHER SEX, 
Pied Peafowl, Soemmerring, Cheer, Hold and German 
Peacock Pheasants, Ruffed Grouse, and White Squirrels. 
Also Swinhoes; state price and number. R. A. CHILES 
& CO., Mt. Sterling, Ky. 

WANTED—FANCY AVIARY PHEASANTS, RING- 
necks, peacocks, partridges, quail, prairie chickens, 
wood and mandarin ducks. Quote prices. ROBERT 
HUTCHINSON, Littleton, Colo. 



GAME EGGS 



RING NECK PHEASANT EGGS FROM CHOICE 

stock. Order now for early delivery. $ 2 50 per setting 

of 15 eggs. EDWARD W. DOLAN, Worthington. 

Minn. 5-1° 

WILD MALLARD DUCK EGGS— APRIL TO MAY 
15, iqi6, $15.00 per hundred. May 16 to July 5, 1016, 
$1200 per hunded. Safely packed (send draft). Order 
at once. First come, first served (no limit, no discount). 
C. BREMAN CO., Danville, Illinois. 

CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATED PHEASANT BREED- 
ers offer; January, February, mallard eggs. Stamp for 
price list, pheasant, quail, duck, eggs and birds. F. D. 
HOYT, Sec, Hayvvard, Calif. 

ORDERS FOR RINGNECK PHEASANT EGGS FOR 
season 1916 — Fine healthy stock — Birds not related — 
Price $3.50 for 15 DR. HOLM AN, Attleboro, Mass. 

PHEASANT EGGS FOR SALE; STRICTLY FRESH 
and fertile. I am now booking orders for spring and 
summer. Amherst, Golden, Silver. GRAY PHEAS- 
ANTRIES, Ward Street, Orange, New Jersey. 

EGGS FROM RINGNECK PHEASANTS, MALLARD 

ducks. All the popular breeds of high grade chickens. 

MILL ROAD POUITRY FARM, Apple Grove. 

Virginia. 5-ib 

RINGNECK PHEASANS EGGS FOR SALE. 
ISAAC SPENCER, 10 Wayne Ave., Ipswich, Mass. 3-16 

MALLARD EGGS. FROM SELECT WINNERS, 
$3 50 per 13, $25.00 per hundred ; from utility stock, $2.00 
per 13, $15.00 per hundred EaTly eggs bring better re- 
sults Enter order now. CLYDE B. TERRELL, Natur- 
alist. Dept. P2, Oshkosh, Wis. 

FOR SALE — WILD MALLARD DUCK, PEKIN 
Duck Mammoth Bronze Turkey Eggs. Limited stock, 
at $2.00 dozen. Also several very high bred, registered 
English Setter male pups. Wanted to buy. 100 gray 
squirrel. INGERSOLL, Wah-wah-taysee Lodge, Buffalo, 
Minn. 



GAMEKEEPERS 



SITUATION WANTEP-HEAD GAMEKEEPER OR 
"Superintendent of large estate cr game preserve. Very 
capable man to show sport. Thoroughly experienced 
rearing pheasants, partridge, quail and wild ducks. 
Management of incubators hatching pheasant and duck 
eggs. Also breeding, training and handling high class 
shooting dogs. Excellent trapper, competent manager. 
Reference present employer. GAMEKEEPER, 157 East 
69th St., New York. 



SITUATION WANTED 
Wanted situation as gamekeeper. Experienced in 
-wild duck "fearing and pheasants; the trapping of 
vermin, and dog breaking. Apply H. H., care of 
The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



WANTED AT ONCE, EXPERIENCED GAME- 
KEEPER. Must understand a little gardening Wife 
could supervise bed linen. House-rooms in clubhouse. 
State experience and salary expected. Addrass HOL- 
LAND FISH AND GAME ASSOCIATION, Riverton, 
Connecticut 



A MARRIED MAN, .THOROUGHLY EXPERI- 
ENCED in breeding pheasants and other wild game, 
training dogs, etc., a man who can meet the public and 
conduct correspondence, yet one who is not afraid of 
soiling his hands. References required. R. K. N., care 
of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



GAMEKEEPER REQUIRES SITUATION. UNDER- 
stands all duties. Best references from Europe and 
this country. Address M. F. care of The Game Breeder, 
150 Nassau Street. New York. 



GAMEKEEPER—WANTS SITUATION FOR NEXT 
season. Skilled in pheasant and duck rearing. Will be 
open for employment January 1st. Reason for changing- 
position is desire 10 gc-t a change of climaie for family 
A. E. JAM RS. care of The Game Breeder. 150 Nassau St.. 
New York City. 

UNDERKEEPER— WANTED A GOOD MAN WHO 
thoroughly understands pheasant rearing, willing and 
obliging. Age aboui 24 years. Send full paniculars of 
references to REARER, care of The Game Breeder, 150 
Nassau St , New York City 7 -/6 



WANTFD-SITUATION 
As Superintendent or Manager on a game farm or 
preserve. Experienced in game and poultry breed ; ng. 
Good reason for desiring change of location. Would 
take an interest in a game farm to breed game com- 
mercially. Address C. McM., office of The Game 
Breeder, 150 Nassau Street. New York City. 



SUPERINTENDENT.- Wanted, by experienced man 
25 years, first-class references from lar^e estates and 
game farms where 3.000 pheasants have been penned and 
20.000 raised yearly. Understand the raising of all kinds- 
of game and wild duck, management of incubators, testing 
of eggs, trapping of vermin, training and management of- 
dogs and all duties making of rabbit wairers. W. B., 
care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., N. Y City. 

EXPERIENCED UNDER KEEPER WANTED FOR 
Private Estate. Single man, age 20 to 24. Applv to- 
T. B., care of The Game Breeder, 150 Nassau St., New 
York City. 

WANTED— A THOROUGHLY EXPERIENCED MAN 
to raise pheasants, who understands planting and pro- 
tecting quail. English or Scotch, married with small' 
family. Location, Virginia.— T. D.. care of The Game 
Breeder. 150 Nassau Street, New York City. 



REAL ESTATE 



GAME BREEDING FARM WANTED 
Wanted to purchase or rent a. small place in one 
of the Eastern States where game breeding is legal. 
A small farm with a pond and stream is desired. 
State price and location. M. A. C, care of The 
Game Breeder, 1 SO Nassau St., N. Y. City. 



WANTED PARTNER—TO TAKE AN INTEREST 
in a deer park and preserve near New York. 150 acres 
fenced with eight foot fence, containing deer and an 
abundance of ruffed grouse. Two trout streams and 
splendid water for wild duck breeding G. B.. care of The 
Game Breeder. 150' Nassau St., New York City. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



"PHEASANT FARMING," AN ILLUSTRATED, 
practical booklet on pheasant rearing, postpaid, fifty. 
cents. Circular, all necessary pheasant equipment iree. 
SIMPSONS PHEASANT FARM, Corvallis. Oregon. 



.. In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yoursfor More Game." 



THE GAME BREEDER 



171 



WHITE'S PRESERVE— WILD CELERY AND ALL 
kinds of wild duck food, plants and seeds. Also enter- 
tain sportsmen. Waterlily, Currituck Sound, North Caro- 
lina. 



BLACK SIRER1AN HARE:— THE DEMAND FOR 
fuller information concerning this wcnderlul fur-bear- 
ing animal is so great that we are forced to publish a 
larger booklet to answer the many questions our little 
booklet brought from our customers. 

We are deeply indebted to M. Shacknoe, Naturalist, 
late of Siberia, for the most of the information in this 
last and larger booklet. esDecially the habits uf the animal 
in ihe wild state. Booklet 25 cents. SIBERIAN HARE 
COMPANV, Hamilton, Canada. 



WILD DUCKS' NATURAL FOODS Will attract 
ti.em. I heceioods collected, examinations made, plant- 
ings planned and superintended. Write for free infor- 
mation. CLYDE B TERRELL, Specialist on the Natural 
Foods of Wild Ducks, Dept. Pi, Oshkosh, Wis 



SAN LORENZO GAME FARM — BREEDER OF 
all kinds of pheasants ; eggs in season ; also birds 
for sale at all times. Visitors welcome. Write for 
price list. Mrs. S. MATTHIESSEN, San Lorenzo, 
Alameda Co., California. j-16 



THE AMATEUR TRAINER 

By Ed. F. Haberlein 

A practical trainer of over 30 years' experience, whose 
system is up to date and stands unequaled. 

Neiv EdUion Just Out. Illustrated. 
A plain, practical and concise, yet thorough guide 
in the art of training, handling and the correcting 
of faults of the bird do? subservient to the gun 
afield. Written especially for the novice, but 
equally valuable to the experienced handler. By 
following the instructions plainly given, every 
shooter possessed of a little common sense and 
patience can train his own dogs to perfection. 

Paper cover, $1.00; best full cloth binding and gold 
embossed, $1.50. Address 

THE GAME BREEDER, 150 Nassau Street, N. Y. 



Mallard 




Mallard Duck Eggs by the dozen or 

hundred. Our stock has free 

range and are flyers. 



Buckstaff Farm 



Oshkosh 



Wisconsin 



Heating and Cooking Stoves for 
Clubs and Cottages 



The Camp Cook Stove 

This is an ideal cook stove for the 
Mining, Lumber and Military 
Camps; will work just as well in 
the open air as indoors. 

Construction Companies working 
arge gangs of men will find this 
well suited to their requirements. 




TRONSIDF.S 



A FEW OF THE LEADING STOVES FURNISHED 



Radnor Ranges 
Home Victor Ranees 
Victor Cook Dobule O ven 

Ranges 
■Hotel Ranges 
Royal Victor Ranges 
No. io Ironsides Cook 
Patrol Wood Stove 
No. go Ironsides 
Haddon Ranges 



Home Victor Hot Water Stoves 

Farmer Girl Cook 

New H. A. Elm Double Heaters 

Vulcan Double Heaters 

Tropic Sun Heating Stoves 

Haddon Hercules Heating Stoves 

Ormond Ranees 

No. 15 Hot Blast Heating Stoves 

Victor Gem Cook 

Laundry Stoves 



Index Heating Stoves 
Solar Kent Heating 

Stoves 
Prompt Ranges 
Cozy Ranges 
Victor Cook Ranges 
Loyal Victor Ranges 
Victor Hotel Ranges , 
Elm Ranees 
Farmer Boy Cook Stoves 



Our Friend Cook Stoves 
Sentry Wood Stoves 
Home Victor Cellar Furnaces 
Home Cellar Furnaces 
Victor Cellar Furnaces 
Victor Solar Cellar Furnaces 
Farmer's Furnaces and 

Cauldrons 



.1 lit n u factu red by 



S. V. REEVES, 45 N. 2nd St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: "Yours for More Game." 



172 THE GAME BREEDER 



CONTENTS 



Survey of the Field— Public Hunting Grounds— Upland Game— Cheap Clubs— 
What Mr. Dunn Should Do— Deer Gone— Pheasants in the United States- 
Eggs $1,000 Each— Bon Mots from Judge Beaman's Brief— Another^Conservation 
Society— The Law for Half-Breeds — A Moss-Grown Plank — Louisiana's Con- 
servation Laws Interest Australia — Cost of Rearing Wild Ducks. 

Breeding Wild Ducks and Wild Geese E. D. Pickell 

Wild Fowl Breeding in Louisiana ... - E. W. Mcllhenny 

The Prairie Grouse - • - - - - - D. W. Huntington 

The Black Siberian Hare - R- H. Cowan 

The Cinnamon Teal - Harold C. Bryant 

The Cinnamon Teal ------ From Birds of the North West 

The Migratory Bird Law Case ------ D. C. Beaman 

Notes from the Game Farms. 

Breeding Wild Fowl in Kansas by Geo. J. Kline — Black Ducks— Muskrats and 

Ducks — Malformed Deer Horns — Eagles — Do Rabbits Play Possum ? Japanese 

Barberry. 
Editorials —The Cinnamon Teal — Breeding Other Species— Persistent Birds and 

"Fool Laws." 
Correspondence — Outings and Innings. 



To THE GAME BREEDER, 

150 Nassau Street, New York. 

Please send me THE GAME BREEDER, for one year. 

$1.00 enclosed. 

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Street 

City 

State 

N. B.— Write Name and Street Address plainly and state if you 
wish back numbers of the magazine to the first of the year. 



T h f Game Breeder 

Published Monthly. Enteied as second-class matter. July 9, igis, at the Post Office, New York City, 

New York, under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



VOLUME VIII 



MARCH, I9J6 

CD 
SURVEY OF THE FIELD. 



NUMBER 6 



Public Hunting Grounds. 

W. W. Dunn says with the rapid 
clearing of the forests of this State 
(Minnesota) and the cultivation of the 
wild lands, the time is not far distant 
when practically all small game will be 
very scarce and future generations must 
look largely to the migratory water fowl 
for their game — duck hunting will be the 
only regular dependable sport. Mr. 
Dunn suggests public hunting grounds 
for ducks. He refers to the abundance 
of lakes and ponds in the State and sug- 
gests that some be made quiet breeding 
places and that the gunners be permitted 
to shoot ducks, not on the breeding 
ponds, but on public passes between 
them. 

Some ducks, no doubt, will breed on 
ponds where they are not properly 
looked after, but many more ducks will 
be produced on waters where duck 
breeding is encouraged. We produced 
one season 2,500 wild ducks about a lit- 
tle artificial pond on a rented farm where 
there were no ducks and where there 
was practically no shooting at any game ; 
there was none to shoot. The public 
had a chance to shoot about 1,000 of the 
ducks we produced because they left. 
We heard of their being shot many miles 
away from the pond. 

Upland Game. 

While we were conducting the wild 
duck experiment we turned down a few 
quails, and one morning when we went 
to see the young ducks on the pond, 
which was only a few hundred yards 
from the house, we flushed three big 
covies of quail without the aid of a dog. 
These birds were flushed as we walked 
directly from the house to the pond, we 



were not hunting for quail. A little later 
in the season we shot about six or eight 
hundred pheasants in a few fields on the 
same farm which contained about 180 
acres; and one day, within a few yards 
of the house, where a few guns were 
having some lively shooting at pheasants 
several ruffed grouse and quail were shot 
by accident. We had not opened the 
shooting for our quail and grouse. This 
farm was not very suitable for game 
because it was sandy and had very little 
natural food, especially tender green 
vegetation, which is highly desirable for 
young game birds. It certainly was not 
suitable for wild fowl because we were 
obliged to make a duck pond. 

Cheap Clubs. 

There are a number of inexpensive 
quail clubs quite near New York where 
the members have excellent quail and 
rabbit shooting and some have many 
ruffed grouse. The dues are very small 
and anyone who can shoot easily can 
procure enough meat to offset the 
amount of the dues. A member who 
prefers game to beef or ham, for exam- 
ple, can use his meat money to pay for 
his game. He saves a little on a hotel 
bill also, because he has, for less money, 
better quarters at the club and better 
food than he can find at the average 
country hotel. No harm is done to any 
one when such shooting is provided be- 
cause, in the absence of such industry 
the conditions predicted by Mr. Dunn, 
occur. The game had become not only 
"very scarce," but in many places there 
was none. 

The writer had some excellent quail 
shooting one day just outside the fence 
of one of these inexpensive clubs on 



174 



THE GAME BREEDER 



some unposted farms and wild lands and 
bagged a few ruffed grouse and a wood- 
cock- for good measure. It seemed to be 
far better than having a law as they 
have in Ohio and some other States pro- 
hibiting the shooting of quail, ruffed 
grouse and woodcock. 

We predict that thousands of prairie 
grouse, sharp-tailed grouse, quail and 
other upland game birds soon will be shot 
every season in Minnesota without fear 
of extinction. 

What Mr. Dunn Should Do. 

Although the suggestion that the State 
provide public duck passes for indigent 
gunners is unobjectionable, we believe 
it would pay Mr. Dunn to get in touch 
with some of the members of the clubs 
which have excellent shooting at a cost 
of from $15 to $100 per annum and 
learn how they do it. It would seem that 
a gunner who cannot pay $15 per year 
for at least fifteen dollars' worth of meat 
(game) might fairly be considered in the 
indigent class, and that, possibly, the 
State should look after him. We think 
it would be a good plan for the State to 
buy him a hand-trap and a few "clays" 
so he could practice up and be ready for 
the ducks on the public duck pass. We 
have often insisted that public grounds, 
not private farms, are the places for pub- 
lic shooting. The public waters surely 
will have more ducks when the duck 
breeding industry is encouraged on pri- 
vate lands and waters as it is now in 
many States. We strongly urge Mr. 
Dunn to organize a game club. We like 
these even better than trap shooting 
clubs, but all the game clubs have traps 
and clay targets for good measure. 

Deer Gone. 

The few deer that the Sportsman's League 
brought to Beaver County have all gone away 
to the delight of most farmers. 

E. J. T., in Rural New-Yorker. 

Beaver, Pa. 

Why not turn down some buffaloes? 
The Game Conservation Society can sup- 
ply the stock animals. The truth of the 
matter is that on most farms the sports- 
men should not expect to find game ex- 
cepting they first make satisfactory ar- 



rangements with the land owners. As 
soon as the sportsmen and farmers work 
together under the good game breeders' 
laws we will have game in abundance. 

Pheasants in the United States. 

The United States rapidly is becoming 
one of the biggest pheasant producing 
countries in the world. Many members 
of the Game Conservation Society now 
produce over a thousand pheasants an- 
nually. Quite a number of game farms 
and shooting clubs. produce as many as 
three thousand birds each season. Some 
of the places produce five thousand birds 
and more. 

State game farms in many States have 
thousands of pheasants and eggs for dis- 
tribution. Many of the commercial 
game farms sell thousands of eggs. 

Pheasants sell readily in large lots in 
the New York markets at from $2.00 to 
$2.50 each. Eggs sell readily at $20 and 
$25 per hundred. 

There are over a thousand small breed- 
ers who have pheasants and many of 
them sell both birds and eggs. The num- 
ber of breeders is increasing rapidly in 
States which recently have made pheas- 
ant breeding a legal industry. There are 
many pheasant breeders in Canada and 
the indications are that all of the Pro- 
vinces soon will make pheasant breeding 
a legal industry as it should be. Why 
should the profitable production of de- 
sirable foods on the farms be a criminal 
offense? There appears to be no moral 
turpitude in such industry. 

In a few years we predict North 
America will be the biggest pheasant pro- 
ducing country in the world. 

It is high time the profitable produc- 
tion of our quail and grouse should be 
encouraged. Some game breeders have 
thousands of quail. Give the quail 
breeders the same rights pheasant breed- 
ers now have and the markets soon will 
be filled with these birds which are even 
better food than the pheasants. 

Eggs, $1,000 Each7 

We were of the opinion that members 
of the Game Conservation Society were 
getting good prices for wild turkey, 
pheasant, wild duck, quail eggs, etc., but 






THE GAME BREEDER 



175 



the following from the Press, N. Y., 
seems to be the high limit for eggs. 

The Press says : 

Persons who have been wailing at paying 60 

cents a dozen for eggs are hereby given free 

and full permission to faint, for Mrs. Robert 

" Gilfort, of Main street and Essex avenue, sold 

•an egg to-day for $1,000 ! 

Tis not a hen's egg, however. It is an egg 
•of the Aepyornis, more commonly known as 
the roc, the giant bird which Sindbad the 
Sailor, the original Doc Cook, pressed into 
service as an elevator when he was marooned 
in the Valley of Diamonds. It is one of three 
roc eggs in the United States, the others being 
in the Smithsonian Institution and in a mu- 
seum in Pittsburgh. The one which Mrs. 
■Gilfort sold to-day will be placed in the Denver 
Museum. 

The egg is quite sizable, measuring thirty- 
five and a half inches at its point of maximum 
circumference, having a diameter of about ten 
inches and weighing about five pounds. Robert 
Gilfort, an old circus man, found the egg in a 
stream in Madagascar, where fossil remains of 
the roc have been unearthed. 

Bon Mots from Judge Beaman's Brief. 

The brief of Judge Daniel C. Beaman, 
of Colorado, filed in the United States 
Supreme Court in opposition to the va- 
lidity of the Federal Migratory Bird Act, 
is reviewed on another page. Referring 
to the briefs in favor of the act, Judge 
Beaman says : "The laws from feudal 
times down to interstate commerce are 
•cited. The only suggestion of import- 
ance they have failed to make on the 
commerce point is as to the storks which 
have generally been known as 'common 
carriers' of babies. 

"The European war it is asserted dem- 
onstrated that success in war depended 
less on military efficiency than upon 
power to wear out the enemy until the 
food resources were exhausted. 

"Hence," says Judge Beaman, "I sup- 
pose Congress deemed it the acme of 
wisdom to have a closed season on mud 
hens, while leaving the season open on 
American citizens in Mexico." 

Another Conservation Society. 

A reader sends a clipping, from the 
N. Y. Sun, which says the superintend- 
ent of the N. Y. Zoo proposes to start 
a conservation society to save the wild 
flowers, trees and game animals. Imita- 
tion is said to be the sincerest flattery 



and we are pleased at the idea of a 
brand new conservation society. We 
hope the four members named in the 
clipping will all attend the game dinners 
of the Game Conservation Society and 
learn how game rapidly can be and is 
made abundant by eating it in abund- 
ance. We extend an invitation for them 
to attend all of our dinners where we 
hope to serve game big and small with- 
out police interference. All we ask is 
that game producers be exempt from 
the laws which are intended to save the 
wild game not owned by game breeders. 

The Law for Half-breeds. 

If it is true (and it no doubt is) that 
none of the game breeders have true 
wild mallards, undoubtedly they are ex- 
empt from the game laws and can shoot 
and sell their game in any season without 
fear of the police. This is as it should 
be. People who have Plymouth rock 
hens and other fowl which undoubtedly 
are descendants of wild birds are not 
jailed for selling the food they produce. 
Possibly one who sells a half-wild tur- 
key might be kept half in and half out 
of jail or only in part time to satisfy 
what are commonly known as "fool 
laws." 

The Moss Grown Plank 

For forty-three years — more than a 
generation, Forest and Stream says it 
has "fought the battle of game and fish 
conservation in this country * * * 
Twenty years ago Forest and Stream 
announced its famous platform plank, 
'The sale of game should be forbidden 
at all times.' We all know what has hap- 
pened in the twenty years that have 
passed." 

We do. Within the period named 
shot-guns were commonly sold and used 
for quail shooting in Ohio and many 
other states where game was plentiful. 
Many sportsmen owned setters and 
pointers and advertisements for the sale 
of these dogs appeared numerously in 
Forest and .Stream and other sporting 
papers. Not a gun can now be fired 
legally at a quail ; not a quail dog is used 
in the entire state of Ohio, and the 



176 



THE GAME BREEDER 



same may be said of many other big 
states besides Ohio- — neither a gun nor a 
dog is used for quail shooting in New- 
York, excepting on Long Island, where 
it has been an expensive struggle to 
keep quail shooting on the map. 

We can readily see why the advertise- 
ments of shooting dogs have almost en- 
tirely disappeared from Forest and 
Stream and the other sporting maga- 
zines, excepting those devoted to Field 
Trials, and we read, not long ago, in a 
dog paper devoted largely to field trials 
that it was "against the ethics" of the 
field trial to shoot a bird. Anyone who 
goes afield must be aware of "what has 
happened in the twenty years that have 
passed." 

The latest copy of the leading dog 
paper published in the United States con- 
tains a little over thirteen pages of space 
dog advertisements. Neither the setter, 
nor the pointer, nor the retriever, nor 
the spaniel, appears on these pages. 
There are a few, a very few, pointers 
and setters offered in diminutive adver- 
tisements on the classified pages where 
bull dogs and toy dogs and other non- 
sporting dogs are offered in abundance. 
Within the time mentioned by Forest 
and Stream we have had some excellent 
grouse shooting in many counties where 
the prairie grouse has become extinct. 
We have shot sharp-tailed grouse in 
places where they were plentiful, but 
where, alas! they no longer occur. We 
have shot thousands of ducks on marshes 
which have been drained because it did 
not pay to have wild ducks, and we are 
fully and sadly aware of what' has hap- 
pened in "the twenty years that have 
passed" while the dear old Forest and 
Stream has slumbered on the plank, un- 
mindful of the gathering moss which has 
made it appear so green and beautiful. 
But where is the game that once was 
plentiful? What has become of upland 
shooting in America? Where are the 
setters and the pointers which were once 
used for quail and grouse shooting? 



Louisiana's Conservation Laws Inter- 
est Australia. 

The laws that have been formulated 
and put into practice to conserve the 
natural resources of Louisiana have in- 
terested Australia to such an extent that 
David G. Head, chief commissioner of 
the Fisheries Department of New South 
Wales, has written M. L. Alexander, 
President of the Conservation Commis- 
sion of Louisiana, for copies of all acts 
and regulations designed to conserve the 
Pelican State's enormous natural re- 
sources for reference in framing similar 
laws for New South Wales. 



Subscribe for The Game Breeder, only 
$1 a year. 



Can Wild Ducks Be Reared Profitably? 

One of our New York readers says in 
a letter to The Game Breeder: "Any 
persons who think they can raise wild 
ducks at a profit had better try it and 
convince themselves. It cannot be done." 

About the time this letter came a Con- 
necticut reader wrote I have sold all m)> 
wood ducks and mallards that I care tr 
sell this season. I find that I must get 
$1 for mallards in order to make it pay 
to rear them. Since mallards have been 
selling at from $1.50 to $2 each to tl 
New York hotels and even to dealers, 
there should be a profit in selling ducks 
at these figures if they can be raised for 
less than $1. Unfortunately our Con- 
necticut reader cannot sell his food in 
New York on account of a "fool law." 
This absurdity will disappear before 
long as others have. 

The cost of rearing wild ducks de- 
pends much upon the location. In some 
places where natural foods are plentiful 
it is only necessary to feed the wild 
ducks once a day. In other places they 
must be fed two or three times to be 
sure of holding them. When young 
ducks are reared about the edge of a 
marshy pond they will find much natural 
food and the amount of duck meal and 
other artificial foods necessary is much 
reduced. We are of the opinion thai 
mallards and black ducks reared on good 
rearing ground can be made to show a 
small profit if they be sold early at $1 
each. 



THE GAME BREEDER 



177 



BREEDING WILD DUCKS AND WILD GEESE. 

By E. D. PlCKELL. 



I have raised wild game and water 
fowl for over thirty years just for my 
own pleasure. I am obliged to devote 
the greater part of my time to other 
work but every moment that can be 
spared from my duties I devote to my 
birds. No other kind of work appeals 
to me so strongly as going out among my 
ducks, geese and other birds and attend- 
ing to their wants. 

I have only raised a few black ducks ; 
these were for the most part tame birds, 
that is to say, birds bred in captivity so 
long that they were more like mallards 
than the usual black duck of to-day, 
often called the black mallard. I cleaned 
up on them last year and am not breed- 
ing them now but I shall get some good 
specimens this year. The birds are 
reared quite successfully but they do not 
lay quite so many eggs as the mallards 
and they are more timid, usually, than 
mallards. 

I have had splendid success with the 
pin-tailed ducks, even more than with the 
mallards. This, no doubt, is because I 
like the pintails better than the mallards. 
I have them tamer than any mallards I 
have ever raised. My birds will come 
when I call them and eat from my hands. 
When birds are as tame as this, thev 
will lay readily if given a chance; by 
this I mean they must be put on a marsh 
or near a small lake where reeds and 
grasses protect them from their enemies. 
The fence should be placed well back 
from the water in order that the ducks 
can get away from the water and o" 
high land. I seldom, if ever, find a pin- 
tail, teal or mallard nest near the water. 
Both the pintail and the teal must be 
permitted to think they are free to nest 
where they please before you will have 
any success with them. This is the true 
secret of success. 
•Give the birds plenty of natural covers 
for concealment and keep them quiet 
and undisturbed. Never allow visitors 
near your breeding birds. I have had 
blue-winged teal set so closely on their 



nests that they allowed one to pick them 
up without causing them to cease sitting. 
I am careful, however, not to disturb 
them until they have laid their full nest 
of eggs which usually is about fourteen. 

I carefully remove the first clutch of 
eggs, placing them under a small hen or 
bantam, already broody and prepared to 
receive the eggs. Nine times out of ten 
the mother teal will build another nest 
after about three weeks and she then 
lays from nine to eleven eggs. The teal 
are allowed to hatch the last laid eggs 
and to rear the young birds until they 
are full feathered on the breast. At this 
time I take the ducklings from the 
mother duck and place them with those 
I have reared by hand, allowing all of 
them the full run of the slough ;_ this is 
quite necessary in order to raise the 
young birds taken from the duck. If 
shut up in yards they will not be con- 
tented and most of them will die. 

I commence feeding those hatched un- 
der hens when they are twenty-four 
hours old. I feed very little, at first, of 
Spratt's duck food. I have also used 
Evan's food with good success. These 
foods with what insects they find while 
following the mother hen is all I ever 
give them until they are fully six weeks 
old. I then begin feeding coarser foods, 
such as corn meal and small chick food 
with plenty of grit. They are allowed 
free access to water at all times. 

We observe them early every morning, 
long before other fowls are abroad, skip- 
ping about in the grass, catching the 
early bugs which have ventured forth. 
By eight o'clock they are back ready for 
breakfast with enough insects eaten to 
balance perfectly with their duck meal 
breakfast. 

Pintailed ducks delight to nest in hay- 
stacks or old straw piles. A mallard 
always will be found on top of the stack 
if she can get there ; the pintails will be 
observed nesting about half way up. 

I always provide hay-piles for my 
geese. These are distributed throughout 



178 



THE GAME BREEDER 



the goose pasture. The geese will make 
their own nests and protect them also. 
I have had two geese lay two clutches 
of eggs but the geese will not lay a sec- 
ond time unless the first eggs are taken. 
I have often tried removing the eggs, 
hoping to increase the number, but I 
have about decided it is best to let the 
goose keep her eggs in the nest unless 
the weather is too cold, then the egg? 
are removed and carefully turned every 
day. A few glass eggs should be left in 
the nest of the goose. I never have had 
over twelve eggs from one goose, these 
being two clutches of eggs. If the gos- 
lings are allowed to run with the mother 
goose on a good grass pasture with ac- 
cess to water, they will eat very little 
food besides grass. 

The gadwall duck, in proper locations, 
is as easy to rear as the mallard. I be- 
lieve all ducks are more certain to lay 
eggs in captivity if they are kept in places 
to which they come naturally every year 
to breed. They undoubtedly will do best 
when they have the same climate and 
surroundings which they always have 
had. 

I find it very hard to winter the deep 
water or diving ducks, the canvasback. 



redhead, scaup, etc., in this climate 
(South Dakota). The canvasback and 
the redhead, however, soon will learn to 
eat various grains and they are doing 
well here. 

The shovellers can be raised easily and 
they are much hardier than some of th< 
other species I have kept, such as the 
butterball or buffle-head and the ruddy 
duck. 

Widgeons I found perfectly hardy. I 
have also succeeded in rearing the birds 
known here as the white-brant — the 
snow goose. These birds seldom have 
been bred in captivity. 

I have a very interesting and beautiful 
pair of hybrid geese. My white-fronted 
gander crossed with a Canada goose. 

I never sell wild cluck eggs. I find it 
better to hatch them. I have shipped a 
few eggs to friends but not often did they 
get a good hatch. I think the eggs of 
the teal, pintail and the other more deli- 
cate varieties should be hatched under 
hens and not transported. I am quite 
sure much handling destroys their fer- 
tility. 

I wish The Game Breeder great suc- 
cess. 



WILD FOWL BREEDING IN LOUISIANA. 

E. W. McTlhenny. 



Both the green- winged teal and the 
blue-winged teal should be given more 
attention by game breeders, as they I 
come very tame and breed readily in 
captivity. 

I have no record of the green-winged 
teal breeding in Louisiana in the wild 
state. I have bred them for a number 
of years in inclosures. The blue-winged 
teal is beginning to breed fairly com- 
monly on the wild life refuges. I think 
most of these birds are from stock orig- 
inally raised by me in captivity, as the 
local raised bird seems to be increasing 
here. 

The Florida duck and the mottled duck 
both nest here in very large numbers and 
a few mallards also nest here. The 



wood duck is a common breeder and, 
according to the wardens on Marsh Isl- 
and, both the gadwall and baldpate nested 
last year. I have had gadwalls nesting 
in captivity for a number of years and 
a few of these local raised birds have 
nested in the vicinity of my place. 

I have never sold any duck eggs, never 
having kept more than enough of these 
birds in confinement to supply my own 
wants and those of a few friends. 

Our local Southern black duck breeds 
freely in confinement after the second 
year as does the blue-winged teal and 
gadwall. It is unusual for any of these 
ducks to lay eggs the first spring after 
being hatched. I have found that the 
black ducks lay just about the same 



THE GAME BREEDER 



179 



number of eggs as the greenhead, any- 
where from 25 to 35 during the season, 
but they begin laying much earlier. I 
have quite a lot of them now setting and 
all of my two-year-old black ducks are 
laying. 

I have been breeding blue-winged teal 
in captivity for a number of years, suc- 
cessfully, and also have been successful 
with wild mallards. 

There is a great question in my mind 
whether any game breeders have wild 
mallards. The ducks I have seen on the 



various private game farms are all mixed 
up crossed with Rouens English call 
ducks and wild mallards. These ducks 
will breed regularly year after year, and 
what usually are sold as mallards by the 
game breeders, but they are entirely dif- 
ferent in general appearance from the 
true wild mallards. 

What is true of the black ducks is also 
true of the wild mallards: they generally 
do not breed until they are two years 
old. 



THE PRAIRIE GROUSE. 

Plan for a Grouse Preserve. 

Ninth Paper. 

By D. W. Huntington. 






Although a few prairie grouse have 
been bred in captivity and some natural- 
ists believe these birds can be domesti- 
cated, I would strongly advise those who 
wish to breed them to do so in a wild 
state on protected areas. This method 
has been proved to be tremendously suc- 
cessful on the grouse moors of Scotland 
and on many preserves in England an r ' 
Ireland where the red grouse are abund- 
ant. 

The natural law, often referred to i 
The Game Breeder, that if the checks to 
the increase of any species be controlled, 
quickly the species will increase in -num- 
bers, applies to the grouse as well as to 
quail and other game birds. The con- 
trol of the natural enemies of the grouse 
cannot be expected, however, to produce 
good results on areas where the natural 
foods and covers have been destroyed ab- 
solutely, and where the birds surely will 
suffer more from climatic losses than 
they ever did from vermin. 

The natural foods of the grouse have 
been enumerated in this series of papers. 
Many of them will grow abundantly 
almost anywhere if they be introduced 
and permitted to grow wild. The prin- 
cipal natural covers are grasses, wild 
roses, sunflowers and some of the other 
food plants. Where the grass is de- 



stroyed on large areas and wheat and 
other grains are closely cultivated, as 
they are in the Dakotas, Montana and 
elsewhere, it would be difficult if not im- 
possible to introduce and propagate 
grouse until some covers and natural 
foods are provided. The nest is usually 
placed in the midst of thick prairie grass 
or in the corner of some field among 
weeds, on the border of swamps and 
sloughs, in cultivated grounds, or far out 
on the prairie, sometimes in quite ex- 
posed situations. A slight depression in 
the soil is lined with grass and some 
feathers from the hen's own body.* 
* The Game Birds of North America. Elliot, 
The hen lays from ten to fourteen 
eggs. Elliot says, sometimes twenty or 
more have been found in one nest. There 
can be no doubt that these birds literally 
swarmed on vast areas at a time when 
their natural enemies (the prairie falcon 
and other hawks, the coyote and other 
ground enemies) also were plentiful. 
Audubon says the grouse were regarded 
as a pest in Kentucky. I have seen hun- 
dreds in the air at once on the western 
prairies. The natural increase must have 
been large and rapid to enable the birds 
to stand the annual losses due to vermin. 
Evidently enough stock birds survived 
each season to keep the grouse plentiful. 



180 THE GAME BREEDER 

It is evident also that the birds cannot agation or for food. I have no doubt 

survive if gunners shoot the stock birds that on a preserve containing a few 

left by vermin, and it is certain they thousand acres thousands of prairie 

must become extinct if their natural nest- grouse can either be shot and sold every 

ing sites and foods are extirpated for season or trapped and sold alive for 

good measure. propagation. 

One pair of grouse and its progeny The owner or renter of a farm should 

should produce over 4,000 birds in six be able to rent the shooting on a num- 

years if the nests contain the smallest ber of adjacent farms with the right to 

number of eggs above mentioned, pro- preserve strips of grass and food for 

vided there be no losses. The ratio of the grouse. The quail shooting is rented 

increase is geometrical and if the nests on large areas in North Carolina for 

should contain an average of fourteen from 6 to 10 cents per acre or about the 

eggs the total of course would be 6,000 amount of the taxes. At 10 cents per 

birds for the period named. Even with acre the annual rental is only $64 per 

the best of protection and care there annum for a square mile, and good game 

surely will be some losses but where the keepers have made the quail so tremen- 

covers are made even better than they dously abundant on these places that 

were under natural conditions, and thousands of birds are shot every season, 

where the foods are made more plentiful The quail thrive on mjany praiiries 

and are widely distributed it must 1 where the grouse occur and they can be 

evident that the grouse will tend to in- produced in big numbers on lands where 

crease far more rapidly than they did prairie grouse are properly looked after, 

when they were most abundant, provided provided abundant foods are supplied 

their natural enemies be much reduced and the birds are looked after properly 

in numbers. An English writer says the and fed in the winter. The destruction 

death of one stoat means the life of of natural enemies will result in the 

many grouse and we may be sure that rapid increase of both species on the 

the death of many enemies of various same ground. The grouse, undoubtedly, 

species means the life of many prairie will sell readily for several dollars each 

grouse. These grouse can be shot and and quail for at least one dollar each, 

marketed without any fear of extinction for many years to come, and until the 

from year to year. demand for live birds for propagation 

When grouse preserving was under- and for dead birds as food is fully met. 

taken in Scotland, a few score of years I have in mind a wide stretch of prairie 

ago, the birds rapidly became abundant in Illinois where I used to shoot snipe, 

and before long the annual rental of the On the east there is a road running 

grouse lands was larger than the amount north and south ; two or three miles to 

the lands could have been bought for be- the west is a parallel road and to the 

fore the birds were preserved. The in- north and south there are crossroads 

crease in late years, although the shoot- about three miles distant from each 

ing has been excessive, has been so great other. Through the center of the area 

that some writers believe the grouse have bounded by these four roads there is a 

been made over abundant and that a new slough with some wet land, on either side 

grouse disease which occurs some sea- but the land is excellent on the east and 

sons may be attributed to overcrowding, west sides of the slough and several 

Since the grouse are strong on the large farms extend from the roads to 

wing and, alternately whirring and sail- the slough. Some of the land, probably 

ing, they fly long distances late in the one-half, was unoccupied at the time 

season, it would not seem advisable to when I shot over it. I used to walk out 

attempt to breed them for sport on a from a small village about a mile fror^ 

small area ; possibly they might be bred the eastern boundary of the tract until 

for profit in especially attractive fields I came to a small bridge — which crosses 

where they had absolute quiet and they the slough. At this point I put shells 

might be trapped and sold alive for prop- in my gun and following the slough on 



THE GAME BREEDER 18' 

one side I had excellent snipe shooting If 4,000 grouse can be produced and 

all the way to the northern road where sold from the place at $2 each (they cer- 

another small bridge crossed the slough, tainly will bring nearer $5 than $2 if 

and returning on the other side the shoot- sold alive or dead), the revenue from 

*ing was equally good. On one occasion the grouse should be at least $12,000 per 

I shot a prairie grouse which arose from annum. A thousand or more quail also 

the tall grass bordering the slough and should be sold. These at present prices 

I believe this was the last survivor on would yield at least $1.50 each if sold 

the tract since I went over it with some alive, or $1,500 for the crop. Any ducks 

care hoping to find more of the larger reared on the slough should bring from 

birds. This ground containing (rough- $1 to $2 each and a thousand ducks 

ly estimated) four or five thousand acres would be a small number to rear on the 

easily could be made to produce four or slough I have in mind ; there are thou- 

five thousand grouse, and a big lot of sands of such places in the West I 

quail and ducks for good measure. Leav- reared one season 2,500 mallards on 

ing the slough as it is the ducks could be about seven or eight acres of land with 

bred abundantly. It might be improved very poor ponds and no natural foods 

by making a few inexpensive ponds and such as are plentiful in the Western 

by planting some additional wild duck sloughs. I sold some of the ducks for 

foods. Two good gamekeepers and two $3.25 per brace and could have sold them 

assistants should be enough to properly all. I sold, also, a few hundred duck 

look after the grouse and quail and if eggs at $25 per hundred and many eggs 

the vermin be reduced and a few ducks should be gathered and sold. I have es- 

introduced there would be plenty of timated the expense items high and the 

ducks in addition to the grouse and sales items low. I am quite sure that 

quail. If I am right in my estimate of one skilled keeper and three or four as- 

the number of birds that can be pro- sistants, skilled with the use of the 

duced, I am surely right in saying that shotgun and vermin traps could make 

they can be sold, not in Illinois, but from such a place as I have described yield 

similar places in Oklahoma, Indiana and abundantly. If the breeding operation be 

other States where it is not criminal to undertaken by the owner of the land 

profitably produce foods on a farm. there would be no rent to pay and the 

There are many places where lands expenses might be made about one-half 

such as I have described can be rented of the above estimates. Any one of the 

for breeding and shooting purposes, a three crops, grouse, quail or ducks, 

small part of the land being rented abso- should pay the entire expenses of the 

lutely for nesting sites and plantations place and show a profit. In a good year 

of wild roses, sunflowers and other foods I firmly believe the total profits would 

and covers. If the owners continue to exceed the present value of the land in 

cultivate corn and wheat or other grain places not well settled, which are the 

or hay the birds undoubtedly will find best places for the industry described, 

mudh food in the stubbles and they I am quite sure I can sell the entire 

should not be expensive to rear. Both crop of birds before they are produced 

quail and grouse can be reared very much to reliable purchasers for possibly a little 

cheaper than pheasants. The rent item smaller prices than those named since the 

should not be over $500 per annum, and purchasers would expect to make a good 

wild lands with sloughs and wild grasses profit. I know of no crop that could 

on them undoubtedly can be rented for be more easily sold (cash on delivery) 

less. The wages of the gamekeepers and at a price agreed upon before the crop 

assistants should not be over $2,500 per was produced. One item of expense not 

annum. The rent of two cottages for mentioned is the stock birds. On some 

the keepers should not be over $500 per places many quail and some grouse still 

annum. Extra foods, ammunition for occur. It would be advisable to purchase 

shooting vermin and incidentals should at least a few stock birds and the prices 

not be over $500. for these, excepting the ducks, are high. 



182 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Grouse, no doubt, would cost at least $8 
or $10 per pair. Quail have been selling 
readily at $150 to $200 per hundred, and 
even higher prices have been obtained 
recently. 

An interesting experiment can be made 
with a few grouse and a few quail and 
ducks on a place where the covers and 
foods still occur and where additional 
foods can be planted. The hawks, 
crows, snakes and many other natural 
enemies will prevent any very rapid in- 
crease of the birds if these enemies be 
not persistently destroyed. The ground 
should be patrolled daily by one who can 
shoot well and it should be thoroughly 
trapped at the proper seasons by a skilled 
trapper. I know some young farmers 
who have made a good start with wild 
ducks and in States where it is legal to 
sell grouse and quail these birds will 
bring much better prices than most of 
the common wild ducks and they can be 
produced at a much smaller expense. I 
hope it will not be long before a syndi- 
cate or club is formed to produce prairie 
grouse for the shooting. This is the 
surest and best road to success, since the 
money for the gamekeeper's wages and 
for the other expenses is realized from 
initiation fees and annual dues. I firmly 
believe that a good grouse club operated 
on lands such as I have described, with 
one or more gamekeepers would soon 
have excellent shooting and that it might 
sell enough game to pay all the expenses 
and declare a dividend on the stock. 
This so long as grouse continue to sell 
for $10 or more per pair and quail for 
$18 to $25 per dozen. Certainly there 
should be big profits in breeding birds 
in a wild state in places where they will 
require very little artificial food. It will 
not be long before some important ex- 
periments with the grouse are made by 
members of the Game Conservation So- 
ciety. Those who get into the game first 
will make the most money. If lands i; 
rented at a low price for the shooting 
with a privilege of purchase it is abso- 
lutely certain the lands will be worth 
many times the purchase price agreed 
upon as soon as the grouse again becomes 
abundant. Such increases in land values 
were common in Scotland after grouse 



preserving was undertaken. The shoot- 
ing rentals now seem fabulous as they 
are published in the English papers dur- 
ing the renting season. Many Americans 
visit these places. They surely will be 
prepared to rent and buy shooting lands 
in America in States where breeding 
game is not an illegal industry. Kansas, 
Nebraska and some other States shouk 1 
be avoided. Oklahoma and Indiana are 
probably the most liberal States for 
breeding grouse where they still occur. 
I predict before long it will not be a 
criminal offense to breed grouse profit- 
ably in Kentucky and in Ohio and in fact 
anywhere in the United States. An ab- 
surdity rapidly is being removed from 
the statutes since the "more game" move- 
ment was started by the readers of The 
Game Breeder. 

Elliott concludes his chapter on the 
prairie grouse with the statement that, 
"The inevitable day will surely come 
that will bring the same fate to all 
of our wild creatures, and the prairie 
chicken, like other natives of the -wil- 
derness, will remain only as a mem- 
ory." This prediction evidently was ac- 
curate until the laws were amended so 
as to permit the profitable production 
of grouse. Now we may safely predic 
that these. birds in a few years will be- 
come tremendously abundant and profit- 
able, and that they will remain so be- 
cause it will pay to look after them and 
increase their numbers. 



Quail or Partridge? 

As regards the misnomer "quail," so 
general of the Virginia "partridge," the 
advocates of the appellation, "quail," 
may say the bird is not a partridge, 
which it may not be technically and sci- 
entifically, but it certainly resembles the 
European partridge more than it does the 
European quail. 

And the fact of its being strictly a 
non-migrant, as is the European part- 
ridge, whereas the European quail is a 
decided one, is, I think, conclusive that 
the term quail is incorrect, as applied to 
our bird, and that, as Audubon says, "the 
appellation of partridge is more appro- 
priate." — J. J. Pringle. 



THE GAME BREEDER 183 

THE BLACK SIBERIAN HARE. 

By R. H. Cowan, 

The President, Dr. W. G. Thompson, us to-night a Siberian hare, not yet five 

presided at a meeting of the Rabbit and months old, and we have all seen her 

Hare Society of Canada. weighed, tipping the scales at 13^4 

Mr. R. A. Dickson of Grimsby, On- pounds. I can safely venture to say that 

tario, produced a beautiful pelt from his no such specimen has ever been exhibited 

Siberian buck, killed in an accident a in this country, in any society, as this 

few days previous. This was the first one, which has been exhibited here to- 

skin seen in this country, and naturally night. 

caused much interest. It was carefully "Had this been a made-up breed be- 
examined by the members who much ad- tween the Flemish giant and the angora, 
mired the thickness and toughness of its the size would be greatly decreased, in- 
leather, as well as its rich glossy fur. stead of that, I think, all you gentlemen 
The next specimen brought forward will agree that there is no Flemish giant 
for exhibition and examination was a in America, or anywhere else for its age, 
beautiful ' young black Siberian doe, the size of this animal. I heard a gentle- 
owned by the Siberian Hare Company of man say that the angora would not give 
this city (Hamilton, Canada), 'Toco- the thickness of the fur, and that gen- 
hontus," registered number 40. The tleman is correct. If the angora was 
registrar of the Rabbit and Hare Society used to increase the length of the fur, 
of Canada certified that "Pocohontus" which it doubtless would, the fur would 
was born Sept. 10, 1915, leaving her be- still be shaggy, thin and not a rich, glossy 
tween four and five months old. "Po- fur, which you see in this animal before 
cohontus" tipped the scales at just 13>4 us. Besides this, I would ask the op- 
pounds. The president asked the secre- ponents of the black Siberian hare, who 
tary to read to the society an article pub- declare it to be a made-up breed, which 
lished in the January number of the Pet no doubt would taken ten or fifteen suc- 
Stock Fancier, written by its editor, Mr. cessive generations to bring it to the 
Wm. I. Lyon, in which he infers that perfection, which we find it now in, could 
the Siberian hare may be a made-up rab- this animal be successively bred for all 
oit, as is the Belgian hare and New Zea- these years secretly (as it must have 
land red. In reply to this article, Mr. been) unknown to all the fanciers of this 
Hager of Grimsby spoke as follows : country? If so, what fancier can we 
"After reading the report of Mr. credit with all this patience and perse- 
Lyon, the editor of the National Pet verance in crossing and recrossing be- 
Stock Fancier, where he intimates that tween the Flemish giant and angora? 
the Siberian hare is a made-up breed No rabbit or combination of rabbits could 
by frequent crosses between the black be combined to produce such an animal 
Flemish (if there Is such a rabbit) an.d as we see before us to-night. I would 
the Angora rabbit, I would say that I decide that this is a distinct breed that 
know Mr. Lyon by reputation and have has not been before bred in this country 
always had great confidence in his judo and all the other utility rabbits will sink 
ment. I was inclined to think the same into oblivion in a remrakably short time, 
as he, until I saw this beautiful specimen For size, grace and beauty, where are 
of Siberian hare, when I must confess I the once famous Belgian hares? Where 
am forced to change my opinion ; I am are the New Zealand reds, or any othe 
strongly of the opinion that were Mr. utility rabbit compared with the black 
Lyon with us to-night to examine the Siberian for beauty, flesh and fur? 
specimen of both pelt and living animal. There were specimens of other breeds 
he would be another convert to the Si- of rabbits and hares brought to the meet- 
berian hare. We have here presented to ing, but the interest in the new breed, the 



181 THE GAME BREEDER 

black Siberian hare was so intense, tha' standard of perfection for the Siberian 

they were not even exhibited." hare: Dr. R. H. Cowan, R. E. Brute 

The following gentlemen were appoint- Dr. W. G. Thompson, R. H. Dickson, 

ed to act as a committee to formulate a Dr. T. S. McGillivray and Jas. Petfield. 



THE' CINNAMON TEAL. 

By Harold C. Bryant. 

The cinnamon teal is without doubt winged teal the female cinnamon teal 
the commonest nesting duck in Califor- may be distinguished by its larger size. 
nia. In spite of this fact it is a duck longer bill and neck, and slightly darker 
little known to sportsmen, for practically color. The blue wing patch has givei 
the whole population moves southward the foundation for the name "blue- 
early in the fall and is not present here winged teal," which is often incorrectly 
during the winter season. applied by hunters in this State. 

The most interesting point in the dis- Nesting is at its height during May 
tribution of the cinnamon teal is in the and June. Most often the nest is built 
fact that what is apparently the same on grassy islands, or among tules. Al- 
species has two distinct breeding though nesting most commonly near 
grounds, one in North America and one fresh water, this bird is not uncommon 
in South America. These two regions in the lowlands adjacent to the salt 
are separated by a strip of 2,000 miles marshes along the coast of southern Cali- 
where the bird is practically unknown, fornia. From six to thirteen cream-col- 
The breeding seasons of the two contin- ored or whitish eggs are laid, and these 
gents are six months apart, and birds are well concealed during the absence of 
from the north do not emigrate to th the parent bird by a thick layer of black- 
southern area, nor do the southern birds ish down. While setting the female is 
migrate into the breeding area in North very secretive and only flushes on close 
America. approach to the nest. Broods of small 

In North America the cinnamon teal young are to be found most often dur- 

is to be found almost exclusively wesi ing the latter part of May and the firs: 

of the Rocky Mountains. On the Pacific of June. Although the female performs 

Coast it breeds from southern Britie the duties of incubation, the male ofte 

Columbia and west central Canada to joins her after the young are hatched. 

Lower California. During the winter Downy young are extremely active on 

season it is to be found in the southern- the water and are able to elude pursuit 

most part of this range and somewhat easily by diving. As is the case with 

farther south into Mexico. Most of the most ducks, the mother when disturbed 

California birds go farther south to is adept at the broken-wing ruse, 
spend the winter, but sometimes individ- The cinnamon teal is one of the tamest 

uals winter in certain local areas. of our ducks and can often be ap- 

The attractive colors of the cinnamon proached within a few yards' distance, 

teal have always given it a reputation. After the nesting season family partie; 

No other duck possesses the rich chest- are the general rule. Even when leaving 

nut, or cinnamon, color of the breast of for the south, this species never con- 

the male. The females and young, how- gregates in such large flocks as does thi 

ever, are difficult to distinguish from the green-winged teal. The females alone 

blue-winged teal in like plumages. Close utter wheezy quacks, and it is they also 

examination of the bills of these two that first take wing, 
species will help in identification, for the Food is obtained in shallow water 

bill of the blue wing is smallest and along the borders of the ponds, where 

widest at the base. From the green- the birds may be seen "standing on their 



THE GAME BREEDER 1«5 

heads" to obtain insects and seeds from wholly unfamiliar with this duck. The 

the mud on the bottom. Occasionally present game laws give the cinnamon 

cinnamon teal may be seen searching for teal a greater degree of protection than 

food in the grass on shore. is given almost any other duck. Its per- 

The cinnamon teal is usually consid- sistence as a game species is also assured 

ered inferior to other teal as a table because of its habit of breeding about 

duck. When spring and early fall shoot- almost any small pond or irrigation ditch, 

ing was still allowed in this State th The one factor which will probably affect 

species was commonly sold on the mar : the numbers of this species is the enor- 

ket. At the present time ,however, ver mous amount of reclamation which is 

few cinnamon teal are killed dui ing the reducing the appropriate nesting grounds 

open season and many sportsmen are to a minimum. 



THE CINNAMON TEAL. 

[The following account of The Cinnamon Teal, by Dr. Elliot Coues, is from "The Birds of 
the North West, a publication of the United States Department of the Interior (1874)]. 

It has not often occurred that an Laurence ; the following one, Dr. Wood- 
abundant bird of North Amercia has house recorded it as, "Very abundant 
been first made known generally from throughout Western Texas, New Mexico 
the extreme point of South America and and California. In 1855, in the work 
for a long time recognized only as an mentioned, Mr. Cassin describes and fig- 
inhabitant of that continent. Yet this ures the species, alluding to previous 
species furishes such a case, having been discoveries, and to the occurrence of the 
early named King Anas rafflesi, from bird in 'Chili,' as shown by the collec- 
a specimen taken in the Straits of Ma- tions of the United States Astronomical 
gellan. It is, morever, a singular fact Expedition. By this time it had become 
that it was first discovered in the United known as a bird of Western North 
States in a locality where it is of very America at large, numerous fragmentary 
unusual and probably only accidental oc- accounts having been given by the nat- 
currence. It has not, to my knowledge, uralists attached to the various Pacific 
been found in Louisiana since its dis- Railroad Surveys, who observed it in 
covery in that State, at Opelousas, in many different localities. Among these, 
1849. Mr. Cassin notices this occur- Dr. Suckley's is of special interest. "I 
rence as that of a bird new to our fauna, myself," he says, alluding to its previ- 
and subsequently makes thef ; following ously noticed occurrences, "have carried 
remarks in his "Illustrations": "In a its recorded habitat as far north as the 
communication to us, accompanying one Columbia River, where, at Fort Dallas, I 
of the first specimens obtained by 'him obtained several specimens. Fort Dallas 
[Dr. E. Pilate] and intended for the col- is situated about latitude 46° 45' north, 
lection of the Philadelphian Academy, I presume this forms the northernmost 
that gentleman mentions having occa- limits of the species, excepting, perhaps, 
sionally seen it in company with other a narrow point of the same geographic 
species of ducks, but regards its appear- region which, crossing the Columbia, ex- 
ance as unusual in Louisiana." tends north of Fort Dallas about 100 

Our next notice, after Mr. Cassin's miles. This is the culmination north- 
original one, is Prof. Baird's of 1852. wards of the great wedge-shaped north- 
This author observes : "This beautiful ern prolongation of the southern fauna, 
species is now for the second time pre- occurring in the arid interior of Oregon 
sented as an inhabitant of North Amer- and Washington. Near Fort Dallas this 
ica. It appears to be a common bird teal seems to be an annual summer resi- 
in Utah." dent, where it breeds on the lagoons of 

The same year it is also given by Mr. the Columbia, and near the small lakes 



186 



THE GAME BREEDER 



and pond holes in the basaltic trap of 
the vicinity." 

The cinnamon teal was found breeding 
in Idaho by Mr. Merriam, who took a 
set of nine eggs, containing large em- 
bryos, on the 29th of June, on Marsh 
Creek. The nest was in swamp grass, 
and lined with down. The eggs of this 
bird are strictly oval in shape, one end 
being much smaller than the other — 
more so than is usual in this family. 
They are creamy white or pale buff, not 
shaded perceptibly with the grayish or 
olive drab so commonly observable in 
ducks' eggs. 

I do not think that the bird breeds in 
Arizona ; at least I have not been able to 
determine satisfactorily that it does so, 



as it always appeared to me to come in 
the fall, in September or October, with 
other species of wild iowl, and to leave 
in the spring with them. But its move- 
ments are not yet clearly defined, espe- 
cially since we have to take into consid- 
eration those of the South American spe- 
cies. It has not yet been determined 
whither these are coincident in migration 
or not ; but the supposition that they are 
so is the more improbable one.* 

* It now seems certain that the South Ameri- 
can species do not visit North America. — 
Editor. 

There appears to be nothing in the 
habits of this teal different from those 
of its well known ally, the blue winged 
teal and probably little to be said on this 
score. 



THE MIGRATORY BIRD LAW CASE. 

Extracts from the brief of Judge D. C. Beaman, of Colorado, in opposition to 
the validity of the federal act. 



Judge David C. Beaman, of Colorado, 
has filed a brief in the Migratory Bird 
Law case, in the United States Supreme 
■Court. 

Some of the points made by Judge 
Beaman, of Colorado, are of especial 
interest to game breeders. It is argued 
forcibly that the act is invalid for un- 
certainty in that it requires the Agricul- 
tural Department to make regulations 
and fails to provide any method or 
proof of publication of the regulations. 
The regulations were adopted and 
printed as circular No. 92 of the 
Bureau of Biological Survey, and our 
readers will remember that we pointed 
•out the fact that they created many fan- 
ciful crimes. 

Judge Beaman says, "Probably not 

one in a thousand of the people of the 

-country ever saw or ever will see one 



of the circulars or know where to find 
one (they being now out of print) or 
would ever think of looking for the pub- 
lication therein of a criminal law." 

2. Game bird propagation by private 
enterprise barred. 

Judge Beaman says: "The act fails 
to prevent the collection or keeping of 
birds of any kind in public parks, or as 
house pets, or by people engaged in game 
bird propagation. There are thousands 
of people in the East, and some in Colo- 
rado, engaged in the propagation of 
game birds, and this is encouraged and 
protected by the game laws of Colorado 
and some other States, and thousands 
of dollars are invested in it. It is a com- 
ing and important industry. 

Extensive game bird propagators in 
the East have taken this failure up with 
the committee without effect. 



■iMimmitimmiiMUi" 1 




THE GAME BREEDER 



187 



NOTES FROM THE GAME FARMS AND PRESERVES. 




Artificial Lake Full of Ducks. 



-From Our Wild Fowl and Waders. 



Breeding Wild Fowl in Kansas. 
George J. Klein. 

Various experiences with the teal have 
taught me that I can only get one set of 
eggs from the green winged species. The 
blue wings will lay three and even for 
times in a season. I have induced the 
-dusky duck, often called black duck, or 
black mallard, to lay three clutches of 
eggs. 

I know personally some pintails and 
blue-winged teal which laid eggs in May. 
Both birds incubated for ten days when 
a severe hail storm drove them from 
their nests and broke their eggs. Both 
birds made new nests and incubated the 
eggs laid in them for nearly two weeks 
when high water washed their nests 
away and in September these two ducks 
each hatched a brood of ducks in my 
meadow. 

I have never been in a position to 
breed any species of geese excepting the 
Canada geese. I have never attempted 



to take the eggs of these, always letting 
the geese hatch the eggs they laid, but I 
can see no reason why they would not 
lay more eggs if the eggs first laid should 
be gathered. 



Black Ducks. 

I have at my summer place a space 
about 500 feet square, fenced ; about one- 
third water, one-third marsh and one- 
third high land. Last winter I kept over 
twenty black ducks and seven drakes 
and they brought oft about 200 young 
ones last summer. I keep the ducks 
housed in the winter and turn them out 
early in the spring and pay no more at- 
tention to them excepting to feed them 
corn every morning. They all make their 
nests in the marsh and I do not disturb 
them. I have no doubt if I gathered the 
eggs they would lay many more than 
they do. 

My greatest trouble is with turtles and 
hawks. They get a great many young 



166 



THE GAME BREEDER 



ducks and the crows and black birds get 
some of the duck eggs. I am keeping 
about as many ducks this winter and ex- 
pect to have as many young ones next 
summer as I had last season. I also 
raise some swan and Canada geese. 1 
raise them' for my own amusement. 
New York. M. M. J. 



to waters where the vegetation is more 
abundant. J. W. Titcomb. 

Vermont." 



Muskrats and Ducks. 

The duck-muskrat incident to which 
you refer happened on one of a series 
of deep ponds that are a part of the 
source of the Niobrara River. On the 
day of the occurrence I had taken my 
.22 rifle and gone to these ponds to see 
what I could get. From behind a screen 
of weeds I shot at and hit a duck. Just 
before I fired I noticed a rat swimming 
towards the ducks and only a very few 
feet from them. The duck only made 
three or four flaps with its wings before 
it disappeared. I at»once jumped up and 
ran along the bank to get nearer and ar- 
rived at the point on the bank over the 
muskrats underwater hole in time to see 
the last few feathers of the duck disap- 
pear into it. The banks of these ponds 
being steep and the water deep, the rats 
den under the banks, instead of building 
houses, as they usually do. 

Nebraska. J. H. Tubbs. 



Editor Game Breeder: 

Under your notes from the Game 
Farms and Preserves with reference to 
Wild Duck Enemies, I want to contrib- 
ute my personal knowledge as to musk- 
rats. We have a pond, in front of the 
residence, where I have raised mallards 
and I discovered that the muskrats are 
very fond of cracked corn, which I put 
down for the mallards, but they are not 
satisfied always with the corn because on 
two occasions we have seen a muskrat 
actually seize a duckling about six weeks 
old. In one case it carried the duckling 
into its burrow ; in the other case the 
duckling escaped. It has been my ex- 
perience, however, that when there is 
a sufficient number of ducks on a pond 
to keep the vegetation pretty thoroughly 
cleaned out the muskrats do not find suf- 
ficient food and are inclined to migrate 



The Malformed Deer Horns. 

Mr. J. W. Gilbert writes that in his 
opinion the malformed deer horns (the 
picture of which, sent by Mr. Hoyt of 
California, was printed last month, wei 
caused by castration. If deer are cas- 
trated before they are a year old, he says, 
they are not likely to grow horns. 



We regret to learn that some of the 
quail imported from Mexico died on the 
journey. The troluble undoubtedly is 
due to keeping the quail too long in un- 
sanitary shipping boxes. They should 
not be held up for ten days or any other 
period but should come through as quick- 
ly as possible to reputable dealers. Since 
gray. partridges are shipped alive in large 
numbers from the Continent of Europe 
to England and many thousands also are 
shipped alive to America, there can be 
no doubt that our partridges can be, as 
they have been, shipped long distances,, 
safely, provided they have a quick start 
in sanitary shipping boxes. It will not 
be long before an abundance of quail 
will be marketed from the Central and 
Western States. These are bigger and 
better birds than the Mexican quail. All 
that has prevented the quail from becom- 
ing abundant and cheap everywhere is 
the "fool" laws and regulations which 
have prevented an important industry. 



Do Rabbits "Play Possum"? 

One morning looking out of my win- 
dow I saw a rabbit run from the yard 
across a village street. It was pursued 
by a dog which came in sight, gaining 
rapidly on his quarry. When the rabbit 
reached the middle of the street it fell 
over on its side with its legs extended 
and appeared to be dead. The dog ran 
up to it; inspected it for a moment or two 
and walked away on the opposite side 
walk, which descended in a curve to an- 
other street. The rabbit did not move 
until the dog had been out of sight for 
some time ; it then sat up, looked about 



THE GAME BREEDER 



189 




Hurry up Kids, it's Bedtime. 



— From John Haywood. 



to see if its enemy was in sight and 
hopped slowly across the street into the 
large yard of the adjoining property 
where it disappeared in the grass and 
weeds of an orchard. I have often won- 
dered if rabbits have a habit of playing 
possum and if there are many dogs which 
would pass bre'r rabbit when he appeared 
to have suddenly died. — Editor Game 
Breeder. 

— *- — 

Eagles. 

In a clipping sent to The Game 
Breeder we are told that much damage 
has been done in Ozark, Taney and 
Honell Counties, Mo., and in Baxter 
County, Ark., by eagles. 



Japanese Barberry. 

Editor Game Breeder : 

I know pheasants feed on Barberry, 
that is our common Barberry. I am 
tbinking of putting in my aviaries Thun- 
ber's Japanese Barberry which produces 
so much larger number of berries than 



our common variety. If you can ascer- 
tain in any way, I wish you would ad- 
vise me whether this berry is non-pois- 
onous. 

Kentucky. R. A. Chiles. 

[We shall be glad to have some of our 
readers answer the question. We are of the 
opinion that the Japanese Barberry has been 
introduced at some of the game clubs. — 

Editor.] - 

♦ 

"Yaas," said Uncle Silas, "my son Bill 
hez got back from a special course he's 
been a-takin' at college with a piece o' 
paper signed by the authorities sayin' as 
how he's an A. M. I dunno what an A. 
M. is, but I'm afeard they's some mis- 
take about it, for judgin' from the time 
he gets down to breakfast he behaves 
more like a P. M. ter me. 



She — Why do they paint the inside 
of a chicken-coop? 

He— To keep the hens from picking 
the grain out of the wood. — Lehigh 
Burr. 




English Market Gunner with Punt Gun. 



190 



THE GAME BREEDER 



T*?f Game Breeder 



Published Monthly 



Edited by DWIGHT W. HUNTINGTON 



NEW YORK, MARCH, 1916 



TERMS: 

10 Cents a Copy — $1.00 a year in Advance. 

Postage free to all subscribers in the United States. 
To All Foreign Countries and Canada, $1.25. 

The Game Conservation Society, Inc., 
publishers, 150 nassau st., new york 

D. W. Huntington, President, 

F. R. Peixotto, Treasurer, 

J. C. Huntington, Secretary 
Telephone, Beekman 3685. 



The Game Conservation Society is 1 
largest association of game breeders in 
the world. Many members of the so- 
ciety now own thousands of game birds, 
deer, buffaloes, antelope and other ani- 
mals and it is evident the wild life does 
not vanish anywhere when it is properly 
looked after. 



It was a great disappointment to 
members of the Game Conservation So- 
ciety not to be able to eat the wild tur- 
keys donated by members for its game 
dinner. Next winter the society pro- 
poses to have antelope, quail and all sorts 
of game for its subscription dinners and 
if necessary the meetings will be held 
outside of New York in a State where 
there is more freedom than there is at 
present in New York. How disgraceful 
it seems for a special police force to be 
ever ready to arrest people who eat food 
legally produced because they happen to 
serve it in a State where the food prac- 
tically has been exterminated. 



breeders of other States. Last year, as. 
we pointed out, the Protective Associa- 
tion seemed determined to make its ac- 
tivities purely local ; and the game breed- 
ers of other States surely cannot take- 
any interest in the Protective Associa- 
tion if it opposes our efforts to give them 
access to the best markets. 



We are pleased to observe that the 
American Protective Association will 
help keep up an interest in game breed- 
ing. We hope at its meeting this year 
it will decide to join the Game Conserva- 
tion Society and the National Association 
of Audubon Societies in the request to 
open the New York markets to the 



CINNAMON TEAL. 

We wish to invite the attention of" 
game breeders to the cinnamon teal. It- 
is a comparatively rare species and a 
very handsome species and doubtless it 
will command an excellent price as soon 
as the dealers offer it for sale. The com- 
paratively rare species of pheasants sell 
for several times as much as the conv 
mon ring-necked and dark-necked pheas- 
ants and their eggs bring proportionate 
prices. 

Since many private duck ponds and 
shoots are being started in America there 
surely will be a demand for cinnamon 
teal and we believe they will bring better 
prices than wood ducks or mandarins.. 
In an article published in this issue we 
are told that "the cinnamon teal is with- 
out doubt the commonest nesting duck 
in California." In spite of this fact, the 
writer says, it is a duck little known to 
sportsmen because it moves southward 
and is not present during the winter sea- 
son. 

The shooting season should open while 
the ducks are present since otherwise 
they are of no use to those who would 
shoot or eat them. We believe this teal 
can be handled easily on game farms and 
we would advise the breeders in Cali- 
fornia and in the Salt Lake Valley and 
elsewhere where they occur to try them. 
We are quite sure an advertisement in 
The Game Breeder will sell a lot of cin- 
namon teal at excellent prices and their 
eggs should also bring good prices. Since 
the wood duck and the blue-winged teal 
have been bred outside of their natural 
habitat, the first named even in foreign ■ 
countries where they are not indigenous, 
it seems likely the cinnamon teal can be 
utilized as ornaments for ponds on coun- 
try places. Many of these now have 
duck ponds and this teal should be at- 



THE GAME BREEDER 



191 



tractive also to preserve owners because 
a mixed bag is desirable. 

We would strongly advise California 
members of the Game Conservation So- 
ciety to deal in the cinnamon teal and 
there should be no objection to the in- 
dustry because the California laws do 
not permit the shooting of the teal when 
any are on hand to be shot. 



COMMERCIAL MALLARDS. 

M. E. A. Mcllhenny refers to the 
important fact that most of the so-called 
mallards seen on game farms and pre- 
serves are not true wild mallards and do 
not even resemble them closely. They 
are as he says all mixed up with Rouens 
English calls and other tame species. 
The writer referred to this fact some 
years ago and said, in "Our Wild Fowl 
and Waders," the one who has a flock of 
true wild mallards has a very valuable 
property. 



BREEDING OTHER SPECIES. 

Another good point made by Mr. Mc- 
llhenny is that the breeders should give 
more attention to teal and the other 
choice species which are excellent for 
sport and on the table. We regard the 
blue winged teal as the best water fowl 
in the world for the table, barring none 
not even the far-famed canvasback. We 
believe the teal will sell for splendid 
prices in the markets after we have made 
teal eating fashionable as the Game Eat- 
ing Department of the Game Conserva- 
tion Society soon will make it. A pond 
full of gadwalls, widgeons, cinnamon 
teal or any of the desirable food birds 
would add tremendously to the value of 
any country place and be a great source 
of pleasure for the owner. 

We would advise our readers to go 
in for teal breeding and the breeding of 
the other ducks and geese mentioned in 
this issue. It really is no great stunt 
to have a pond full of half-bred mallards. 

Breeders should begin with birds al- 
ready breeding in confinement or with 
eggs if they expect to have success the 
first season. 



PERSISTENT BIRDS AND "FOOL 
LAWS." 

It would appear from the excellent 
papers on breeding wild fowl, published 
in this issue, that most if not all species 
will persist in laying, if the first clutch; 
of eggs laid be destroyed or removed^ 
This is the rule with nearly if not all 
upland game birds also. The breeders of 
both the true game birds of the upland, 
and of wild fowl, should have the right 
to take the first eggs laid and to hatch 
them under hens, or even to sell them, 
since usually the birds will lay again.. 
As a matter of fact most breeders pre- 
sume they have the right to lift the eggs 
of their grouse, quail and turkeys as well 
as the eggs of their wild fowl and no< 
one nowadays seems to object. Many 
breeders also trap and handle their quail 
and do not care to have game wardens 
interfere with their industry. There has 
been a decided "revival of common 
sense" since this important matter was 
first referred to in The Game Breeder, 
and many "fool laws" which prevented 
the multiplication of game have passed 
into a state of "innocuous desuetude" ; 
often they are forgotten and remain un- 
executed. It is best to have them wiped 
out on the books, however, since now 
and then a fool game warden may break- 
loose and arrest a game breeder provide 
he does not belong to a grange. This 
would not be considered good politics. 



CORRESPONDENCE. 

Editor Game Breeder : 

Our association is with you, in your 
highly practical solution of the conserva- 
tion of game question — to a finish. 

National Sportsmen's Association. 
Allen S. Williams, Director. 

Game and the Farmer. 

The Game Breeder : 

Enclosed find subscription. I am op- 
posed to the motto, "protect the game 
by laws so we can shoot it." Upland 
game never can be made plentiful in the 
United States unless the farmers make 
it so. They hold the key to the situation. 
As soon as it will pay they will attend to 



192 



THE GAME BREEDER 



the matter, but first we must have the 
common sense game laws you advocate. 
Game breeding must be encouraged. 
Oregon. H. A. Powell. 

Interested in the Booklet. 

I have received the January copy of 
The Game Breeder. This is O. K. 

I was greatly interested in the booklet 
issued by the Hercules Powder Com- 
pany. This contains a lot of excellent 
information and will do much to stim- 
ulate interest in the new sport of game 
breeding. 

The work which you are doing is ex- 
cellent and I am in hearty sympathy with 
the more game movement. 

Boston, Mass. B. S. Foss. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

William R. Oates' opinion of the game 
law recently enacted by the State of In- 
diana is more than amusing, it is ridic- 
ulous indeed. He presumes, entirely 
without reason or justification, that per- 
sons engaged in the industry of rearing 
pheasants would become allied with the 
illegal or pot hunters. The idea that 
this domestic enterprise could not be car- 
ried on without interfering with the pro- 
per protection of game in the wild state 
is too absurd almost for discussion. The 
writer has . pointed out more than once 
that all policing should be done in the 
domains of the game birds and animals 
to be protected, and not in public or 
•private places. 

The "in possession" craze of game 
commissioners and wardens is becoming 
fanatical. Let the license fee for gun- 
ning be large enough to produce the re- 
quired sum to properly police the domain 
of the game to be protected. No en- 
closures or fenced lands should be in- 
cluded in such domain. If I enter the 
city of New York or any other place 
outside of such protected domain with 
game birds or animals in my possessio- 
fhe right of such possession should not 
and must not be questioned. This of- 
fensive espionage outside the limits of 
proper domain of such game birds and 
animals is entirely unwarranted, and if 
wardens will perform their whole duty 
it will be unnecessary. If the revenue 



as now received is inadequate to protect 
the game at the source (in its domain) 
then tax those receiving the benefits for 
the required sum whether it be the 
farmer, gunner or the citizens collective- 
ly, but do not interfere with the progress 
and growth of game breeding by domes- 
tic enterprise. Breeders of game birds 
and animals under domestic ownership 
and control must not be hampered by 
restrictive measures, simply because the 
commissioner conceives it easier to pro- 
tect those in the wild state by such far 
reaching and sweeping enactments. No 
one doubts that the midnight maurauder 
of a hen roost could be more quickly a 
prehended and rounded up if these same 
regulations were made to apply to oir 
domestic poultry, but who would submit 
for a moment to such restrictions and 
espionage, after all the progress that has 
been made from that small beginning 
with the wild jungle fowl in order that 
the officer of the law might be more c^ 
tain and more easily perform his work. 
Mr. Commissioner, it is a case of the 
net being entirely too big for the gam 
to be caught ; do not attempt to sub- 
ordinate so important an industry as 
game breeding by domestic enterpris 
but protect the game birds and animals 
in their proper domain, as herein pointer 1 
out; define game birds and animals and 
raise your revenue for such proper polic- 
ing without interfering with the more 
important industry of rearing game by 
domestic enterprise. 

New Jersey. S. V. Reeves. 

Editor Game Breeder: 

I have raised elk, deer and buffalo and 
they paid, both in pleasure and profit. 
If I was a younger man I would make a 
fortune raising those animals. I am 76 
years old. 

Nebraska. J. W. G. 

Meal Worms. 

In a letter from Mr. W. Stocregn he 
says: "We have meal worms in stock. 
They are sold at 25 cents per hundred." 



More Game and Fewer Game Laws. 



THE GAME BREEDER ■ 193 

Mallard Prices. abundance of drakes and lower prices 

In the Bulletin of the American Pro- for these than for ducks. I have known 

tective Association we read that "selected the drakes to be something of a drug on 

birds (mallards) from reliable dealers the market and have purchased some at 

bring $2 each for drakes and $1.50 for such times for 50 cents each, 

hens (ducks?). These figures are raised Drakes and ducks sell equally well in 

to $2.50 and $2 for spring bought birds." the New York markets where they bring 

This evidently is an error. The figures from $1.50 to $2 each. The only reason 

should be reversed. Since mallards are drakes sometimes are very cheap outsicL 

polygamous, in captivity at least, breed- of New York is that a more than ordi- 

ers always buy more ducks than drakes, nary "fool law"- prevents breeders from 

the proportion being usually three or selling their drakes in the New York 

four to one. The result is an over- market. 



THE PORTAGE HEIGHTS GAME FARM 

K~ E^i ROBERT J. McPHAIL, Head Keeper] 

|Portage Heights, Akron, Ohio!] 

Ring-Necked Pheasants Eggs For Sale 

For delivery prior> May[1 5, $25.00 per hundred ,For delivery after May 15, $20.00 per hundred 

$3.00 per dozen 

All our pheasant hens are mated with imported cocks. 
Distributors of PHEASANT GERMICIDE for the United States. A COOP of 15 CHICKS, one day old, with 
HEN, COOP and FEED and GERMICIDE enough to rear to 6 weeks old, including instructions, for $13.00. 

J. R. GAMMETER, - Portage Heights, Akron, Ohio 



Wild Turkey Eggs 

EARLY EGGS, $1 5.00 per dozen 
Later, $12.00 per dozen 

These eggs] are from true Wild Turkeys. Orders 
will be filled in the order in "which they are received. 
Early orders for two or more dozen eggs will be ac- 
cepted at the rate of $12.50 per dozen. I also have a 
few extra fine gobblers for sale, write for prices. 

MARY C. WILKIE 

BEAVERDAM ■ ■ VIRGINIA 



194 THE GAME BREEDER 



STONY LONESOME GAME FARM 

Mallard Ducks and 
Mongolian Pheasants 

We offer for immediate delivery (limited number) of 

Mallard Ducks and Mongolian Pheasants 

and will take orders for eggs, delivery in the spring. 

ADDRESS 

129 Pront Street, New York City, 

or JOHN FOSTER, West Hartland, Connecticut 



PHEASANTS, DUCKS AND EGGS 

Deer And Other Live Game 

FOR SALE, a superb lot of Golden, Silver and Amherst pheasants just 
right for breeding this spring and summer. 

I am now booking orders for eggs of the following varieties: Mon- 
golian, Ringneck, Chinese, Golden, Silver, Amherst and Reeves. 

Wood Duck, Mallard and Gray Call Duck eggs. 

All the eggs -I ship are guaranteed to be from non-related, pure 
bred, strong, healthy birds, correctly mated; all eggs are guaranteed not to 
be over three days old when they leave my farm. 

I also manufacture a full line of special foods for the successful raising 
of young pheasants and wild water fowl, also for feeding the old birds 
all the year 'round ; write for prices. 

WALLACE EVANS GAME FARM, ST. CHARLES, ILL. 

Largest and most successful breeders of pheasants, 
wild water fowl, deer, etc., in the world. 



In writing to advertisers please mention The Game Breeder or sign your letters: '-Yours for More Game.'' 



THE GAME BREEDER 



195 



Mackensen Game Park 

I carry the largest stock in America of live 
game birds, ornamental birds and quadrupeds. 

Hungarian Partridges 

I am prepared to fill the largest orders 
for these birds and for years I have filled 
practically all of the large State orders for both 
Partridges and Pheasants. 




"L>vV- 



, o-v ..^fV 




Pheasants 

My Pheasant pens hold thousands of 
Pheasants and I am prepared to furnish 
these birds in large numbers to State de- 
partments, individual breeders and preserves. 

Wild Duck 

Mallards, Black Duck, Teal, Wood Duck, Pintails and other species 

can be supplied in large numbers at at- 
tractive prices. Also Mandarins and all 
other water fowl. 

Wild Turkeys 

I am now the largest breeder and 
dealer in Wild Turkeys and can supply 
these birds in good numbers to State 
Departments and preserve owners 

J aarry the largest stock in America of ornamental birds and animals. My ponds now contain nearly 200 best 
Royal Swans of Kn gland I have fine lot of the beautiful pink FLAMINGOES and the very large European 
PELICANS. Also STORKS. CRANES. PEAFOWL, fancy GEESE and DUCKS. My pheasant pens contain over 
a thousand Ringneck and fancy PHEASANTS. All stock is kept under practically natural conditions. I have HO acres 
of land entirely devoted to my business. Can also promptly furnish BUFFALOES, DEER, LLAMAS, RABBITS, etc. 

Orders booked during summer. 

I have for years filled practically all the large State Orders and have better 
facilities for handling large orders than any other firm. 

Write me before buying elsewhere— it will pay you to do »o. Your visit solicited. 
I am only 60 miles from New York and 80 miles from Philadelphia. 

WM. J. MACKENSEN 

YARDLEY, BUCKS COUNTY, PA. 




Department V. 

In writing to advertisers please monlion The Game Breeder or sign your letteirs: "Yours for More Game." 



196 



THE GAME BREEDER 




Wild Water Fowl 

"Our Specialties." 

Wood Ducks, Mandarins Wild Black 
Mallards for stocking game preserves. 
Safe delivery guaranteed. 500 Can- 
ada Wild Geese, $8.00 to $10.00 per - 
pair. Australian, South American, 
Carolina Swans. 200 trained English 
Decoy Ducks, guaranteed Callers and 
Breeders, $5.00 per pair. Eggs, 15 for 
$2.00. Mallards and Canada Geese 
must be bought NOW to breed this 
Spring. For prices of other wild fowl 
apply to 

WHEALTON WILD WATER-FOWL FARMS 
Chincoteague Island, Virginia 




The Best in 
Pointers 

Puppies, Broken Dogs 
and Brood Bitches, by 
Champion Comanche 
Frank, Fishel's Frank 
and Champion Nicholas 
R. 

Write me your wants, please- 

U. R. FISHEL 
Box 35 HOPE, IND. 



M. G. and F. G. L 

Can you guess it? 



Wild Mallard Eggs 

From Select Stock: 

$25.00 per 100 
3.50 per 13 




From Utility Stock: 

$15.00 per 100 
2.00 per 13 

Clyde B. Terrell 
Oshkosh - Wisconsin 



NOW IS THE TIME 

If you expect to have fertile eggs next Spring, 
to buy your Birds ; don't wait until midwinter or 
next spring ; you will be disappointed. 

We Offer For Immediate Delivery. 

Silver, Goldens, Ringnecks, Lady Amhursts, 
Reeves, Elliotts, Mongolians, Swinhoes.Versicolors, 
Impeyans, Manchurian Eared and Melanotus 
Pheasants. We are now booking orders for eggs 
for Spring and Summer delivery of any of the above 
varieties. We quote Ringneck eggs $3.50 per 
dozen, f 25.00 per hundred ; Green head mallard 
eggs $3.50 per dozen, $25.00 per hundred. We also 
oner for sale Single Comb Buff and Blue Orping- 
tons, Rhode Island Reds, Japanese Silkies and 
Longtails, Wild Turkeys, Blue, White Japanned and 
Specifier Peafowls, as well as the following Ducks : 
Greenhead and black mallard, pintail, redhead, 
gad wall, wood, mandarin and Formosan teal, 
shovelers, baldpate and Blue Bill and green wing 
teal. 

WANTED 

White Peahens. In -Pheasants, any of the 
tragopans firebacks, cheer, sommering. Elliotts, 
white crested Kalij, Peacocks, Anderson's Lineatus, 
Golden Eyed Ducks and Old Squaw Ducks. Also 
Garganey and ring teal. In writing' quote num. 
ber, sex and lowest cash price. 

Send 30 cents in stamps for our new 1916 color- 
type catalogue of pheasants and rearing of pheas- 
ants. If you do nbt like it return in 48 hours after 
receiving, and your money refunded ; and if you 
make a purchase of us to the amount of $5.00 you 
can deduct price of catalogue. 

& CO. 

Kentucky 



CHILES 

Mount Sterling:* 



THE GAME BREEDER 



197 




Be an Early Bird 
This Year 



^fT\ 



Practice up now for the season's trophies. Start early. Be among 
the first out to pepper the speedy clay targets. Get an edge on the other 
fellow while the season is still young. There's no game can surpass 

TRAPSHOOTING 

for all 'round sport, health and pleasure. Gun "bugs" are the best 
of good fellows and there's a hearty welcome ready and waiting for 
you at the nearest gun club. 
Have you seen the 




Hand Trap? 



It's a practical little device that throws all kinds of targets. Great 
practice for both beginners and experts. Makes crack field shots. 
Folds up. Goes in a bag and makes trapshooting possible at any time 
or place. A portable gun club. Bully for camp and vacation use. 
Get one now. 

$4.00 at your sporting goods dealer's or sent pre- 
paid on receipt of price anywhere in the U. S. 

Write for booklet, 
The Sport Alluring, No. S354. 

E. I. Du Pont de Nemours & Company 

WILMINGTON DELAWARE 

When in Atlantic dtp visit the "Du Pont Store, " Pennsylvania Avenue 
and Boardwalk— see the big Du Pont Night Sign, and trv pour skill at 
the Trapshooting School at the end of Young's Million Dollar Pier. 



198 



THE GAME BREEDER 



Blue -Winged Teal — Green -Winged Teal 
and Other Wild Fowl 

For Sale, for stocking purposes only, a fine lot 
of Blue- winged and Green-winged Teal ; also a few 
pin-tailed ducks and some wild bred mallards. These 
are legal birds, shipped with State Permit. They 
are exempt from game law restrictions and they can 
be shipped safely to all parts of the United States 
where game breeding is legal or where it is legal to 
have live birds in possession. 

For particulars and prices, write to 

GAME PRESERVER, Care of The Game Breeder 

150 Nassau Street New York, N. Y. 



Pheasants, All Species 

Peacocks and White 

African Guineas 

For Sale 



For prices, address 

JOHN TALBOT 

South Bend Indiana 



/ will purchase Amherst and Reeves 
Pheasants and Pea Fowl. 



Established 1860 Telephone 4569 Spring 


PRED SAUTER 


LEADING TAXIDERMIST 


OF AMERICA 


42 Bleecker St., New York City 


Corner Lafayette Street 


Subway Station at the Door 


Specialist in all Branches 


of Taxidermy 


Write for Illustrated Catalogue 



THE GAME BREEDER 



199 




'i Id Turkey- 

Its restoration, is im- 
portant because domes- w -..,.(• ,, 

+ic turkeys are deci- *-J&%£&. ^r#- 
mated by a disease 




on the r 
market 



When Our Land Is Filled 
With Game 

A FEW years ago America was the greatest 
game country in the world. Our woods, - 
our fields, our water-ways, were teeming 
with game birds. Wild turkeys, quail, grouse, 
ducks, were familiar sights — to the sportsman; on 
the table; and in city markets. 

These conditions should again prevail. They 
may successfully be brought about through game 
farming. 

Game farming does not necessarily require a large 
amount of land and involves little expense in time 
and money. The work in itself is intensely interest- 
ing and affords both profit and pleasure to those who 
indulge in it. 

Results from Game Farming 

In the first place game bk'ds of many kinds com- 
mand high prices in city markets. Their eggs are 
eagerly sought by breeders. Secondly, if you are 
fond of hunting, the birds you raise will provide ex- 
cellent sport and food. Or if you prefer, and if you 
own large acreage, you may lease the privilege of 
shooting over your land. This does not mean that 
the sport of hunting, so far as the general public is 
concerned, will be restricted. On the contrary it 
will be increased; for game raised for sporting pur- 
poses cannot be closely confined in any given area. 

If you are interested in game farming- from any standpoint, 
you should write for a booklet which takes up the subject in 
a broad way and gives much interesting and valuable informa- 
tion regarding it. 

The book is called "Game Farming for Profit and Pleas- 
ure." It is well worth reading. Write for a copy. Use. 
the coupon below. 

Game Breeding Department, Room 202 
HERCULES POWDEB^ COi 

Wilmington, Delaware 

Manufacturers of Explosives; Infallible and "E.C* 

Smokeless Shotgun Powders; L & R. Orange Extra 

Black Sporting Powder; Dynamite for farming. 



Game Breeding Department, Room 202 

Hercules Powder Company, Wilmington, Del. 





Gentlemen:— Please send me a copy of Game Farming for Profit and Pleasure. I am interested in came breedins from 
the standpoint of. 



Name 
Address 



200 



THE GAME BREEDER 



CHAMPION MISSISSIPPI SPORT 



All American 
Champion, 1916 

Runner Up 
1915 




26379 F.D.S.B. 



FEE $30.00 



Having had a number of requests to breed to Sport by gentlemen who want bird dogs, I have decided to allow 
him 15 bitches this spring. Sport is a handsome orange and white setter of medium size and a five time winner. 
He is a young, vigorous dog that is sure to please those who want to develop bird work and stamina in their stock. 
He finds and handles more birds perfectly than any young dog I have seen, and in every race he has been in he 
has proved that he is a real bird dog. Sport is not only a field trial champion, but is a delightful dog to shoot 
over, as he is thoroughly broken and never seems to tire. His breeding is first class. Send for card. 

Ship Bitches to P. C. ELLIS, BOONEVILLE, MISS. 
After April 12th. to R. H. SIDWAY, 210 FRANKLIN ST.. BUFFALO, NEW YORK. 



PHEASANTS 

JUST WHAT YOU NEED 

Large, splendid Mongolian Cocks to cross on your small 
Ring Necks, to increase their size and stamina. 

Will make a special price while they last of $5 00 each 
or $50.00 a dozen for these birds. They are all pure 
selected brood stock and are in perfect condition. 

Safe Arrival Guaranteed, 

Ring Neck and Mallard Eggs, $25.00 per Hundred until May 15th. 
Mongolian Eggs, $40.00 per Hundred until May 15th. 

RIVER LAWN FARM 



RALPH H. SIDWAY 



210 Franklin Street 



BUFFALO, IN. Y. 



GAME BIRDS 

FOR PROPAGATING PURPOSES 

Genuine Wild Mallards, Black Duck, Green-wing and Blue- 
wing Teal, Pintails, Gadwalls, Shovellers, Wood Duck, Widgeon, 
Red- heads, Blue-bills, also a few pairs of extra choice Canvas-backs 
and Ring-bills; Canadian, Greater and Lesser Snow, Ross, Brant, 
Hutchins, Cackling and Blue Geese, supplied for propagating 
purposes. Finest quality in the country. 

Golden, Silver, Amherst, Reeves Pheasants at reasonable prices. 
I also am booking orders for ring-neck Pheasants reared on my 
preserve for delivery in early fall. 

I also have rare land and waterfowl from all parts of the world. 
Prices quoted for the asking. 

JOHN HEYWOOD, Gardner, Mass. 
Farms for the Propagation of Wild Fowl. 



WILD COTTON-TAIL RABBITS 

WILLIAM A. LUCAS, Naturalist, WOODHAVEN, L. I., N. Y. 

I offer for immediate delivery 3000 Northern Cotton-Tail Rabbits. Legal 
animals for restocking State Game Refuges and Game Preserves. 

I guarantee rabbits to be in prime condition. Live arrival guaranteed. 
Order now for sure delivery, Correspondence invited. 

I offer also a fine lot of Ring-Necked Pheasants of prime quality for 
breeding purposes ; Bob- White Quail ; Wild Turkeys ; Reeves Pheasants ; 
Golden Pheasants ; Lady Amherst Pheasants ; China Ring-Necked Pheasants 
and Mongolian cross breeds. I also carry a full line of ornamental Land and 
Water Fowl. Order now for sure delivery. 

"Grey Wild Mallard Ducks a Specialty" 

Although my prices are higher than those of some competitors, I, however, 
deliver nothing that is not of prime quality, my expenses are therefore high, 
but my buyers have certain and good results. 

WILLIAM A. LUCAS - WOODHAVEN, L. L, NEW YORK 



; H 




PROFIT AND SATISFACTION 

lie in the number of poults that you rear. Thousands die 
before they are two weeks old— the result of innutritious food. 

IF YOU FEED 

SPRATT'S Game Food 

AND 

Pheasant Meals 

you can reduce the percentage of mortality to a minimum and 
enhance the pleasure of game breeding 100%. 

SPRATT'S MANUFACTURE THE FOLLOWING GAME FOODS: 

SPRATT'S CH1CGRAIN (Contains a choice assortment of care- 
fully blended grains and seeds mixed together according to a 
formula only known to ourselves). 

SPRATT'S PHEASANT MEAL No. 12 (For Pheasant, Partridge 

and Quail Chicks). 
SPRATT'S PHEASANT MEAL No. 5 (For young Pheasants). 
SPRATT'S MAXCO (The most nourishing food obtainable). 

SPRATT'S PRAIRIE MEAT "CR1SSEL" (Takes the place of 
Ants' Eggs and is a perfect substitute for insect life) . 

SPRATT'S WILD DUCK MEAL (The best Food for Ducklings). 

SPRATT'S WILD DUCK MANNA (A strong nourishing food). 



Send 25c. for "Pheasant Culture." 
"Poultry Culture " sent on receipt of 10c. 



SPRATT'S PATENT LIMITED 

Newark, N. J. San Francisco St. Louis Cleveland Montreal 



L. 



MCZ ERNST MAYR LIBRARY 




3 2044 118 637 123 





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